Articles about "Time"


Callie Schweitzer named editorial director for audience strategy at Time Inc.

Time Inc. has named Callie Schweitzer its editorial director for audience strategy, Time Managing Editor Nancy Gibbs and Time Inc. EVP Todd Larsen tell staffers in a memo (below).

Schweitzer joined Time last August after hitches at Vox Media and Talking Points Memo. In her new role she’ll “continue to oversee the social team, editorial technology, content partnerships and newsletters at TIME while working on a variety of digital initiatives at the corporate level,” the memo says.

RELATED: Fortune magazine triples amount of online content even as Time Inc. cuts costs

We are delighted to announce that Callie Schweitzer has been named Editorial Director, Audience Strategy for TIME and Time Inc.

In a remarkably short time, Callie has come to play a unique role across departments, and, increasingly, across brands at Time Inc. Though based in TIME editorial, she has from almost day one worked with executives and editors throughout the company to help identify new digital opportunities and expand our existing audiences.

This promotion for Callie formalizes that role. She will continue to oversee the social team, editorial technology, content partnerships and newsletters at TIME while working on a variety of digital initiatives at the corporate level. She will have a dual report to Time Inc. Chief Content Officer Norman Pearlstine and to Time.com Managing Editor Edward Felsenthal.

Since joining TIME last year, Callie has been a key leader on the team driving the expansion of Time.com. In overseeing the social team, she has led the site to a record 20 million monthly social referrals, a 227% increase over last year. TIME’s combined social followings now exceed 20 million, the largest at Time Inc. Its daily newsletter, The Brief, has more than 600,000 subscribers with open rates averaging 40%, nearly twice the industry average.

Prior to joining Time Inc., Callie was Director of Marketing and Communications at Vox Media, publisher of The Verge, SB Nation and Polygon. There, she helped introduce and launch Polygon, the video game vertical, and Vox Creative, an in-house creative services wing. Before that, Callie was Deputy Publisher of Talking Points Memo, responsible for mobile, video and content partnerships and increasing audience growth. She has written for a variety of outlets. Named two years in a row as one of Forbes‘ 30 Under 30 in Media, Callie is a Summa Cum Laude graduate of USC’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism—and was for two summers an intern at People.

Please join us in wishing Callie every success in her new role.

Best,

Nancy and Todd

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Career Beat: Joe Weisenthal heads to Bloomberg

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Joe Weisenthal will host a TV show and develop a market-focused website for Bloomberg. He is executive editor at Business Insider. (Business Insider)
  • Ashkan Soltani will be chief technologist at the Federal Trade Commission. Previously, he was an independent privacy researcher who helped The Washington Post cover the National Security Agency. (WP)
  • Mick Greenwood is head of video at Time Inc. UK. Previously, he was managing editor of video at MSN. Richard Giddings is now head of mobile at Time Inc. UK. Previously, he was digital editions program manager there. (Time Inc.)

Job of the day: Vice News is looking for an associate producer. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

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Career Beat: Tom Knudson joins Center for Investigative Reporting

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Tom Knudson is now a senior reporter at The Center for Investigative Reporting. Previously he was a staff writer at The Sacramento Bee. (Center for Investigative Reporting)
  • Mark Smith will be mobile web editor for The Washington Post. Previously, he was senior manager of social media marketing at USA Today. (Washington Post)
  • Brian Gross will be deputy design director at The Washington Post. Currently, he’s lead senior designer there. Emmet Smith will be lead senior designer at The Washington Post. Previously, he was a senior designer there. (Washington Post)
  • Julia Cheiffetz is now executive editor at Dey Street Books. Previously, she was editorial director at Amazon. (@rachelsklar)
  • Stephen Collinson is now a senior enterprise reporter for CNN’s digital politics. Previously, he was a White House correspondent for Agence France-Presse. (Politico)
  • Matt Vella is now assistant managing editor at Time magazine. Previously, he was a senior editor at Fortune. Sam Jacobs is an assistant managing editor for Time magazine. Previously, he was a senior editor at Time. Kelly Conniff is now senior editor for special projects at Time magazine. Previously, she was a social media editor at Time. Mia Tramz is now multimedia editor at Time magazine. Previously, she was associate photo editor at Time Magazine. (Fishbowl NY)

Job of the day: The Idaho Statesman is looking for a breaking news reporter. Get your résumés in!

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Correction: A previous version of this story incorrectly said Tom Knudson was a Knight Fellow at Stanford University. In fact, he was the recipient of the Knight-Risser Prize for Western Environmental Reporting, which is sponsored by Knight. Read more

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4 quick Twitter tips from Time, CNN, Mashable and NPR

Four social media experts offered tips from their experiences detecting news, reporting news, publishing news and engaging with audiences at a panel moderated by Twitter’s head of news, Vivian Schiller, at the Online News Association conference in Chicago. Here are four of them.

Get retweeted by telling people stuff they don’t know

Quiz time: Callie Schweitzer, director of digital innovation at Time, asked attendees to guess which of these two tweets received the most retweets:

Schweitzer said the second tweet gave people info that they didn’t already know, accounting for its success. “Thinking for the retweet” is part of Time’s larger strategy for boosting social traffic.

The second tweet above contains a factoid that’s useful to readers even if they don’t click the link. More retweets means potential for more impressions, but remember that sharing doesn’t always correlate with clicking. The most shareable tweets aren’t always those that are most likely to compel followers to click a link.

Even on social media, it’s possible to have difficult conversations

Engaging with audiences on Twitter can go much deeper than asking for opinions on the news. Kat Chow, a blogger/social media producer for NPR’s Code Switch, highlighted how she cultivated conversation around topics that wouldn’t ordinarily be broached on social media.

One such topic: interracial relationships. Check out a Storify of tweets on the topic that Chow put together here.

Use geolocation to find and verify content

Searching for tweets by location is an advanced search option on Twitter and Tweetdeck. It doesn’t prove that a user reporting on, say, the arrest of Justin Bieber is telling the truth, but if you find out she’s located in Los Angeles, that can set you on the right path toward verification.

CNN Digital’s Dorrine Mendoza, senior social media producer, talked about CNN’s use of Dataminr, a tool for surfacing potential breaking-news tweets that officially launched this week for all news organizations. Using Dataminr is “like learning to play the piano,” Mendoza said, and it still requires a human touch to verify what the service uncovers.

There’s no substitute for on-the-ground coverage

When Mashable’s real-time news editor Brian Ries — in Mashable’s New York offices — heard word on social media of tear gas being used during riots in Ferguson, Missouri, he messaged Amanda Wills, who was on the scene, to fill her in. Her response: “I know.”

Mashable’s mastery of social reporting from its New York office freed up those on the ground to do deeper reporting, Ries said.


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Let’s start using clickbait for good

John Herrman’s take on the proliferation of “takes” — seemingly every news organization’s urge to publish something, no matter how unoriginal, about the hot issue of the day — has of course generated lots of takes on his piece itself.

In his post at the Awl, Herrman describes how news outlet after news outlet posted anything they could about a nonstory in July — the EPA accidentally sending a tweet about Kim Kardashian’s app:

There were dozens more of these stories, all about a single tweet, from virtually every outlet that publishes news. And they served their purpose admirably: They left no attention on the table. They represent “we should have something on this” news impulse stripped to its barest form, left unspoken and carried out as a matter of course. Endless minimalist Takes, obviously duplicative from the producer’s side but not necessarily from the other, all drawing energy from a single glowing unit of information.

My go-to example of a legacy news organization’s “ephemeral, aggregated, feather-light blog posts,” as Alex Pareene described them in a riff on Herrman’s piece at the Dish: “This Is What a Kiss Looks Like From Inside Your Mouth,” from venerable Time magazine.

Time more than doubled its unique visitors in the span of a year by nearly doubling its output of content. It’s not alone in that strategy, of course. Lucia Moses reported at Digiday this week that the New York Daily News is now publishing up to 300 posts per day. Two years ago it published 50 per day. You don’t achieve a sixfold increase in content with deep, original reporting.

But I pick on Time — which claims not to engage in clickbait — because its redesigned site also admirably attempts to convert those who take the Kardashian bait into visitors that stay for some hard news. The site’s continuous scroll means whatever Time.com story you arrive at first will transition into the top story of the moment, as determined by editors.

RELATED: Time.com’s bounce rate down 15 percentage points since adopting continuous scroll

The next story in the queue at Time.com when you arrive to view a clickbait story: "Al-Qaeda Chief Launches New Wing in South Asia."

The next story in the queue at Time.com on Thursday morning when you arrive to view a clickbait story: “Al-Qaeda Chief Launches New Wing in South Asia”.

Herrman’s post at the Awl comes a week after Facebook announced it was cracking down on clickbait by tracking how long users actually spend with the links they click. So there’s a chance these duplicative posts will be less likely to crowd your News Feed in the future if readers click away quickly once they realize there’s nothing new.

But Facebook making it harder for low-quality content to rule the News Feed might not keep publishers from trying. As Mathew Ingram notes at GigaOm, “if your ‘take’ on a specific event gets clicked on or shared the right way, it could become a massive traffic driver, pushing millions of eyeballs to your site.” You can afford to have a fairly low hit rate on stuff that takes two minutes to produce and that’s “written by 20-somethings making a (comparative) pittance,” as Pareene put it.

Yeah, this isn’t a particularly great thing for journalism, but it doesn’t have to be a disaster, either, if those cheap clicks subsidize something greater. If news organizations are willing to risk weakening their brands in an effort to save them, they should at least find a way for readers who click a wholly unoriginal take on a nonstory to be exposed to news that matters, too — the stories that might be less likely to take off on Facebook.

After all, homepages are less important than they used to be, and while Facebook users have incidental contact with news, they’re not guaranteed to see important stories, as Ferguson demonstrated. If you’re like most people and don’t read the newspaper anymore, there’s no front page to glance at before reaching the sports scores. Article pages are the natural place now for providing that incidental contact with hard news.

Until we get to a point where news business models reward value rather than volume, as Jeff Jarvis hopes, clickbait and quick takes aren’t going away. Time bows to the pressure to jump on trends and superficial viral videos just like anyone else, but at least it has found a way to give deeper news a chance, too, once they get those initial clicks.


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Scott Olson shot both Businessweek’s and Time’s covers this week

The work of Getty Images photographer Scott Olson is featured on both Bloomberg Businessweek’s and Time’s covers this week:

bw-cover-ferguson

time-cover-ferguson

Olson was arrested and released in Ferguson, Missouri, on Monday. He also took this iconic shot of the unrest there:

On his HBO show Sunday, John Oliver noted that CNN used the shot extensively, despite the fact that it shows a mailbox that says “Fuck the Police.” (Fast-forward to 6:25.)

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AP journalist and translator killed in Gaza

Simone Camilli in Beit Lahiya on Monday. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

Simone Camilli in Beit Lahiya on Monday. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. AP journalist and translator killed, photographer injured in Gaza: Simone Camilli and translator Ali Shehda Abu Afash “died Wednesday when Gaza police engineers were neutralizing unexploded ordnance in the Gaza town of Beit Lahiya left over from fighting between Israel and Islamic militants.” AP photographer Hatem Moussa was seriously injured in the explosion. (AP) | Moussa got AP’s “Beat of the Week” nod last month. (APME)
  2. Is there a second Snowden? James Bamford writes that he got “unrestricted access to [Edward Snowden's] cache of documents in various locations. And going through this archive using a sophisticated digital search tool, I could not find some of the documents that have made their way into public view, leading me to conclude that there must be a second leaker somewhere.” (Wired) | Related: What it’s like to do a photoshoot with Snowden. (Wired)
  3. Gawker covers BuzzFeed: BuzzFeed has removed nearly 5,000 old posts, some of which “clearly veered into plagiarism territory,” J.K. Trotter writes. (Gawker) | Yowch: “BuzzFeed divorces its first wife.” (@pbump) | Kelly McBride: “Taking articles down is a rare phenomenon among trustworthy institutions, and it should be executed in the full light of day.” (Poynter)
  4. BuzzFeed covers Gawker: In response to staff complaints about violent porn posted in comments, Gawker Media banned images from its Kinja platform. Kinja, Myles Tanzer reports, “is still mystifying employees and creating tensions between the company’s editorial staff and top executives.” (BuzzFeed) | Jezebel EIC Jessica Coen calls the image-banning move an insufficient “temporary band-aid.” (Poynter) | Nicholas Jackson suggests Gawker Media should “Shut down Kinja completely.” (It’s important to note here that Kinja is also Gawker Media’s CMS.) Comments, he writes, “just don’t belong at the end of or alongside posts … They belong on personal blogs, or on Twitter or Tumblr or Reddit, where individuals build a full, searchable body of work and can be judged accordingly.” (Pacific Standard)
  5. Alt-weeklies benefit from Advance’s changes: Publishers of Willamette Week, Lagniappe and Syracuse New Times have staffed up and seen growth in the wake of changes at daily papers in their cities. (AAN) | Related: Readership, alliances up at other New Orleans news outlets in last year (Poynter)
  6. MoJo’s Facebook mojo: Mother Jones engagement editor Ben Dreyfuss decided to “double down on Facebook,” Caroline O’Donovan writes, and has seen notable returns. “From what we hear, Facebook is privileging certain kinds of content-rich sites,” MoJo publisher Steve Katz says. (Nieman) | Related: “While many people now find their news on Facebook, it’s easy to forget that very recently they found it on Google, and will surely find it somewhere else in the not-too-distant future.” (NYT) | Also related: Facebook has seen many more publishers embed its posts since it launched FB Newswire. (Poynter)
  7. More BS television: Bill Simmons plans to launch “The Grantland Basketball Show” on ESPN. (The Big Lead)
  8. Journalists injured in Iraq: New York Times reporter Alissa J. Rubin, Adam Ferguson, a photographer freelancing for the Times, and Moises Saman, who was on assignment for Time, were injured in a helicopter crash in northern Iraq Tuesday. The pilot was killed. (NYT) | Saman’s pictures from the crash. (Time)
  9. Jobs still available in journalism: Dale Eisinger says he worked for “the New York office of a conservative media company based in the South,” where his charge was “to trawl Twitter, and the rest of the internet, for conspiracy and evidence of liberal malice. Then, to repackage these stories or posts or memes for the target demo.” (The Awl)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Adam Serwer will be national editor at BuzzFeed. Currently, he’s a reporter at MSNBC (Poynter) | Edith Zimmerman has been named senior staff writer for Matt Taibbi’s as yet unnamed magazine. She founded The Hairpin. Laura Dawn, former creative and cultural director for moveon.org, will be the magazine’s executive director of multimedia. (Poynter) | Dominic Rushe, Alex Needham and Oliver Laughland will each take different jobs at Guardian U.S. Rushe, a business correspondent, will be East Coast technology editor for Guardian U.S. Needham, formerly a culture editor for theguardian.com, will be arts editor for Guardian U.S. Laughland will join Guardian U.S. as a senior reporter. He’s currently a reporter for Guardian Australia. (The Guardian) | Jeanne Cummings will be head of operations for Bloomberg’s forthcoming politics vertical. Previously, she was a deputy editor at Bloomberg News. (Politico) | The Denver Post is looking for a features writer to cover food and lifestyle. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

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NYT’s Tyler Hicks on Gaza: ‘It’s impossible to know who’s who’

The New York Times | CNN | Time

On Tuesday, The New York Times’ photojournalist Tyler Hicks spoke with James Estrin for the Times’ Lens blog. Hicks and Estrin spoke about the images coming out of Gaza.

Sometimes people assume that you can have access to everything, that you can see everything. But the fighters are virtually invisible to us. What we do as photographers is document what we can to show that side of the war. There are funerals, there are people being rushed to the hospital, but you can’t differentiate the fighters from the civilians. They are not wearing uniforms. If there is someone coming into the hospital injured, you can’t tell if that’s just a shopkeeper or if this is someone who just fired a rocket towards Israel. It’s impossible to know who’s who. We tried to cover this as objectively as possible.

On Sunday, CNN’s Brian Stelter spoke with New York magazine’s Benjamin Wallace-Wells about how differently Israel and Hamas are handling the war.

“The images right now, I think, are driving this much more than the text,” Wallace-Wells told Stelter. “This is a story where the image imbalance is just incredibly strong, simply because Israeli citizens are not being successfully killed in the same way that Palestinians are.”

Stelter ended the segment with a question to CNN’s Tony Maddox, executive vice president and managing director of CNN International, about why Hamas militants aren’t shown regularly. Maddox’s reply:

“Our infield reporters have repeatedly said that Hamas militants are rarely to be found on the streets of Gaza. We have had no intimidation from Hamas, and received no threats regarding our reporting. They have so far refused all requests for interviews in Gaza.”

On July 30, Time’s LightBox shared Andrew Katz and Olivier Laurent’s story “Inside Gaza and Israel: Two Photographers, One War,” about Oliver Weiken with the European Pressphoto Agency and Andrew Burton with Getty Images. Weiken covered the war from Gaza. Burton covered it from Israel. Read more

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Time.com’s bounce rate down 15 percentage points since adopting continuous scroll

Three major news website redesigns this year look very different but have an important feature in common: articles that seamlessly transition to new content, without requiring readers to click or tap headlines and then wait for new pages to load.

This “continuous scroll” strategy for news sites’ article pages is gaining momentum. It’s been adopted by Time.com, NBCNews.com and LATimes.com, reflecting the fact that direct homepage traffic is waning (see the New York Times innovation report), and traffic from social media (particularly Facebook) just keeps growing.

So as readers increasingly enter sites from “side doors” or article pages, media organizations are trying to figure out how to get them to stick around. Pew recently found that visitors from Facebook are far less engaged than direct visitors. Here’s how sites that relaunched in the first half of 2014 are addressing that problem by making use of the continuous scroll (aka infinite scroll) feature in their article pages:

Time.com

Since its March redesign, Time.com’s bounce rate — the percentage of visitors who leave the site after viewing only one page — has declined by 15 percentage points, according to managing editor Edward Felsenthal. The percentage of desktop visitors going to another piece of content jumped 21 percentage points between February and May.

Felsenthal attributed that to the continuous scroll, which provides a clickless path for readers to reach another story. He said the left rail, which serves as a “traveling homepage” of links to the top stories of the moment, also helped.

The fact that Time.com queues up top stories, not related stories, is crucial to the site’s strategy for serving social visitors, Felsenthal said: “In many ways the major objective of our redesign was to showcase for those users the full Time offering.”

That seems to acknowledge that much of what attracts social media readers to the site initially might not be the content deemed most editorially important. So now, readers going to the site for a story that may not be what you’d expect from Time.com…

… will scroll into Time’s more substantive top stories once they get to the bottom of the article. (For what it’s worth, Felsenthal told Digiday, “We don’t want to do really clickbait-y Facebook posts, because it’s just not what the brand’s about. But we do want to tease.”)

World news typically doesn’t receive as much social engagement as softer content does, but Time’s redesign means more visitors will at least be exposed to hard news. Post-redesign, Felsenthal said, “The mix of our top 10 articles is more reflective of where we want to be.”

NBC News

The redesigned NBC News takes a different approach from Time. Article pages transition into related stories, not top stories. And some stories are compiled into “storylines,” so if you’re interested in “hot cars and kids,” you can read a stack of more than 30 stories.

Mobile page views in June were up 30 percent over the previous 12-month average, according to an NBC News spokesperson. On average, NBC News readers on desktop and mobile are seeing nearly 20 percent more pages per visit than before the site’s February redesign.

Los Angeles Times

The LA Times redesign is less seamless than the other two in terms of transitioning quickly to the next piece of content. There’s a choose-your-own-adventure quality to the layout; non-blog stories transition into a section page instead of another article page based on which section you choose:

latscroll

That gives readers more control over where the site takes them next, but requiring readers to choose what they see next adds some friction that the other sites lack.

A spokesperson for the LA Times said it was too early to share specifics about how the newspaper’s new site is performing. She summed up the goals of the May redesign:

• Eradicating print-centric and antiquated web concepts, such as “the fold,” “the jump,” “endless clicking” and “the dead end” with endless scrolling and multi-directional navigation
• Seamlessly pathing readers from one piece of content to the next, with section fronts and article pages anchored by a row of thumbnails that automatically transport readers to related coverage or other sections

Quartz, Fortune, and Cosmopolitan

The homepage-less Quartz is a clear influence here, particularly for Time. Whatever page you arrive on via social media occupies the top spot in the story stack, with top news — not related stories — below. Editorial news judgment plays a big role in the reader’s experience.

Quartz senior editor Zach Seward said it’s nice to see others emulate one of his site’s signature features: “It must mean we’re onto something.” He also said he doesn’t like the term “infinite scroll”:

The intent is to help users who get to the end of a story but want to keep reading. Some sites have dead ends, others create paralysis of choice. We choose to quietly suggest just one more story, which users can easily scroll into or just ignore. It’s all about that one moment rather some kind of infinite experience.

Seward recently told Digiday’s Ricardo Bilton that Quartz estimates “readers view about 50 percent more stories per visit than they would without the option to scroll.” And, Seward said, “When people choose to read another story on Quartz, about 80 percent do so by scrolling, as opposed to clicking on a headline.”

Time Inc.’s Money and Fortune have also adopted the Quartz-inspired Time.com template for their redesigns. And at the “sexy new Cosmopolitan.com”, a long stack of related stories is presented to readers at the bottom of article pages.

The article page is the new homepage, so what goes on underneath articles seems to be the paramount concern when redesigning a media site in 2014. Some, like Time and Quartz, choose to “quietly suggest” a particular story. Others, like the LA Times and Cosmo, are using the space below stories to offer lots of choices for readers. But all of them have redesigned with an eye toward that second click or page view.


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Fortune magazine triples amount of online content even as Time Inc. cuts costs

As the newly standalone Time Inc. looks to cut costs by 25 percent and media writers [Bloomberg, The Atlantic, Nieman Lab] outline the magazine publisher’s tenuous digital prospects, Fortune and Money have made 31 hires in recent months with one clear editorial strategy in mind: Publish more articles. A lot more.

Fortune is tripling the amount of content it publishes — up to 90 pieces per day. Money, meanwhile, is publishing about 20 to 30 pieces of content per day, the same amount it used to publish in an entire month. (Time.com has roughly doubled its output recently, too.)

The two financial magazines officially divorced from CNN last week due to the Time Inc. spinoff, launching new websites based on the platform for the recently redesigned Time.com.

Splitting off from their former home, CNNMoney, means Fortune and Money are taking full control of their digital presences. But that flexibility comes at the cost of losing referrals from CNN, one of the largest news brands on the Web. So the pressure to make up for any lost eyeballs seems to be on.

Time Inc. group publisher Jed Hartman told Poynter that although the CNN traffic “firehose” is gone, ending the CNN partnership doesn’t mean a free flow of traffic has just disappeared. Previously, CNN provided Fortune and Money with a “scientific amount of referrals, and we paid them money,” Hartman said. He claims Time Inc.’s plan for more cross-brand collaboration will help counter the loss of CNN referrals over time, and more content, particularly of the built-for-social variety, should bring some extra traffic.

CNN posted about 68 million unique visitors in January, while Time had 23 million, according to figures the companies provided me for past stories. CNNMoney saw 17.6 million unique visitors in April, but Time Inc. couldn’t break down how many of those were visits to Fortune or Money.

The old Fortune homepage, left, when it was part of CNN Money, and the new standalone homepage, right, on an iPhone. The new site is less dense and more mobile-friendly.

CNN, of course, will miss out on traffic due to the split, too: eight of CNNMoney’s top 15 traffic days last year can be attributed to Fortune and Money franchises. Money’s Best Places to Live and Fortune’s Best Companies to Work for accounted for CNNMoney’s top two traffic days in 2013.

Now those popular franchises have more nimble homes, breaking free of CNN’s design and content constraints. Fortune editor Andy Serwer told Poynter that although the CNN partnership had its advantages, “it didn’t really let us fully optimize Fortune in the digital space.” For instance, this year’s Fortune 500, which debuted last week alongside the new Fortune.com, can now take advantage of the left-rail navigation implemented by Time earlier this year (Big Human is the design studio behind the relaunches):

Money editor Craig Matters said his magazine’s new online home as a channel of Time.com will be a better fit Money’s content goals. “The mission [at CNN] is to feed the news beast. Things have a lifespan there on the homepage that’s measured in minutes,” but the new site allows Money to do more with big ideas, Matters said.

But Fortune and Money are also doubling down on smaller ideas. Many of their daily pieces won’t be 1,000 words or more: they’ll be 400-word pieces or interactive features instead. And they’ll be more shareable, like this Money quiz that matches the reader’s money style with famous TV couples.

(Time has also drastically upped its quantity of articles over the last year, with Web-friendly lists and such — some of which feel like clickbait. Yeah, Time is now yet another place where you can see a bulldog puppy kiss a baby and what a kiss looks like from inside a mouth.)

Matters said Money has hired seven journalists in recent months, with more hires to come. Fortune, which will also now have a near 24/7 news desk with editors in New York, San Francisco and London, has made 24 hires, despite about 500 Time Inc. layoffs related to becoming a standalone public company.


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Related: Time.com website redesign: ‘There’s a lot of text, and that’s intentional’ Read more

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