Articles about "Time"


Career Beat: Tom Knudson joins Center for Investigative Reporting

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Tom Knudson is now a senior reporter at The Center for Investigative Reporting. Previously he was a staff writer at The Sacramento Bee. (Center for Investigative Reporting)
  • Mark Smith will be mobile web editor for The Washington Post. Previously, he was senior manager of social media marketing at USA Today. (Washington Post)
  • Brian Gross will be deputy design director at The Washington Post. Currently, he’s lead senior designer there. Emmet Smith will be lead senior designer at The Washington Post. Previously, he was a senior designer there. (Washington Post)
  • Julia Cheiffetz is now executive editor at Dey Street Books. Previously, she was editorial director at Amazon. (@rachelsklar)
  • Stephen Collinson is now a senior enterprise reporter for CNN’s digital politics.
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4 quick Twitter tips from Time, CNN, Mashable and NPR

Four social media experts offered tips from their experiences detecting news, reporting news, publishing news and engaging with audiences at a panel moderated by Twitter’s head of news, Vivian Schiller, at the Online News Association conference in Chicago. Here are four of them.

Get retweeted by telling people stuff they don’t know

Quiz time: Callie Schweitzer, director of digital innovation at Time, asked attendees to guess which of these two tweets received the most retweets:

Schweitzer said the second tweet gave people info that they didn’t already know, accounting for its success.… Read more

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Let’s start using clickbait for good

John Herrman’s take on the proliferation of “takes” — seemingly every news organization’s urge to publish something, no matter how unoriginal, about the hot issue of the day — has of course generated lots of takes on his piece itself.

In his post at the Awl, Herrman describes how news outlet after news outlet posted anything they could about a nonstory in July — the EPA accidentally sending a tweet about Kim Kardashian’s app:

There were dozens more of these stories, all about a single tweet, from virtually every outlet that publishes news. And they served their purpose admirably: They left no attention on the table. They represent “we should have something on this” news impulse stripped to its barest form, left unspoken and carried out as a matter of course.

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Scott Olson shot both Businessweek’s and Time’s covers this week

The work of Getty Images photographer Scott Olson is featured on both Bloomberg Businessweek’s and Time’s covers this week:

Olson was arrested and released in Ferguson, Missouri, on Monday. He also took this iconic shot of the unrest there:

On his HBO show Sunday, John Oliver noted that CNN used the shot extensively, despite the fact that it shows a mailbox that says “Fuck the Police.” (Fast-forward to 6:25.)

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AP journalist and translator killed in Gaza

Simone Camilli in Beit Lahiya on Monday. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. AP journalist and translator killed, photographer injured in Gaza: Simone Camilli and translator Ali Shehda Abu Afash “died Wednesday when Gaza police engineers were neutralizing unexploded ordnance in the Gaza town of Beit Lahiya left over from fighting between Israel and Islamic militants.” AP photographer Hatem Moussa was seriously injured in the explosion. (AP) | Moussa got AP’s “Beat of the Week” nod last month. (APME)
  2. Is there a second Snowden? James Bamford writes that he got “unrestricted access to [Edward Snowden's] cache of documents in various locations. And going through this archive using a sophisticated digital search tool, I could not find some of the documents that have made their way into public view, leading me to conclude that there must be a second leaker somewhere.” (Wired) | Related: What it’s like to do a photoshoot with Snowden.
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NYT’s Tyler Hicks on Gaza: ‘It’s impossible to know who’s who’

The New York Times | CNN | Time

On Tuesday, The New York Times’ photojournalist Tyler Hicks spoke with James Estrin for the Times’ Lens blog. Hicks and Estrin spoke about the images coming out of Gaza.

Sometimes people assume that you can have access to everything, that you can see everything. But the fighters are virtually invisible to us. What we do as photographers is document what we can to show that side of the war. There are funerals, there are people being rushed to the hospital, but you can’t differentiate the fighters from the civilians. They are not wearing uniforms. If there is someone coming into the hospital injured, you can’t tell if that’s just a shopkeeper or if this is someone who just fired a rocket towards Israel.

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Time.com’s bounce rate down 15 percentage points since adopting continuous scroll

Three major news website redesigns this year look very different but have an important feature in common: articles that seamlessly transition to new content, without requiring readers to click or tap headlines and then wait for new pages to load.

This “continuous scroll” strategy for news sites’ article pages is gaining momentum. It’s been adopted by Time.com, NBCNews.com and LATimes.com, reflecting the fact that direct homepage traffic is waning (see the New York Times innovation report), and traffic from social media (particularly Facebook) just keeps growing.

So as readers increasingly enter sites from “side doors” or article pages, media organizations are trying to figure out how to get them to stick around. Pew recently found that visitors from Facebook are far less engaged than direct visitors.… Read more

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Fortune magazine triples amount of online content even as Time Inc. cuts costs

As the newly standalone Time Inc. looks to cut costs by 25 percent and media writers [Bloomberg, The Atlantic, Nieman Lab] outline the magazine publisher’s tenuous digital prospects, Fortune and Money have made 31 hires in recent months with one clear editorial strategy in mind: Publish more articles. A lot more.

Fortune is tripling the amount of content it publishes — up to 90 pieces per day. Money, meanwhile, is publishing about 20 to 30 pieces of content per day, the same amount it used to publish in an entire month. (Time.com has roughly doubled its output recently, too.)

The two financial magazines officially divorced from CNN last week due to the Time Inc. spinoff, launching new websites based on the platform for the recently redesigned Time.com.… Read more

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Time correspondent Simon Shuster tells the story of his abduction near Konstantinovka, in Ukraine, recently. He was stopped at a checkpoint where a man “pulled me from the car and cracked me on the head with the butt of his pistol.”

About half of his buddies got nervous, even sympathetic, when they saw the blood running down my face, and a few even ran to bring me some tissues. Maybe these were meant to be the peaceful citizens struggling for their rights. For a while, they bickered about what to do with me before calling their commander, a lanky man in camouflage named Vanya, who soon drove up with a long-barrel shotgun and a bandolier of red shells across his chest. “You’re screwed now,” one of his men whispered at me.

But on the ride back to his headquarters in the town of Kramatorsk, inside the occupied city hall, Vanya apologized for the beating. “We’re at war here,” he offered as an explanation. “We’re in a military situation.”

Simon Shuster, Time

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Time.com website redesign: ‘There’s a lot of text, and that’s intentional’

As Time.com‘s Managing Editor Edward Felsenthal, and Daniel Bernard, head of product, prepared to preview the newly redesigned Time.com for me, I expected one of two types of popular overhauls: a spacious, minimalist approach a la NPR, or a grid-based explosion of images a la NBC News and Bloomberg View.

But Felsenthal and Bernard emphasized neither of the two buzzwords I expected: “visual” and “white space.” Instead, the site in its second major redesign in 18 months unabashedly embraces density — text-based density!

“I think the homepage draws on visuals, which of course have always been a part of Time’s history,” Felsenthal said. “But it’s pretty dense, there’s a lot of text, and that’s intentional.”

That doesn’t mean the site is cluttered or overwhelming, just that it isn’t afraid to present visitors with lots of choices.… Read more

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