Articles about "Toronto Star"


How Jim Brady plans to make money in local

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Was SI’s LeBron James scoop legit? Sam Kirkland rounds up some thinkination from thinkinators and notes that SND’s Rob Schneider said the NYT’s celebrated sports section front on Saturday was inaccurate — James hadn’t signed at the time. (Poynter) | The “item did move on the sports AP wire, exactly as presented,” Margaret Sullivan writes. “I guess I can see his point, but it’s too literal,” Benjamin Hoffman, who designed the page, told her. (NYT) | James decided to go to SI rather than ESPN because 2010′s “The Decision” “upset America’s collective stomach and spoiled his reputation as a basketball god,” Robert Weintraub writes. “The average fan could read his moving, sincere announcement on SI.com and subconsciously think, Maybe it was ESPN’s fault, not LeBron’s, all along.” (CJR) | The “trade rumor — shorthand here for any offseason transaction news — has become the dominant form of NBA journalism.” (Grantland)
  2. How Jim Brady plans to make money in local: His Philly news startup Brother.ly will use a “mix of advertising, events and memberships,” Joe Pompeo reports.
Read more
Tools:
1 Comment

It’s ‘nonsensical’ to shield editors from corrections, Star ombudsman says

Toronto Star | iMediaEthics
| The Baltimore Sun

Toronto Star editor David Henderson inserted a mistake into a story by Bruce Campion-Smith, but the correction only acknowledged the error. “In this age of Twitter transparency does it make sense to withhold critical facts about who is responsible for mistakes?” Star Public Editor Kathy English writes.

It “was Campion-Smith who took flack” for the error on Twitter, English writes, but Star policy says “Publishing the Star is a team effort and published corrections do not ascribe blame within the Star.” English says she has “been on the fence in this debate between reporters and editors.” She continues: … Read more

Tools:
1 Comment

NYT’s photo-streaming fanny pack is ‘beating our reporters’ tweets’

Capital New York

Photographers at The New York Times have created a photo streaming backpack and a photo streaming fanny pack, Johana Bhuiyan reported Tuesday in Capital New York. Bhuiyan spoke with Josh Haner, a staff photographer and senior editor for photo technology at the Times, as well as a 2014 Pulitzer Prize winner for feature photography.

It is quite literally a backpack that allows photographers to send their photos to editors without having to be physically on site, or having to individually upload, color-correct and input caption information for each image.

“[Usually] our C.M.S. picks up the picture and ingests them and generates thumbnails and makes it available to photo editors,” Haner said. “And those photo editors have to make it available to digital editors and then include a caption in the C.M.S.

Read more
Tools:
1 Comment

Robyn Doolittle gets autotuned along with Rob Ford

Toronto Star reporter Robyn Doolittle plays a pretty big role in “Ford Nation,” a video by Anonymotif that autotunes Rob Ford, whom she has covered extensively.

“It’s not a big deal,” Doolittle said in a phone interview Friday about seeing the video, but “I did cringe a little.”

“As a reporter, you try to just stick with facts,” she said, and she usually tries not to offer her opinions. Those opinions, however, were pulled out from two much longer interviews, where Doolittle said she was careful to give nuanced answers on Ford and his future.

The results?

Yeah, autotune.

Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Custom camera-mounted device lets Toronto Star photographers file direct to live blog

The Canadian Journalism Project

It’s hard to file photos from Toronto’s Air Canada Centre, Toronto Star visuals editor Taras Slawnych tells Mark Taylor: “There are lights around the arena and every time these neon lights and billboard signs go on it creates a lot of interference. Traditional ways of submitting with a WiFi card or some other way just didn’t work.”

So the Star built its own device, called AWAC — for “Automated Web Access Coupling.” It sits “on the hot shoe mount,” Slawnych says, and “basically provides the Internet connection, the routing of it, and then sends the picture to an FTP site. There’s a (HTML) script here that handles it and then there’s another script that sends it to a ScribbleLive blog and the (Toronto Star) archive at the same time.”

Slawnych says he’s not sure whether the Star will patent the device — other reporters “are trying to figure out what the hell we’re doing,” he says — but did allow that it was 3-D printed and that the Star has spent about $2,500 developing it.… Read more

Tools:
1 Comment

Toronto Star gets another couple engaged

Toronto Star

Ben Rogul is the lucky bloke who got to propose marriage with the help of the Toronto Star. Rogul proposed to Emma Grosberg via the Toronto Star’s website Friday:

Grosberg said yes! So here’s what we know about the happy couple:

  • They appeared in a student production of “Les Miz”
  • Last year on this date, Rogul “made her a bouquet of roses out of bacon.”

Last year Mario Britz proposed to Lynette (Qian) Gao via the Star’s printed front page. Poynter’s attempts to check in with Britz have been so far unsuccessful. … Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Toronto Star helps propose marriage

Newseum

Someone’s getting a Valentine’s Day proposal in Toronto on Friday, and the Toronto Star is helping out.

Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Robyn Doolittle's Twitter photo

Reporter Robyn Doolittle gets angry emails after dressing up for photo shoot

When the Toronto Star’s Robyn Doolittle woke up this morning, 10 angry e-mails were waiting.

They weren’t about her solid and dogged coverage of Toronto’s mayor, Rob Ford. They weren’t about her new book, “Crazy Town: The Rob Ford Story,” which came out Monday.

They were about a fashion shoot.

Here’s the photo.

Read more

Tools:
2 Comments
On Halloween, Rob Ford pushed a photographer off his property. (AP Photo/, Nathan Denette)

Rob Ford and the media: Four lessons from 2013

On Halloween, staff at the Toronto Star watched as the city’s chief of police confirmed what the paper itself had been reporting for six months: Rob Ford, the city’s mayor, smoked crack. And there was a video to prove it.

The day after that news broke, I spoke with some of the staff at the Star to find out how they’d reported the ongoing story. Before that, it didn’t seem like anything could shake Ford or his popularity, despite several stories about public drunkenness and 911 calls from the mayor’s home. After existence of the crack video came out, it seemed possible. Nearly two months later, things in Toronto have only gotten stranger. Certainly, the tensions happening there are fun to watch on late night television.… Read more

Tools:
3 Comments
Toronto Mayor Rob Ford attends an Executive Committee meeting at city hall in Toronto on Tuesday, May 28, 2013.  Ford met with his executive committee for the first time since allegations of Ford's videotaped drug use surfaced earlier this month. Ford has denied the drug-use allegations, making a statement late last week after six members of his executive committee urged him to publicly address the allegations following a week of mostly silence on the issue. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Chris Young)

Rob Ford apologizes to reporter again: ‘I wholly retract my statements’

The Toronto Star

The Toronto Star’s Daniel Dale will not pursue a libel lawsuit against Toronto’s mayor, Rob Ford, the Star reported Wednesday, after Ford issued “a second, more complete, public apology.” Ford had implied Dale was a pedophile; Dale rejected an earlier apology in which Ford blamed the media for ascribing to him a “word I did not say.”

The new apology, by contrast, includes pretty much full retractions of everything Ford has said about Dale so far, and words he implied.

Finally there was absolutely no basis for the statement I made about Mr. Dale taking pictures of children, or for any insinuations I made. I should not have said what I did and I wholly retract my statements and apologize to Mr. Dale without reservation for what I said.

Read more
Tools:
1 Comment