Articles about "Toronto Star"


Why the Toronto Star unpublished an article about race

On Thursday, the Toronto Star published an article by Natasha Grzincic called “5 other labels for people of colour er… non-whites uh… racialized people.” Later that day, it took the article down.

The article, still available at partner sites like this one, notes that the Ontario Human Rights Commission has settled on the term “racialized” to describe people instead of using what it calls “more outdated and inaccurate terms” like “racial minority” or “non-white.”

The Star doesn’t have a style on using the term “racialized,” Public Editor Kathy English says in an email. Its style guide currently says to use the term “visible minority” rather than “nonwhite.” (The Star urges journalists to not refer to “colour or ethnicity unless it is relevant to the story.”)

Grzincic’s article looks at how “visible minority” and other terms are deployed. For example:

Ethnic minorities

Like “visible minority,” there’s the problem with “minority,” which could have a subordinate meaning. Same goes for “marginalized groups.”

Non-white

Non-preferred, because it defines people by what they are not. Used by StatCan to define visible minorities.

English says her office began to receive complaints that the article “made light of a sensitive, serious subject” not long after it was published. English said she discussed the article with Star Managing Editor Jane Davenport, who she said had not seen the piece before it went up.

Davenport thought the story should come down, so the Star doinked it and appended a note “In line with the Star’s transparency goals,” English said.

“Davenport’s view of the piece – which I agree with — is that a discussion of how visible minorities should be ‘labeled’ is inappropriate material for a listicle,” she writes. She continues:

The piece was flippant and commented on instead of reporting on the Ontario Human Rights Commission’s arguments. The writer of the piece is not a columnist with latitude to make such comment.

The Star is trying to find other outlets that published the piece and inform them it has removed it, English said. Further, “The newsroom is also looking further into the circumstances of the article being published.” Read more

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Jian Ghomeshi

Toronto Star investigated sex allegations against Jian Ghomeshi

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Jian Ghomeshi leaves CBC under dramatic circumstances: The broadcaster fired the host, whose show “Q” has gained a foothold below the 49th parallel as well, citing “information” it had received about him. (CBC) | “Over the past few months the Star has approached Ghomeshi with allegations from three young women, all about 20 years his junior, who say he was physically violent to them without their consent during sexual encounters or in the lead-up to sexual encounters.” (Toronto Star) | Ghomeshi acknowledges his “tastes in the bedroom may not be palatable to some folks” and says an ex-girlfriend launched a “campaign of harassment, vengeance and demonization against me” and that one person “began colluding with a freelance writer who was known not to be a fan of mine and, together, they set out to try to find corroborators to build a case to defame me.” (Jian Ghomeshi’s Facebook) | Canadaland’s Jesse Brown says he’s been working with the Toronto Star investigating Ghomeshi. “I don’t have any interest in celebrity gossip … this was something serious, something that I felt very strongly needed to be reported. .. This whole thing has a ways to go.” (Canadaland) | Carla Ciccone “was harassed and ridiculed by Ghomeshi fans after she published a thinly disguised account of a sexual encounter with the host on XO Jane last summer.” (Gawker)
  2. Why publishers are scared of Facebook: The company wants to help publishers crack mobile, maybe even host publishers’ pages and split ad revenue, David Carr writes. The big question: “Is the coming contest between platforms and publishing companies an existential threat to journalism?” Atlantic Media owner David Bradley tells Carr. (NYT) | Sam Kirkland wrote earlier this month about how Facebook news partnerships head Liz Heron “answered for a litany of perceived sins and slights” at ONA. (Poynter) | Ravi Somaiya: “Numerous publications, including The New York Times, have met with Facebook officials to discuss how to improve their referral traffic.” (NYT)
  3. Philly papers won’t make endorsement in governor’s race: Owner Gerry Lenfest writes, “Instead of an endorsement for governor, I asked the editorial boards of both The Inquirer and the Daily News to provide a summary of where the candidates stand on the critical issues facing the state, as well as the positions each paper has taken on those issues, and then let the voters decide who they think is most qualified.” (Philly.com) | Joel Mathis: “Through all the battles … of recent years, the Inquirer and its journalists have persistently strived to maintain a reputation as a strong, independent voice in the city. Sunday’s non-endorsement undermines that effort. Sometimes it’s better to take a stand.” (Philadelphia) | Lenfest is among the top donors to Gov. Tom Corbett, who is running for reelection. (AP) | Related: The Boston Globe endorsed — gasp — a Republican in the Massachusetts gubernatorial race. (The Boston Globe) | Dan Kennedy collects the times the newspaper has endorsed Republicans. (Media Nation)
  4. Reddit’s racism problem: “A persistent, organized and particularly hateful strain of racism has emerged on the site,” Jason Abbruzzese writes. “Enabled by Reddit’s system and permitted thanks to its fervent stance against any censorship, it has proven capable of overwhelming the site’s volunteer moderators and rendering entire subreddits unusable.” (Mashable)
  5. Obama doesn’t watch cable news: “I have spent, you know, countless hours with him on Air Force One, especially, in the conference room where we always had the TV on, and it was never in any of the trips I ever took with him, tuned in to cable news,” Jay Carney tells Brian Stelter. (TVNewser)
  6. Chicago mural honors James Foley: A group of his friends “wanted the mural to be near Cafe Jumping Bean, the 18th Street coffee shop where Foley spent time writing and working,” Stephanie Lulay reports. (DNAinfo) | The horrors he and others experienced during their capitivity. (NYT)
  7. News orgs want access to Sayreville hearings: “The media organizations argue that allowing the public access to the case will provide an outlet ‘for community concern’ in the highly charged case. (AP)
  8. Headline of the day: “World Series National Anthem Botched By That Asshole From Staind” (Deadspin)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: Canada’s National Post fronts the Ghomeshi mess with a very good headline: “World War Q.” (Courtesy Newseum)

    nationalpost-10272014 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Sam Biddle will be a senior writer at Gawker. Previously, he was co-editor of Valleywag. Nitasha Tiku, the publication’s other top editor, “will be taking over Biddle’s responsibilities.” (Business Insider) | Polina Marinova is now associate editor of audience engagement at Fortune. Previously, she was social media editor at OZY Media. (@polina_marinova) | Karen Leigh is now deputy Middle East bureau chief at The Wall Street Journal. Previously, she was managing editor of Syria Deeply. (@raju) | Rachel Orr will be a mobile designer at The Washington Post. Previously, she was a page designer at Express. (The Washington Post) | Stephen Bohner is now a mobile producer at The Washington Post. Previously, he was an online producer for The Arizona Republic (The Washington Post) | Kyle Brinkman has been named news director for KLFY in Lafayette, Louisiana. Previously, he was news director for WEAR in Pensacola, Florida. Andrea Clenney will be news director for WLTZ in Columbus, Georgia. Previously, she was news director for WCJB in Gainesville, Florida. Jennifer Rigby is vice president of special projects for The Weather Channel. Previously, she was vice president of live programming there. Leesa Dillon is now senior executive producer at WGCL in Atlanta. Previously, she was senior executive producer at KCTV in Kansas City. (Rick Geevers) | The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette is looking for an online news editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

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Career Beat: Former assistant director of Pew journalism project buys newspaper

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • John Batter will be CEO of Gracenote. Previously, he was CEO of M-GO. (Tech Crunch)
  • Mark Jurkowitz is the owner of the Outer Banks Sentinel in Nags Head, North Carolina. Previously, he was the associate director of Pew Research Center’s journalism project. (Romenesko)
  • Jon Ward is a senior political correspondent with Yahoo News. Previously, he was a political reporter for the Huffington Post. (Politico)
  • Shauna Rempel is now a social media strategist for Global News. Previously, she was social media and technology editor at the Toronto Star. (Muck Rack)
  • Chris Tisch is now business editor for the Tampa Bay Times. Previously, he was assistant metro editor there. (Tampa Bay Times)
  • Nathan Lump is now editor of Travel and Leisure. Previously, he was director of branded content at Condé Nast. (Time Inc.)

Job of the day: The San Antonio Express-News is looking for a web producer. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves:bmullin@poynter.org Read more

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Ferguson makes national and international front pages again

News from Ferguson, Missouri through the night told a markedly different story than it had since Saturday, when a police officer shot and killed Michael Brown. The change in the police force covering crowds of protesters, that crowd’s response and several vigils and protests around the country made news in and out of the U.S. Here are some of those front pages, courtesy, as always, Newsuem: Read more

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How Jim Brady plans to make money in local

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Was SI’s LeBron James scoop legit? Sam Kirkland rounds up some thinkination from thinkinators and notes that SND’s Rob Schneider said the NYT’s celebrated sports section front on Saturday was inaccurate — James hadn’t signed at the time. (Poynter) | The “item did move on the sports AP wire, exactly as presented,” Margaret Sullivan writes. “I guess I can see his point, but it’s too literal,” Benjamin Hoffman, who designed the page, told her. (NYT) | James decided to go to SI rather than ESPN because 2010′s “The Decision” “upset America’s collective stomach and spoiled his reputation as a basketball god,” Robert Weintraub writes. “The average fan could read his moving, sincere announcement on SI.com and subconsciously think, Maybe it was ESPN’s fault, not LeBron’s, all along.” (CJR) | The “trade rumor — shorthand here for any offseason transaction news — has become the dominant form of NBA journalism.” (Grantland)
  2. How Jim Brady plans to make money in local: His Philly news startup Brother.ly will use a “mix of advertising, events and memberships,” Joe Pompeo reports. Advertisers will have options beyond display ads: “A security company might sponsor a public-safety discussion group, for instance.” (Capital)
  3. NPR “downgrades” ombudsman job: The next occupant of that seat will focus “on fact gathering and explanation, not commentary or judgment,” Jay Rosen reports. “In my view, NPR is far stronger than this short-sighted and half-assed decision suggests. It has nothing to fear from an empowered ombudsman.” (PressThink)
  4. BuzzFeed articles disappear: After a “review of our most updated policies and standards,” BuzzFeed “edited some posts, removed certain posts and left other posts as is.” (Gawker) | BuzzFeed gave some early, senior employees the ability to go back and memory-hole articles. (Poynter)
  5. News orgs’ investments in race beats pays off: AP race and ethnicity reporter Jesse Holland broke the story of black Democrats supporting Sen. Thad Cochran after several reporters “had noticed advertisements in two of the state’s black newspapers, but no one knew who was behind them,” Tracie Powell reports. “I picked up the phone and called the black newspaper and asked who placed the ad,” Holland told Powell. “I’m not sure why no one else thought to do that.” (CJR)
  6. Twitter is 8 years old. Here’s Biz Stone‘s announcement of “Twittr”‘s website from July 15, 2006: ” It’s fun to use because it strips social blogging down to it’s essence and makes it immediate.”

  7. Following in Chrystia Freeland’s footsteps? Former Toronto Star reporter Allan Thompson is running for parliament. (Toronto Star)
  8. Lumberjacks’ revenge: Newspaper reporter makes “endangered jobs” list (Poynter) | Employment at TV stations slips a little. And “Total radio news employment is up this year versus last year, but not in the way radio news people would like.” (RTDNA)
  9. “This is a publicity stunt for sure, but one with heart”: Fans react to Archie Andrews‘ impending death, saving a gay friend. (AP) | “Archie is actually still alive in the Archie series set in the present day” and there’s a series where he’s a zombie, too. (Vulture)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: David Plotz is “dropping the mic” as editor of Slate, leaving his former deputy editor, Julia Turner, in charge. Said Plotz of his decision: “What am I gonna do, die here?” (Poynter) | Arthur Gregg Sulzberger, he of the leaked New York Times Innovation Report, has been named senior editor for strategy at the Times. (Poynter) | Maria Russo will be children’s books editor of The New York Times Book Review in August. (@PamelaPaulNYT) | Amanda Kost, an investigative journalist at KMGH in Denver, will be a national investigative reporter at the Scripps Washington Bureau. (Scripps News) | Alisyn Camerota is now an anchor at CNN. She was previously a co-host of America’s News Headquarters at Fox News. (CNN) | John Homans is leaving his job as New York Magazine executive editor to join Bloomberg Politics, a vertical led by “Game Change” authors Mark Halperin and John Heilemann. (Capital) | David Sirota joins International Business Times as a senior writer. (Digiday) | Marta Tellado, vice president for global communications at the Ford Foundation, has been named chief executive of Consumer Reports. She will replace Jim Guest, who became CEO and president in 2001. (New York Times) Want to meet LeBron James? The Northeast Ohio Media Group (which includes the Plain Dealer) is hiring a sports reporter. Get your résumés in! | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

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It’s ‘nonsensical’ to shield editors from corrections, Star ombudsman says

Toronto Star | iMediaEthics
| The Baltimore Sun

Toronto Star editor David Henderson inserted a mistake into a story by Bruce Campion-Smith, but the correction only acknowledged the error. “In this age of Twitter transparency does it make sense to withhold critical facts about who is responsible for mistakes?” Star Public Editor Kathy English writes.

It “was Campion-Smith who took flack” for the error on Twitter, English writes, but Star policy says “Publishing the Star is a team effort and published corrections do not ascribe blame within the Star.” English says she has “been on the fence in this debate between reporters and editors.” She continues: Read more

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NYT’s photo-streaming fanny pack is ‘beating our reporters’ tweets’

Capital New York

Photographers at The New York Times have created a photo streaming backpack and a photo streaming fanny pack, Johana Bhuiyan reported Tuesday in Capital New York. Bhuiyan spoke with Josh Haner, a staff photographer and senior editor for photo technology at the Times, as well as a 2014 Pulitzer Prize winner for feature photography.

It is quite literally a backpack that allows photographers to send their photos to editors without having to be physically on site, or having to individually upload, color-correct and input caption information for each image.

“[Usually] our C.M.S. picks up the picture and ingests them and generates thumbnails and makes it available to photo editors,” Haner said. “And those photo editors have to make it available to digital editors and then include a caption in the C.M.S. There are a lot of steps of the process, so basically what the backpack does is it bypasses all the C.M.S. and publishes a photo with a caption on [the online file storage service] Amazon S3, and we can link to those on our live blogs and interactives. So it’s not being powered by a standard C.M.S., it’s kind of an outside-the-box solution to that. After the fact we have to migrate all those pictures back onto the C.M.S. It’s sort of a backwards process from camera onto our site.”

The backpack uses proprietary software created the Times’ Ben Koski, Bhuiyan reports, and creating both the backpack and the fanny pack cost less than $5,000.

In March, Poynter’s Andrew Beaujon wrote about a device created by the Toronto Star, which isn’t a backpack but does let photographers send images directly to the Star’s live blog. Read more

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Robyn Doolittle gets autotuned along with Rob Ford

Toronto Star reporter Robyn Doolittle plays a pretty big role in “Ford Nation,” a video by Anonymotif that autotunes Rob Ford, whom she has covered extensively.

“It’s not a big deal,” Doolittle said in a phone interview Friday about seeing the video, but “I did cringe a little.”

“As a reporter, you try to just stick with facts,” she said, and she usually tries not to offer her opinions. Those opinions, however, were pulled out from two much longer interviews, where Doolittle said she was careful to give nuanced answers on Ford and his future.

The results?

Yeah, autotune.

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Custom camera-mounted device lets Toronto Star photographers file direct to live blog

The Canadian Journalism Project

It’s hard to file photos from Toronto’s Air Canada Centre, Toronto Star visuals editor Taras Slawnych tells Mark Taylor: “There are lights around the arena and every time these neon lights and billboard signs go on it creates a lot of interference. Traditional ways of submitting with a WiFi card or some other way just didn’t work.”

So the Star built its own device, called AWAC — for “Automated Web Access Coupling.” It sits “on the hot shoe mount,” Slawnych says, and “basically provides the Internet connection, the routing of it, and then sends the picture to an FTP site. There’s a (HTML) script here that handles it and then there’s another script that sends it to a ScribbleLive blog and the (Toronto Star) archive at the same time.”

Slawnych says he’s not sure whether the Star will patent the device — other reporters “are trying to figure out what the hell we’re doing,” he says — but did allow that it was 3-D printed and that the Star has spent about $2,500 developing it. The device solves a workflow problem other technical solutions to filing in the field don’t, Slawnych says:

Traditional wire agencies have a whole bunch of things to do this as well. The problem is the traditional workflow. Let’s say it’s a wire photographer shooting the game like we did. He sends the picture, and he’s probably sending it just as fast as we are. The picture then goes to headquarters and is then put on the wires. There’s probably a minute delay, maybe 30 seconds even. The picture is then sent out to an FTP to newspapers around the world. Then you’ve got a processor from your archive that is picking up these shots every 30 seconds, every minute. To put that picture online, you have to publish that picture onto your pagination system and wait for it to appear there. That’s probably another 30 seconds and then you have to move it onto your online Content Management System, which is probably minimum 30 seconds. And that’s if everyone is watching everything and has the time to do that. So that’s at least two, three minutes if every step worked out perfectly, which I doubt because there’s going to be other pictures moving on the wire. The editor that’s pulling that picture might not be paying attention because he’s doing other stuff at the same time. Our picture, without anyone having to touch it here, is on our blog within 45 seconds.

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Toronto Star gets another couple engaged

Toronto Star

Ben Rogul is the lucky bloke who got to propose marriage with the help of the Toronto Star. Rogul proposed to Emma Grosberg via the Toronto Star’s website Friday:

Grosberg said yes! So here’s what we know about the happy couple:

  • They appeared in a student production of “Les Miz”
  • Last year on this date, Rogul “made her a bouquet of roses out of bacon.”

Last year Mario Britz proposed to Lynette (Qian) Gao via the Star’s printed front page. Poynter’s attempts to check in with Britz have been so far unsuccessful. Read more

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