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Facebook and Twitter Applications on Ipad

Times of India publisher to staffers: Give us your social media passwords if you’re posting news

mediawiremorningHey, it’s Tuesday. Media stories coming your way!

  1. Strict, strange social-media policy at Times of India: Bennett, Coleman and Company Ltd staffers have been told not to post news stories from their personal social media accounts; instead, they must create company-authorized accounts, according to Quartz India. Even weirder: the company — which publishes The Times of India and The Economic Times — “will possess log-in credentials to such accounts and will be free to post any material to the account without journalists’ knowledge,” Sruthijith KK reports. (Quartz India) | Quartz-related: How often should a site launch a redesign, like Quartz just did? Mario Garcia: “The answer varies, and there is a basic principle I follow: redesign (and/or rethink) when you need it.” (Garcia Media)
  2. NYT’s controversial Michael Brown profile: New York Times public editor Margaret Sullivan writes that calling Michael Brown “no angel” in a profile of the 18-year-old killed by police in Ferguson, Missouri, was “a blunder.” (Public Editor’s Journal) | Times national editor Alison Mitchell told Erik Wemple that the phrase derived from the story’s lead, which told an anecdote about Brown seeing a vision of an angel. (Erik Wemple) | The Times has used the term “no angel” in the past to refer to Al Capone, Whitey Bulger and one of the Columbine killers. (Vanity Fair) | The profile was written by John Eligon. (The New York Times) | Austin Kleon’s “newspaper blackout” poem from Monday:
  3. Facebook cracks down on clickbait: How does Facebook define clickbait? It’s “when a publisher posts a link with a headline that encourages people to click to see more, without telling them much information about what they will see.” (Facebook) | “Algorithm tweaks don’t change the bottom line: Facebook is in charge of what you see,” Mathew Ingram writes. (GigaOm) | Upworthy’s Adam Mordecai is “stoked” about the news. (Twitter) | “We welcome a focus from Facebook on engaged time,” an Upworthy spokesperson told John McDermott. (Digiday) | Previously: Upworthy released code for its “attention minutes” metric meant to go beyond clicks. (Poynter) | Previously: Facebook’s Mike Hudack famously — and ironically? — ranted against the shallowness of U.S. news in May. (Poynter)

  4. How American journalist was released in Syria: Before Peter Theo Curtis was freed on Sunday, Qatar “had been working on the case for months at the request of the Obama administration.” David Bradley, chairman and owner of Atlantic Media Co., and a former FBI agent had traveled to Doha to meet with the Qataris, Adam Goldman and Karen DeYoung report. Officials insist no ransom was paid. (Washington Post)
  5. An ‘emotional cauldron’ after James Foley’s death: “When the press isn’t panicked about the Islamic State, it’s confused,” Jack Shafer writes. “Enemies exist, of course. But boogeymen don’t.” (Reuters)
  6. Ken Doctor on Gannett’s “newsrooms of the future”: “It’s easy to paint the laying off/buying out of veterans as simply getting rid of the digitally clueless. There’s some of that, of course, but this is mainly a financial exercise, as is most of the change we see sweeping the American news industry this year.” (Nieman Lab) | Previously: Gannett exec: Goal of reshuffled newsrooms is to invest “fewest resources necessary in production.” (Poynter)
  7. AP expands food columns: “Food Network star Melissa d’Arabian will join AP’s team of kitchen authorities, taking over ‘The Healthy Plate,’ a weekly column aimed at helping home cooks discover the healthier side of everyday ingredients,” according to a press release. (AP)
  8. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: John Batter will be CEO of Gracenote. Previously, he was CEO of M-GO. (Tech Crunch) | Mark Jurkowitz is the owner of the Outer Banks Sentinel in Nags Head, North Carolina. Previously, he was the associate director of Pew Research Center’s journalism project. (Romenesko) | Jon Ward is a senior political correspondent with Yahoo News. Previously, he was a political reporter for the Huffington Post. (Politico) | Shauna Rempel is now a social media strategist for Global News. Previously, she was social media and technology editor at the Toronto Star. (Muck Rack) | Chris Tisch is now business editor for the Tampa Bay Times. Previously, he was assistant metro editor there. (Tampa Bay Times) | Nathan Lump is now editor of Travel and Leisure. Previously, he was director of branded content at Condé Nast. (Time Inc.) | Job of the day: The San Antonio Express-News is looking for a web producer. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would you like this roundup each morning? This week, please email me: skirkland@poynter.org. You can reach your regular roundup guy at: abeaujon@poynter.org


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James Foley’s mother: ‘We have never been prouder of our son Jim’

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. ISIS video appears to show James Foley’s execution: Masked executioner speaking “with what sounds like an East London accent…. says that Mr. Foley’s execution is in retaliation for the recent American airstrikes ordered by President Obama against the extremist group in Iraq.” (NYT) | Foley’s mother, Diane Foley, on Facebook: “We have never been prouder of our son Jim. He gave his life trying to expose the world to the suffering of the Syrian people. We implore the kidnappers to spare the lives of the remaining hostages. Like Jim, they are innocents. They have no control over American government policy in Iraq, Syria or anywhere in the world.” (Find James Foley) | “As of 7 a.m. local time on Wednesday, Foley’s family in New Hampshire had no confirmation from the US government of Jim’s death, and they acknowledged there is a small chance the video may still prove to be fake.” (GlobalPost) | Here are some links to stories published at the one-year anniversary of his disappearance, last November. (Poynter) | The video also showed ISIS threatening another journalist, Steven Sotloff, who has been missing since last August. (NYDN) | Both the New York Daily News and the New York Post front Foley’s execution, with the New York Post choosing an image of his executioner applying a knife to his throat. (Via Newseum) | “Twitter is ‘actively suspending accounts’ of users posting images related to the apparent execution of journalist James Wright Foley, CEO Dick Costolo announced today.” (Re/code) | “Social Media Companies Scramble to Block Terrorist Video of Journalist’s Murder” (Foreign Policy)
  2. Meanwhile, in Ferguson: Police entered the media pen early Wednesday searching for protesters. I collected a few tweets about the incident. | 47 arrests last night, three handguns seized. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch) | Post-Dispatch front page: “A Day of Recovery” (Via Newseum, of course) | Poynter’s Kristen Hare is in Ferguson and STL today, reporting on newsgathering there. She has a gas mask all lined up. Say hi if you see her! Follow her on Twitter: @kristenhare. | Hare’s first post.
  3. Apple’s best-sourced reporter is a 20-year-old college student: Mark Gurman “makes more than six figures a year as senior editor and scoop master at 9to5Mac.com,” Michael Rosenwald writes. (CJR)
  4. Twitter confirms you’ll start seeing tweets from people you don’t follow: “The aim seems to be to increase the chance that more users may see content that they might find interesting.” (The Guardian) | “On the Facebookification of Twitter and the Twitterfication of Facebook” (Poynter)
  5. Snapchat moves into news: A new service called Snapchat Discovery “would let users read daily editions of publications as well as watch video clips of TV shows or movies by holding down a finger on the screen, like they do with photos and other messages on the app before disappearing.” (WSJ) | “Here is what Snapnews looks like in its primitive form: A ninety-second reel, divided into small units, each composed by finger or stylus. Who knew!” (The Awl) | Related: The Washington Post is on Yo. “We’ll YO every time we publish a new article on NSA or cybersecurity.” (@migold)
  6. Remembering Charles M. Young: The rock writer died Monday. He was 63. “He made his mark covering the CBGBs scene in the mid-1970s, writing Rolling Stone’s first major pieces on the Ramones, Patti Smith and Television, among others. He brought a fresh sense of humor to the magazine’s Random Notes section, and championed critically-disrespected bands like Van Halen.” (Rolling Stone) | Young in 2001: “It’s physically painful for me to squelch my writing style to fit some editor’s idea of useful consumer advice. I hate rating records with numbers and stars and grades. I hate lists.” (Rockcritics.com)
  7. Fareed Zakaria again faces plagiarism accusations: With Benny Johnson‘s pelt on their wall, @blippoblappo & @crushingbort turn their attention to the Atlantic Media contributor. (Our Bad Media) | Time will review Zakaria’s work again. “Fred Hiatt, the editorial page editor of The Washington Post, called the new accusations ‘reckless’ in a statement to Poynter.” (Poynter) | Zakaria’s full response: “These are all facts, not someone else’s writing or opinions or expressions.” (Politico)
  8. Condé Nast sells Fairchild: “Penske Media Corp. is acquiring Fairchild Fashion Media from Condé Nast, in a deal that includes WWD, its archive, Footwear News, M Magazine and the Fairchild Summits and events business.” (WWD) | “This is the second time this month that Condé Nast, which owns magazines such as Vogue and Vanity Fair, has sold an asset. It recently offloaded the shopping magazine Lucky, merging it with the online retailer BeachMint.” (NYT)
  9. Creative Loafing Charlotte sold: Charles Womack, the publisher of Yes! Weekly in Greensboro, North Carolina, purchased the alt-weekly from SouthComm, Inc. (Yes! Weekly)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Mabel Martinez is now beauty editor of Siempre Mujer. Previously, she was an editorial assistant at Parade Magazine. (Meredith) | Kelly Lattimer is now vice president and general manager of WQRF in Rockford, Illinois. Previously, she was general sales manager for KFXA in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (Nexstar) | Nora Zimmett is now senior vice president of live programming at The Weather Channel. Formerly, she was an executive producer at CNN. (TV Newser) | Paul Steinhauser will be political director for NH1. Formerly, he was CNN’s political editor. (Fishbowl DC) | Ama Daetz is now an evening anchor at KGO. Previously, she was a weekend anchor there. (TV Spy) | Job of the day: Willamette Week is looking for a reporter in Portland, Oregon. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) Send Ben your job moves:bmullin@poynter.org.

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Facebook and Twitter Applications on Ipad

On the Facebookification of Twitter and the Twitterfication of Facebook

Twitter lately has been full of journalists critical of Facebook for not being more like Twitter — and critical of Twitter for being too much like Facebook.

Throughout the clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Missouri, Twitter users have noted that their timelines are blanketed by Ferguson coverage. But their News Feeds on Facebook have been slow to reflect breaking news as it erupts:

Chartbeat’s chief data scientist, Josh Schwartz, weighed in with a traffic referral observation:

Photos, links to livestreams, and breaking-news updates were rapidly spreading on Twitter on Sunday night, while Facebook users were catching up on the day’s Ice Bucket Challenge videos. By morning, more Facebook posts about Ferguson were surfacing for Zeynep Tufekci, according to a Medium post, but by that point they clearly weren’t as impactful:

Many of those posts seem to have been written last night, but I didn’t see them then. Overnight, “edgerank” — or whatever Facebook’s filtering algorithm is called now — seems to have bubbled them up, probably as people engaged them more.

But I wonder: what if Ferguson had started to bubble, but there was no Twitter to catch on nationally? Would it ever make it through the algorithmic filtering on Facebook? Maybe, but with no transparency to the decisions, I cannot be sure.

Lots of news isn’t minute-by-minute breaking news, and Facebook still delivers news to far more people than Twitter does (30 percent of Americans get news on Facebook, according to Pew, while just 8 percent get news on Twitter).

So why can’t Facebook, with nearly five times as many users, compete with Twitter when it comes to giving stories a place to develop and lighting a fire under news organizations that previously weren’t committed to covering a story? Why doesn’t Facebook have the “visceral quality… that can bring stories to a boiling point,” as David Carr of The New York Times put it?

Will Facebook add Twitter-like features?

In a Facebook post, Circa’s Anthony De Rosa said “Facebook is virtually useless for trying to follow updates on ‪#‎Ferguson‬”:

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Twitter, of course, is virtually useless for trying to do lots of things Facebook is good for, like uploading an album of photos or a lengthy video, or carrying out conversations — like the one De Rosa had — that are easy to follow without compiling and sorting each comment with Storify.

But his point is that Facebook, with 1.3 billion users — a billion more than Twitter’s 271 million — could marshal content generated on the platform into something more useful and timely for journalists and readers alike. The company doesn’t widely promote its interest lists, and the News Feed’s “most recent” mode is difficult to find, as commenters on De Rosa’s post mentioned. The news team has made some progress with the Storyful-powered FB Newswire, but that’s just one account. So Facebook still feels like a good place to discover stories, but not a good place to watch stories happen and evolve in real time.

The Washington Post’s Tim Herrera adds some numbers to the widespread anecdotal evidence that news has a long shelf life on Facebook. About half of the posts Herrera viewed over a 5 to 6 hour span were old news, he writes. That’s because of the News Feed’s emphasis on personalization; newness doesn’t seem to be a crucial factor in the mysterious algorithm. Often, that’s a big advantage over the reverse-chronological rigidity of Twitter timelines, where stories can drop off the screen in seconds. On Facebook, it’s easier to discover stories relevant to you that you may have missed on the fast-flying Twitter.

Pundits seem to suggest Facebook has an opportunity — even a moral imperative — to bring important breaking news to its readers and stop sacrificing timeliness for personalization when stories like Ferguson happen. Facebook’s Mike Hudack jumped into De Rosa’s post to say “We are actually working on it.” Maybe that could mean a separate feed with a more Twitter-like stream, or more robust ways of filtering content related to trending topics.

What about a Twitter that’s more like Facebook?

Also in the news: Twitter is experimenting with displaying tweets favorited by someone you follow — even if you don’t follow the account whose tweet was favorited. That upends a core feature of the Twitter experience: You only see what you choose to see.

Quartz’s Dan Frommer explains how significant such a change would be:

This automatic insertion of new tweets into your feed, however, represents a fundamental shift in how Twitter works. Removing some control could be a good thing—the best tweets you’re not seeing are probably more interesting than many of the ones you can see. (Notably, this algorithmic filtering seems to have worked well for Facebook, which has an active user base almost five times the size of Twitter’s.) But it’s still a shift.

The specter of Facebook-style algorithms on the horizon for Twitter has Twitter aficionados worried. As GigaOm’s Mathew Ingram put it, “Facebook has become like a digital version of a newspaper, an information gatekeeper that dispenses the news it believes users or readers need to know, rather than allowing those readers to decide for themselves.” If Twitter becomes a gatekeeper, too, or even offers that as an alternative for its users, will stories like Ferguson make it through?

Frommer argues Twitter has no choice but to experiment with ways of delivering tweets beyond the real-time stream we’re used to:

The bottom line is that Twitter needs to keep growing. The simple stream of tweets has served it well so far, and preservationists will always argue against change. But if additions like these—or even more significant ones, like auto-following newly popular accounts, resurfacing earlier conversations, or more elaborate features around global events, like this summer’s World Cup—could make Twitter useful to billions of potential users, it will be worth rewriting Twitter’s basic rules.

Meanwhile, there’s also clearly an audience on Twitter — an influential one consisting of members of the media — that Facebook wants to better serve by writing some new rules, too. Both companies are trying to muscle in on the other’s territory, and that could have a major impact not only on how news spreads, but how news happens.


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Obama is an ‘enemy to press freedom,’ Risen says

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. More journalists arrested, threatened in Ferguson: Robert Klemko of Sports Illustrated, Telegraph reporter Rob Crilly and Financial Times reporter Neil Munshi all reported being detained last night in Ferguson. (Poynter) | A cop told KARG’s Mustafa Hussein to turn off his light “or you’re getting shot with this,” referring, apparently, to the gun he was holding. Police told MSNBC host Chris Hayes, “Media do not pass us, you’re getting maced next time you pass us.” (Gawker) || St. Louis station KSDK apologizes for showing video of the home of Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, who shot Michael Brown. (KSDK) | Brown was shot 6 times, a private autopsy says. (NYT)
  2. Watch Twitter if you want to keep up: David Carr: “Twitter still carries a great deal of unverified and sometimes erroneous information, but for all its limitations, it has some very real strengths in today’s media climate. It is a heat map and a window, a place where sometimes the things that are ‘trending’ offer very real insight into the current informational needs of a huge swath of news consumers, some of whom traditional outlets often miss.” (NYT) || FWIW, Kristen Hare‘s Twitter list of journalists covering Ferguson was invaluable when we were watching coverage last night. | Related: Twitter is testing a “downright blasphemous” new feature: “Some users are seeing a few tweets in their timelines that have merely been favorited by accounts they follow. Other tweets are showing from accounts that your friends follow.” (The Verge)
  3. Ferguson reporters talk coverage: Previously arrested Huffington Post reporter Ryan Reilly told Brian Stelter, “Any good journalist who was in that situation, the exact same thing would have happened to them.” Previously tear-gassed Al Jazeera reporter Ash-har Quraishi told Stelter “I do feel like we were targeted.” (CNN) | Washington Post reporter Wesley Lowery and St. Louis Post-Dispatch Editor-in-Chief Gilbert Bailon were on “Meet the Press.” (NBC News) | MSNBC reporter Trymaine Lee was on “On the Media.” (OTM)
  4. James Risen talks about Obama: Many people “don’t want to believe that Obama wants to crack down on the press and whistle-blowers,” he tells Maureen Dowd. “But he does. He’s the greatest enemy to press freedom in a generation.” (NYT) | Risen spoke at length on that subject in March at a talk I covered. (Poynter)
  5. Julian Assange will leave Ecuadorean Embassy at some point: His “bag is packed,” WikiLeaks spokesperson Kristinn Hrafnsson said, but he has no plans to turn himself in to police. (The Guardian)
  6. NPR puts editor’s note on story Glenn Greenwald challenged: Dina Temple-Raston‘s Aug. 1 story should have noted that intelligence agencies invested in the companies she reported on. | “I strongly agree with the critics that the story committed a fundamental failure,” NPR ombudsman Edward Schumacher-Matos writes, but Greenwald “hears more in the NPR report than is there.” (NPR) | “[I]t shouldn’t take the ombudsman nosing around for NPR to admit that it screwed up.” (Jay Rosen)
  7. Washington Post didn’t intend to put “buy it now” button in article: “What a happy coincidence.” (Pando) | Copy editors insert the links. (Digiday)
  8. Mobile news apps don’t make enough of the devices they inhabit: “If mobile is to become the dominant vector for news, retaining readers will be much more challenging than it is on a PC or tablet,” Frédéric Filloux writes. “Why not envision a few more steps forward and take advantage of technologies now embedded in every smartphone?” (Monday Note)
  9. The driving delusions of journalists: “The fantasy that gets a lot of reporters out of bed in the morning is that if they expose a bad thing then the bad thing will stop,” Nick Davies says. (Capital)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: John Fraher is now executive editor for international government at Bloomberg Europe, Middle East and Africa. Previously, he was managing editor for politics and economics there. Ros Mathieson has been named regional managing editor for international government at Bloomberg EMEA. Previously, he was deputy managing editor for economy and government there. Andrew Barden has become deputy managing editor for politics and economics in Europe. Previously, he was a team leader for Middle East economy and international government. Craig Stirling is now the managing editor for economy in Bloomberg’s Europe, Middle East and Africa division. He was formerly a team leader for Western Europe economy at Bloomberg. | Bill Strickland is now editor-in-chief of Bicycling. Previously, he was interim editor-in-chief. (Fishbowl NY) | Cherry Yates is now vice-president of corporate communications for Fox International Channels. Previously, she was vice president of global communications for National Geographic Channels International. (Fox International Channels) Job of the day:The Willits News, a twice-weekly newspaper in California, is looking for a news reporter. (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

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Newspaper asks staffers to refrain from tweeting other outlets’ stories

Mint

Editors at India’s The Hindu asked staffers to “exercise restraint while tweeting or sharing news stories from other competing news publications,” Vidhi Choudhary reports in Mint.

“We need particularly to ensure that in our enthusiasm and urge to participate in an on-line discussion or debate, we do not end up doing a favour to the competition,” the note from Managing Editor P. Jacob and Senior Managing Editor V. Jayanth reads.

Hindu Editor-in-Chief N. Ravi told Choudhary the guidance was “in line with the social media policies of other international media organizations like The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Reuters among others.” Mint notes the Journal, with which it has an exclusive content-sharing partnership in India, “actually doesn’t prohibit its reporters from sharing or retweeting stories by journalists in other media organizations.”

The New York Times doesn’t have a formal social media policy; “in general our message is that people should be thoughtful,” standards editor Phil Corbett told Poynter in 2012. Reuters says the intention of its social media policy is “not to muzzle anyone“:

Journalists are people too, with all the rights of citizens. If we want to tweet or post about a school play, a film or a favorite recipe, we are free to do so.

Poynter’s Ellyn Angelotti wrote last July about ways to create effective social media policies; “overreaching rules can stifle speech and creativity, harm morale and even expose your organization to legal trouble,” she said. Sam Kirkland wrote this summer about news organizations that consider retweets to be endorsements. Read more

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Vladimir Putin

Russian ‘law on bloggers’ takes effect today

mediawiremorningHello there. Sorry this isn’t Beaujon. Here are 10 or so media stories. Happy Friday!

  1. Russian blogger law goes into effect: It could crack down on free expression, Alec Luhn explains: “Popularly known as the ‘law on bloggers,’ the legislation requires users of any website whose posts are read by more than 3,000 people each day to publish under their real name and register with the authorities if requested.” (The Guardian) | “Registered bloggers have to disclose their true identity, avoid hate speech, ‘extremist calls’ and even obscene language.” (Gigaom) | The law also states that “social networks must maintain six months of data on its users.” (BBC News)
  2. More on David Frum non-faked photo fakery saga: Photo fakery surely occurs in places like Gaza, James Fallows writes. “But the claim that it has is as serious as they come in journalism.” The three words that are the “immensely powerful source of pride in what we do,” he says: “I saw that.” (The Atlantic) | Frum-related: 3 ways to prevent your apology from becoming the story, from Kristen Hare. (Poynter) | Gaza-related: Jay Rosen on why the AP revised its “members of Congress fall over each other to support Israel” tweet: “A major provider like the AP gets hit hard in the bias wars, so the principle, don’t give them ammunition! has to be built into its routines.” (Pressthink)
  3. SEC watchdog conducted lengthy leak investigation: “The SEC’s Office of Inspector General (OIG) started the investigation after Reuters published information about the regulator’s decision, taken in a closed-door meeting on Sept. 12, 2013, to settle its probe into JPMorgan Chase & Co’s massive London Whale trading loss.” Inspectors “don’t consider issues of press freedom when carrying out their investigations,” according to an OIG official. (Reuters)
  4. Media company Twitter interactions are up: The average number of Twitter interactions per month increased 159 percent between June 2013 and June 2014. John McDermott attributes that to October design tweaks that allow users to interact with retweet, reply and favorite buttons without first clicking or tapping the tweet. (Digiday)
  5. Chicago Tribune launches new website: The responsive platform — explained here by editor Gerould Kern — will be rolled out to other Tribune newspaper sites later this year, when metered paywalls will also be introduced. (Chicago Tribune) | Previously: Suggested tweets and choose-your-own adventure scrolling will be familiar to those who have visited the relaunched LA Times. (Poynter)
  6. More issues with Carol Vogel’s NYT stories? A tipster clues Erik Wemple in to three other troubling cases. But he notes “Not all eerie similarities are created equal.” (Washington Post) | A Times editor note earlier in the week acknowledges Vogel lifted part of a July 25 column from Wikipedia. (Poynter)
  7. Telegraph’s traffic up 20 percent in June: How? A “surge in Facebook traffic referral” as the Telegraph emphasized Facebook over Twitter. “It had previously been all about Twitter. Journalists are all on Twitter, and obsessed with it, so that is where the energy had gone,” Telegraph Media Group editor-in-chief Jason Seiken tells Mark Sweney. (The Guardian) | Related oldie-but-goodie: Ezra Klein tackles the “Why are journalists so obsessed with Twitter?” question. (Washington Post)
  8. Washington Business Journal won’t use the term ‘Redskins’: “I can’t dodge the question anymore,” editor-in-chief Douglas Fruehling writes in a paywalled article. (Washington Business Journal) | We’ll add them to our list of publications rejecting the football team name. (Poynter)
  9. It’s all about the clicks: “Has the Internet killed newspapers?” asks Jon Stewart. “YES!” The takeaway from this segment: Spend 15 minutes on a headline, five minutes on the article itself. (The Daily Show)
     

     

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Sara Just will be the executive producer of PBS NewsHour. Formerly, she was Washington deputy bureau chief for ABC News. (PBS NewsHour) | Josh Rubin will be executive producer and managing director for video at the Daily Dot. Formerly, he was a producer at CNN. Allen Weiner will be an editor at large at the Daily Dot. Formerly, he was a vice president of research for Gartner, Inc. (The Daily Dot) | Brandi Grissom will be enterprise editor for the Los Angeles Times. Formerly, she was managing editor of The Texas Tribune. (@brandigrissom) | Shelby Grad will be assistant managing editor for California news at the Los Angeles Times. Formerly, he was city editor there. Ashley Dunn will be deputy national editor for the Los Angeles Times. Formerly, he was metro editor there. Mark Porubcansky, foreign editor for the Los Angeles Times, will be retiring. Kim Murphy, who has been named assistant managing editor for national and foreign news, will add international coverage to her responsibilities. (Los Angeles Times) | Oskar Garcia, news editor for the Associated Press in charge of coverage of Hawaii, will be AP’s east region sports editor. (Associated Press) | LaToya Valmont will be managing editor of Glamour. Formerly, she was production director there. Job of the day: The Newhouse School at Syracuse University is looking for a director of its Goldring Arts Journalism program. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

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New York Times Slim

NYT acknowledges Carol Vogel lifted from Wikipedia

mediawiremorningGood morning. 10-ish, anyone?

  1. NYT acknowledges Carol Vogel lifted from Wikipedia: Part of a July 25 column “used specific language and details from a Wikipedia article without attribution; it should not have been published in that form,” a grisly editor’s note reads. (NYT) | Times spokesperson Eileen Murphy told Ravi Somaiya “editors have dealt with Carol on the issue.” (NYT) | “It seems to me that there can be little dispute about the claim,” Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan wrote Wednesday. “Anyone can see the similarity.” (NYT)
  2. E.W. Scripps Co. and Journal Communications will combine broadcast properties, spin off newspapers: The companies “are so similar and share the deep commitment to public service through enterprise journalism,” Scripps Chairman Richard A. Boehne says. Among the newspapers in the new company, named Journal Media Group: The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and The (Memphis, Tennessee) Commercial Appeal (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel) | “The complicated transaction is the latest move by media companies to focus on either television or print operations, with nearly all choosing to leave behind the slower-growing print business.” (NYT) | Al Tompkins: Scripps “is well positioned to cash in on mid-term political spending with stations in hotly contested political grounds of Ohio and Florida.” (Poynter) | “This deal looks much better for print spinoff than the Tribune deal. No debt or pension obligation. That is huge.” (@dlboardman)
  3. News Corp may bring back something like The Daily: It’s “working on an app-based news service aimed at ‘millennial’ readers” that would “would blend original reporting with repurposed content from News Corp properties such as the Wall Street Journal,” Matthew Garrahan reports. (FT) | Earlier this month, News Corp VP of product Kareem Amin talked about a project in development: “Our users are getting older and our products don’t have as much reach into the younger generation, and we would like to reach them on mobile devices,” Craig Silverman reports he said. (API) | #TBT: Jeff Sonderman on lessons from The Daily’s demise (Poynter)
  4. David Frum apologizes: Images from Gaza he questioned “do appear authentic, and I should not have cast doubt on them.” (The Atlantic) | “Atlantic spokesperson Anna Bross says Frum isn’t facing any repercussions from the company.” (Poynter) | “Frum showed how utterly inclined he is to believe and recirculate a claim of Palestinian photo fakery. Journalists guard against their biases by checking their reporting before publishing it.” (The Washington Post)
  5. Is Vocativ for real? The company, which says it plumbs the “deep web” for stories, has a deal to provide video to MSNBC and is about to announce a series on Showtime. But many who’ve used its vaunted software, Johana Bhuiyan reports, describe “a milieu in which they and other employees continually misled the company’s leadership about the usefulness of the software in their reporting, writing and video work.” Also worth noting: One exec tells Bhuiyan the company paid George Takei “under-the-counter” to tweet stories. (Capital) | #TBT: This is Bhuiyan’s last story for Capital; she’s moving over to BuzzFeed. Earlier this month, she gave advice to media reporters: “Turn your computer off once in a while.” (Poynter)
  6. Where did Plain Dealer journalists land? A year ago today, the paper cut about a third of its newsroom. Where are they now? There “aren’t a lot of of jobs that are cooler than being a reporter,” John Horton, who now works in media relations at Cuyahoga Community College, said. “I mean, that’s what Superman was.” (Poynter)
  7. Why Twitter’s diversity statistics matter: The company is 70 percent male and 59 percent white. That’s “a problem because white men unconsciously build products for white men – products that subtly discourage anyone else from using them,” Jess Zimmerman writes. (The Guardian) | Related: How would Twitter users react if it offered a moderated, Facebook-style feed? (Gigaom)
  8. Thomson Reuters releases second-quarter results: Revenue at the news division was down 1 percent from the same period last year. (Thomson Reuters) | The company’s cost-cutting program helped swing it to a profit, even as net income “was little changed.” (Bloomberg News)
  9. Here is a picture of Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein in the Washington Post newsroom: “Very, very cool moment.” (‏@JoshWhiteTWP) | Related: Jeremy Barr asks Post Executive Editor Marty Baron whether “that traditional path” to the Post, through small papers, is still the way in. Baron: “I would say that that model passed a long time ago.” (Capital)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Margery Eagan will be a spirituality columnist for Crux, The Boston Globe’s Catholicism vertical. Previously, she was a columnist for The Boston Herald. Lauren Shea is now a project director at The Boston Globe. Formerly, she was a senior digital producer at Arnold Worldwide. Corey Gottlieb and Angus Durocher will be executive directors of digital strategy and operations for Boston.com and The Globe’s online marketplace. Formerly, Gottlieb was a senior manager of product development at Major League Baseball Advanced Media. Durocher was a lead engineer at YouTube. Adam Vaccaro, formerly a writer at Inc. Magazine, has joined The Globe as a staff writer, along with Sara Morrison and Eric Levenson, both from The Atlantic Wire. Laura Amico, the creator of Homicide Watch, has also joined The Globe as news editor in charge of multimedia and data projects. (dankennedy.net) | Lindsay Zoladz will be pop music critic for New York magazine. She’s currently an associate editor at Pitchfork. (@lindsayzoladz) | Eva Rodriguez will be a senior editor at Politico Magazine. Formerly, she was an editorial writer at The Washington Post. (@DylanByers) | Job of the day: Oregon Public Broadcasting is looking for an assignment editor! Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

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AP is reviewing its procedures after third revised tweet in a week

What’s going on with the AP Twitter account lately? After this masterpiece Wednesday:

The AP revised. Read more

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How Jim Brady plans to make money in local

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Was SI’s LeBron James scoop legit? Sam Kirkland rounds up some thinkination from thinkinators and notes that SND’s Rob Schneider said the NYT’s celebrated sports section front on Saturday was inaccurate — James hadn’t signed at the time. (Poynter) | The “item did move on the sports AP wire, exactly as presented,” Margaret Sullivan writes. “I guess I can see his point, but it’s too literal,” Benjamin Hoffman, who designed the page, told her. (NYT) | James decided to go to SI rather than ESPN because 2010′s “The Decision” “upset America’s collective stomach and spoiled his reputation as a basketball god,” Robert Weintraub writes. “The average fan could read his moving, sincere announcement on SI.com and subconsciously think, Maybe it was ESPN’s fault, not LeBron’s, all along.” (CJR) | The “trade rumor — shorthand here for any offseason transaction news — has become the dominant form of NBA journalism.” (Grantland)
  2. How Jim Brady plans to make money in local: His Philly news startup Brother.ly will use a “mix of advertising, events and memberships,” Joe Pompeo reports. Advertisers will have options beyond display ads: “A security company might sponsor a public-safety discussion group, for instance.” (Capital)
  3. NPR “downgrades” ombudsman job: The next occupant of that seat will focus “on fact gathering and explanation, not commentary or judgment,” Jay Rosen reports. “In my view, NPR is far stronger than this short-sighted and half-assed decision suggests. It has nothing to fear from an empowered ombudsman.” (PressThink)
  4. BuzzFeed articles disappear: After a “review of our most updated policies and standards,” BuzzFeed “edited some posts, removed certain posts and left other posts as is.” (Gawker) | BuzzFeed gave some early, senior employees the ability to go back and memory-hole articles. (Poynter)
  5. News orgs’ investments in race beats pays off: AP race and ethnicity reporter Jesse Holland broke the story of black Democrats supporting Sen. Thad Cochran after several reporters “had noticed advertisements in two of the state’s black newspapers, but no one knew who was behind them,” Tracie Powell reports. “I picked up the phone and called the black newspaper and asked who placed the ad,” Holland told Powell. “I’m not sure why no one else thought to do that.” (CJR)
  6. Twitter is 8 years old. Here’s Biz Stone‘s announcement of “Twittr”‘s website from July 15, 2006: ” It’s fun to use because it strips social blogging down to it’s essence and makes it immediate.”

  7. Following in Chrystia Freeland’s footsteps? Former Toronto Star reporter Allan Thompson is running for parliament. (Toronto Star)
  8. Lumberjacks’ revenge: Newspaper reporter makes “endangered jobs” list (Poynter) | Employment at TV stations slips a little. And “Total radio news employment is up this year versus last year, but not in the way radio news people would like.” (RTDNA)
  9. “This is a publicity stunt for sure, but one with heart”: Fans react to Archie Andrews‘ impending death, saving a gay friend. (AP) | “Archie is actually still alive in the Archie series set in the present day” and there’s a series where he’s a zombie, too. (Vulture)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: David Plotz is “dropping the mic” as editor of Slate, leaving his former deputy editor, Julia Turner, in charge. Said Plotz of his decision: “What am I gonna do, die here?” (Poynter) | Arthur Gregg Sulzberger, he of the leaked New York Times Innovation Report, has been named senior editor for strategy at the Times. (Poynter) | Maria Russo will be children’s books editor of The New York Times Book Review in August. (@PamelaPaulNYT) | Amanda Kost, an investigative journalist at KMGH in Denver, will be a national investigative reporter at the Scripps Washington Bureau. (Scripps News) | Alisyn Camerota is now an anchor at CNN. She was previously a co-host of America’s News Headquarters at Fox News. (CNN) | John Homans is leaving his job as New York Magazine executive editor to join Bloomberg Politics, a vertical led by “Game Change” authors Mark Halperin and John Heilemann. (Capital) | David Sirota joins International Business Times as a senior writer. (Digiday) | Marta Tellado, vice president for global communications at the Ford Foundation, has been named chief executive of Consumer Reports. She will replace Jim Guest, who became CEO and president in 2001. (New York Times) Want to meet LeBron James? The Northeast Ohio Media Group (which includes the Plain Dealer) is hiring a sports reporter. Get your résumés in! | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

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Why are so many news organizations still worried about retweets by staffers?

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day, and from Kristen Hare, a world roundup):

— At Reuters, Jack Shafer picks up on my piece yesterday about how so many news organizations — with The New York Times being a notable exception — still seem afraid of reporters’ retweets coming across as endorsements: “Are NPR, the AP, and Reuters’s editorial reputations really so fragile that a 140-character tweet or retweet by a staffer can blow the whole thing down?”

— Three months into the “temporary” Chicago Sun-Times comments ban, publisher and editor-in-chief Jim Kirk tells Robert Feder “he’s heard no complaints lately and he’s seen no drop-off in online traffic.” Comments should return with a new CMS “sometime around the fourth quarter.”

— BuzzFeed’s director of editorial products, Alice DuBois, on the photo “slide things” in popular posts lately: “I do think there’s a part of the editorial mission to keep pushing and experimenting,” she tells Poynter’s Andrew Beaujon.

— The Dallas Morning News has abandoned its “premium” website, which was ad-free and aimed to be more nicely designed. “But you could see this result coming a Texas mile away,” writes Joshua Benton at Nieman Lab. “The premium site was not some beautiful, immersive experience — it was aggressively ugly and a pain to navigate.”

— “It used to be that there was an ever-more alarming growth in the hours people spent in front of the TV,” Michael Wolff writes at USA Today. “Now the greater concern is the limits of human attention.”


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