Articles about "Twitter"


Why are so many news organizations still worried about retweets by staffers?

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day, and from Kristen Hare, a world roundup):

— At Reuters, Jack Shafer picks up on my piece yesterday about how so many news organizations — with The New York Times being a notable exception — still seem afraid of reporters’ retweets coming across as endorsements: “Are NPR, the AP, and Reuters’s editorial reputations really so fragile that a 140-character tweet or retweet by a staffer can blow the whole thing down?”

— Three months into the “temporary” Chicago Sun-Times comments ban, publisher and editor-in-chief Jim Kirk tells Robert Feder “he’s heard no complaints lately and he’s seen no drop-off in online traffic.” Comments should return with a new CMS “sometime around the fourth quarter.”

— BuzzFeed’s director of editorial products, Alice DuBois, on the photo “slide things” in popular posts lately: “I do think there’s a part of the editorial mission to keep pushing and experimenting,” she tells Poynter’s Andrew Beaujon.… Read more

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Britain NSA Surveillance

Obama administration knew in advance about destruction of Guardian’s hard drives

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories. Want more roundups? We got ‘em! From Sam Kirkland: “Why are so many news organizations still worried about retweets by staffers?” From Kristen Hare: “Chinese journalists get a warning; press freedoms halt in South Sudan.”

  1. Obama administration knew British government planned to force Guardian to destroy hard drives with Snowden docs: AP scores emails with a FOIA request. “‘Good news, at least on this front,’ the current NSA deputy director, Richard Ledgett, said at the end of a short, censored email to then-NSA director Gen. Keith Alexander and others. The subject of that July 19, 2013, email was: ‘Guardian data being destroyed.’” (AP) | FLASHBACK: Video of Guardian editors destroying hard drives while technicians from the Brtitish intelligence agency Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) watched.
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Retweets are endorsements at NPR and AP, but not at NYT

NPR is still worried that retweets can easily be misconstrued as endorsements, according to a memo from standards and practices supervising editor Mark Memmott obtained by Jim Romenesko.

According to Memmott, “despite what many say, retweets should be viewed AS endorsements.” He quoted from NPR’s ethics handbook:

“Tweet and retweet as if what you’re saying or passing along is information that you would put on the air or in a ‘traditional’ NPR.org news story. If it needs context, attribution, clarification or ‘knocking down,’ provide it.”

The reiterated policy of treating every retweet as a message that could be dangerously misconstrued comes in light of an education blogger lamenting on an official NPR account that “only the white guys get back to me” on deadline.… Read more

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Mobile trends to watch in second half of 2014; plus, a newsgathering guide to Tweetdeck

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day, and from Kristen Hare, a world roundup):

— At Poynter, Adam Hochberg explores in depth Gannett’s three-year CMS overhaul to “replace the existing systems and serve every Gannett newsroom – from USA Today to KHOU-TV in Houston to the Fort Collins Coloradoan.”

Frédéric Filloux runs down three mobile trends to watch for the rest of 2014, including questions about what news sites should do about the market of Android users — which is bigger than the iOS market but less lucrative.

Joanna Geary, Twitter UK’s head of news, visited the Wall Street Journal in June to share tips on how to use Tweetdeck to gather news.… Read more

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SiriusXM fires Anthony Cumia, HuffPost loses top U.K. editor

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories, plucked with no small effort from the post-holiday-weekend ether. From Kristen Hare, a world media news roundup. From Sam Kirkland, digital stories to ease you back into working life.

  1. HuffPost UK editor leaves for fashion-trend-forecasting firm: Carla Buzasi will join the firm WGSN. She “famously tracked down HuffPo founder Arianna Huffington to pitch a UK version of the news site following AOL’s $315m (£184m) acquisition in 2011,” Mark Sweney reports. (The Guardian)
  2. SiriusXM fires Anthony Cumia: Satellite broadcaster let the “Opie and Anthony” host go “after careful consideration of his racially charged and hate-filled remarks.” (NYT) | Cumia’s Twitter rant (Gawker) | Cumia “Has a Long History of Public Awfulness” (Gawker) | Fans launch “#CancelSiriusXM” campaign, change Twitter avatars to an picture of Che Guevara “with Cumia’s face superimposed on it.” (THR)
  3. Why a N.Y.
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What makes a tweet likely to be retweeted? Plus, mobile ad revenue to surpass newspapers

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day, and from Kristen Hare, a world roundup):

— What makes a tweet likely to be retweeted? An algorithm developed at Cornell thinks it knows, and you can test your predictive powers against it in an interactive quiz at The New York Times by Mike Bostock, Josh Katz and Nilkanth Patel.

— According to eMarketer, revenue from smartphone and tablet ads will surpass revenue from radio, magazine and newspaper ads for the first time this year, Robert Hof writes at Forbes. Mobile will still trail television and desktop/laptop ad revenue, though.

— Mashable’s Brian Ries has a roundup of fascinating Twitter data from yesterday’s U.S.-Belgium World Cup match.… Read more

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In-tweet purchases could be imminent, and why sports media are better innovators

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day, and from Kristen Hare, a world roundup):

— In-tweet purchases might be coming to Twitter soon, according to screenshots shared by Re/code’s Jason Del Rey.

— At CJR, Sara Morrison explains why sports journalists have often been more willing to innovate: Pre-digital, “sports features tended to be the first things cut for space,” but “the internet solved that problem, and also allowed print journalists to match the pace of their television colleagues.”

— World Cup GIFs tweeted by @ReplayLastGoal are a copyright violation, FIFA is claiming, and ESPN and Univision have cracked down on Vine accounts from SB Nation and a video posted by Slate.… Read more

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Bird words

How to do Twitter research on a shoestring

Twitter’s increasingly influential role in journalism has prompted an accompanying upsurge in academic research, particularly around the ways in which journalists and media organizations have integrated Twitter into their norms and practices.

With 500 million tweets a day, Twitter offers researchers a potentially deep and rich stream of social media data. However, unlike historical newspaper content, which is readily available via library microfiches or databases like Lexis Nexis, much of the historical data on Twitter (what’s called the Twitter firehose) is walled off in costly private archives.

Information may want to be free, but accessing and analyzing that information can be costly.

The Library of Congress signed a deal with Twitter in 2010 to build an on-site research archive but that system has still not been finalized.… Read more

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Upworthy releases ‘attention minutes’ code; Sports Illustrated to relaunch website

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day):

Upworthy has released sample code for its “attention minutes” system of measuring engagement. “We actually use attention minutes as a core company goal,” Ed Urgola, Upworthy’s head of marketing, tells Fiona Lowenstein at CJR.

This week, Sports Illustrated becomes the latest Time Inc. magazine to undergo a website refreshing to be more mobile- and video-friendly, Emma Bazilian writes in Adweek. Poynter covered the redesigns of Time and Fortune and Money earlier this year.

Online news and politics videos are watched to the end 43 percent of the time, according to a Coull analysis of 12 million video plays.… Read more

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The day in digital: ‘Amazon seems serious,’ GIFs on Twitter, CTOs look into their crystal balls

“Amazon seems serious about changing the way smartphones work,” Walt Mossberg writes at Re/code. Two big features of the new Amazon Fire Phone: hands-free navigation and “Firefly” software that identifies objects with the camera and links users to product pages on Amazon.

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos holds up the new Amazon Fire Phone at the launch event Wednesda in Seattle. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

Facebook had a worldwide outage for about 30 minutes early this morning. No word yet on the cause, Mark Scott and David Jolly report at the New York Times Bits Blog, but everything seems to be OK now.

How far into the future are media company CTOs looking? Hearst is looking further than BuzzFeed, according to Justin Hendrix’s series of interviews at Medium, which Liam Andrew aggregated at Nieman Lab.… Read more

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