Articles about "Ukraine"


Susan Glasser

Susan Glasser is Politico’s new editor

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Politico gets a new boss: Politico Magazine Editor Susan Glasser is now the editor of Politico, Dylan Byers reports. John Harris will remain editor-in-chief. “She will appoint a new Executive Editor to oversee day-to-day newsroom operations, the leadership said. That person will replace Rick Berke, who resigned earlier this month.” (Politico) | Glasser will still oversee Politico Magazine, but will hire some senior editors in the next weeks. “Susan has plans to sharpen the editorial structure, bring in even more talent, upgrade our digital properties and bring more clarity and efficiency — and individual ownership — to our workflow,” CEO Jim VandeHei says in a memo to staff. | “One of the issues that led to Mr. Berke’s resignation, according to people with knowledge of the situation, was his lack of authority to make the moves he thought necessary, including autonomy over staffing — precisely the power Ms.
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James Foley family’s new fund will ‘honor what he stood for’

mediawiremorningGood morning. We’re nearly there. Here are 10 media stories, plus a fact that made me sigh and quietly review my life choices: The Notorious B.I.G.’s “Ready to Die” came out 20 years ago Saturday.

  1. Foley, Tice parents speak: “I really feel that our country let Jim down,” James Foley‘s mother Diane Foley tells Anderson Cooper. She says her son “was sacrificed because of just a lack of coordination, lack of communication, lack of prioritization.” (CNN) | Earlier this week, Austin Tice‘s parents told Clarissa Ward, “If an American citizen is held hostage overseas, you are discouraged and disparaged if you even consider paying a reward for a precious human child, because you don’t know where that reward money’s gonna go. …You know, we’re just a mom and dad. We just want our child back, and we wanna do whatever it takes.” (CBS News) | A message from the Foley family Twitter account: “please follow our new Twitter account @JamesFoleyFund.” (@freejamesfoley) | The fund will “honor what he stood for,” the family writes, with plans to build “a resource center for families of American hostages and [foster] a global dialog on governmental policies in hostage crises,” among other goals.
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Photojournalist with Russian news agency killed in Eastern Ukraine

Associated Press

The Associated Press reported on Wednesday that photojournalist Andrei Stenin has been killed in Eastern Ukraine.

Stenin was a photojournalist with a state-owned news agency, RIA Novosti, according to the AP.

Not counting Stenin, the Committee to Protect Journalists reports that a total of four journalists and two media workers have been killed this year in Ukraine.

From the AP:

The agency’s director-general, Dmitry Kiselyov, said in a statement on Wednesday that the remains in a charred car found outside the rebel stronghold of Donetsk have been identified as Stenin’s. Kiselyov said the car apparently burst into flames after coming under fire from Ukrainian forces.

This 2013 photo taken near Damascus and provided by ITAR-TASS in Syria, shows Russian photographer Andrei Stenin who was reported missing in Ukraine. Russia's state-owned RIA Novosti news agency says one of its photojournalists has died in eastern Ukraine. Andrei Stenin went missing in early August, his whereabouts unknown. The agency's director-general, Dmitry Kiselyov, said in a statement on Wednesday that the remains in a charred car found outside the rebel stronghold of Donetsk have been identified as Stenin's. Kiselyov said the car apparently burst into flames after coming under fire from Ukrainian forces. (AP Photo/ITAR-TASS, Mikhail Pochuyev)

This 2013 photo taken near Damascus and provided by ITAR-TASS in Syria, shows Russian photographer Andrei Stenin who was reported missing in Ukraine. Russia’s state-owned RIA Novosti news agency says one of its photojournalists has died in eastern Ukraine. Andrei Stenin went missing in early August, his whereabouts unknown.

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CNN, RT report missing staff in Ukraine

CNN

Ukrainian journalist Anton Skiba, who worked as a fixer for CNN, was abducted by pro-Russian separatists and is still in detention, Ivan Watson and Ingrid Formanek reported for CNN on Thursday.

Since his detention, CNN has attempted through a number of different separatist officials, including the office of the self-declared separatist prime minister Alexander Borodai, to secure Skiba’s freedom.
CNN chose not to report his abduction at the time while making efforts to obtain his release.
That has not happened to date, so CNN is now publicly asking those who are holding Skiba to release him immediately.

Graham Phillips, a British blogger working as a stringer for Russia Today, has also gone missing along with three others, RT reported. “The agency cites anonymous sources, saying the group of four was taken hostage by Ukrainian troops.”

In May, RT reported that Phillips was detained by the Ukrainian National Guard. Read more

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Nelson Mandela

The New Yorker still fact-checks more than you do

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 (or so) media stories.

  1. What happened between NBC News and Ayman Mohyeldin? NBC News said Friday it would return the reporter to Gaza. (HuffPost) | The clumsy move was less a conspiracy than a “news division making mistakes through ratings nervousness.” (CNN) | Here’s a Mohyeldin report from this morning. (NBC News)
  2. The new NewYorker.com launches: “The Web site already publishes fifteen original stories a day. We are promising more, as well as an even greater responsiveness to what is going on in the world.” (The New Yorker) | The publication assigns one fact-checker to its website: “And not to be defensive, but that’s one more fact-checker than probably anyone else has,” Editor David Remnick says. (Capital) | OH NO, A LISTICLE: The New Yorker tweets “eight things we think you’ll love” about the new site.
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Gaza invasion or missile strike? Newspapers wrestle with big news and limited space

A missile strike downs a commercial jet bound for Malaysia, killing nearly 300 people and generating international tension. Then, hours later, Israel invades Gaza, igniting a powder keg of conflict that has been steadily building for days.

With the hours until deadline ticking away, editors were faced with a difficult decision: which story should be featured more prominently?

Some newspapers gave both incidents similar play. The San Francisco Chronicle pushed down the flag and put both stories side-by-side, with kickers indicating international news. The downed jet story gets slightly more prominence with a heavier headline, photo and a three-line deck, but the four-line headline on the Gaza story gives it some parity and adds balance to the top of the page. Both stories jump.San Francisco Chronicle
The Washington Post and The New York Times also got both stories above the fold. The Post ran a rail down the left side and gave the story a four-line hed in large type, deftly making the difficult count work without splitting any subjects. Read more

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Reporters covering Malaysia Airlines crash

Here’s a first draft of a list with journalists covering the crash of the Malaysia Airlines flight, either from Ukraine or neighboring countries. I’ve started a Twitter list of reporters covering this, email or tweet more to me at khare@poynter.org or @kristenhare.

The Associated Press:

Pete Leonard, @pete_leonard.

Reuters

Anton Zverev, @Zreuters, is an editor in Moscow.

Al Jazeera America:

Scott Heidler, @ScottHeidler, is in Ukraine.

Rory Challands, @rorychallandsAJ, is in Moscow.

Stephanie Scawen, @tvsteph, is covering from Kuala Lumpur.

The Los Angeles Times:

Sergei L. Loiko is in Moscow.

Victoria Butenko is in Kiev.

Carol J Williams, @cjwilliamslat, is a foreign correspondent.

The New York Times:

Sabrina Tavernise, @stavernise, is at the crash site. The Times says her updates are being tweeted from @nytimesworld.

Noah Sneider, @NoahSneider, is also at the crash site. Read more

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5 questions to ask before publishing graphic images

As scenes of the Malaysia Airlines crash in Ukraine make the news and flash across social media, here’s something to revisit from Poynter’s Kenny Irby. Last month, Irby wrote a piece with some advice on showing graphic images.

There will be obvious questions about showing death and trauma. Should you show the faces and identify the dead? Where should those images be published, if at all? What are the alternatives? How many photographs should be used and how long should they remain on the screen or be posted?

Different organizations make different decisions, Irby wrote. Here are five tips from that piece.

Whenever journalists are faced with covering conflicts and violence, it helps to consider your ethical compass:

  • What is my journalistic purpose?
  • What organizational policies and professional guidelines should I consider?
  • What are my ethical concerns?
  • Who is the audience — and who are the stakeholders affected by my decision?
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Time correspondent Simon Shuster tells the story of his abduction near Konstantinovka, in Ukraine, recently. He was stopped at a checkpoint where a man “pulled me from the car and cracked me on the head with the butt of his pistol.”

About half of his buddies got nervous, even sympathetic, when they saw the blood running down my face, and a few even ran to bring me some tissues. Maybe these were meant to be the peaceful citizens struggling for their rights. For a while, they bickered about what to do with me before calling their commander, a lanky man in camouflage named Vanya, who soon drove up with a long-barrel shotgun and a bandolier of red shells across his chest. “You’re screwed now,” one of his men whispered at me.

But on the ride back to his headquarters in the town of Kramatorsk, inside the occupied city hall, Vanya apologized for the beating. “We’re at war here,” he offered as an explanation. “We’re in a military situation.”

Simon Shuster, Time

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A Ukrainian soldier stands guard at a road leading into Slovyansk, eastern Ukraine, Friday, May 2, 2014. Ukraine launched what appeared to be its first major assault against pro-Russian forces who have seized government buildings in the country's east, with fighting breaking out Friday in a city that has become the focus of the insurgency. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

BuzzFeed and CBS News journalists detained and freed in Ukraine

NBC News | The Huffington Post

CBS News correspondent Clarissa Ward and BuzzFeed correspondent Mike Giglio were among the journalists detained at checkpoints in Ukraine Friday. Both were released with all members of their parties, and both reported some violence: Ward said a CBS crewmember was beaten, and Giglio said one journalist got punched twice. (He also said his captors asked him to prove he’s American by saying the word “garden.”) Sky News reporters were also detained, Jack Mirkinson reports in The Huffington Post. Tweets from Ward and Giglio tell similar tales:

 

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