Articles about "USA Today"


Games

Games are serious business at news organizations

Later this month, Gannett plans to debut a page on USA Today’s website with 70 free-to-play games.

The page will include brain training and arcade-style games, said John Geddes, the company’s first director of gaming, entertainment, and events.

“We feel that expanding our portfolio to include additional popular games such as solitaire, mahjong, and brain teasers is a huge opportunity to not only provide something new for that existing audience but for us to also attract waves of new users,” Geddes said.

Gannett is merely the latest media company to expand its games offerings. Several news organizations have acknowledged the increasing importance of games, whether for storytelling or diversion:

  • The Washington Post has pulled together an in-house team to develop a platform that will allow the newsroom to easily create quizzes, leaderboards and surveys, said Emilio Garcia-Ruiz, the paper’s managing editor for digital.
Read more
Tools:
0 Comments
Screen Shot 2014-09-04 at 8.39.56 AM

Bloomberg makes exception to policy about employees who left

Good morning after a day of never-ending media news. Here are at least 10 media stories.

  1. Hizzoner is back: Mike Bloomberg will return to run Bloomberg L.P., Andrew Ross Sorkin reports. Current Bloomberg honcho Daniel L. Doctoroff will depart by the end of the year. “If it was up to me, he would have stayed,” Bloomberg tells Sorkin. (NYT) | “Wait I thought when you leave Bloomberg you can’t ever come back?” (@kleinmatic) | Some context for that jape. (Inc.) | “With great pride and gratitude I’ll be turning the @Bloomberg reins back over to @MikeBloomberg at year’s end.” (@dandoctoroff) | Doctoroff explains why he’s leaving: “I have always viewed myself as Mike’s steward at the company.
Read more
Tools:
0 Comments
USA Today

USA Today lays off between 60 and 70 staffers

USA Today laid off between 60 and 70 staffers Wednesday, with about half those cuts hitting its newsroom, a company source tells Poynter.

Gannett, which owns USA Today, announced in August it plans to spin off its publishing business. At about the same time, some of Gannett’s local papers announced changes to their newsrooms. Tennessean Executive Editor Stefanie Murray told Poynter the plan was to have “self-sufficient reporters producing publication-ready copy.”

Gannett spokesperson Jeremy Gaines told Washington Business Journal reporter Drew Hansen that “USA TODAY is working to align its staffing levels to meet current market conditions. The actions taken today will allow USA TODAY to reinvest in the business to ensure the continued success of its digital transformation.”

Some people have sent emails to staffers saying they’re gone, including book reviewer and reporter Bob Minzesheimer, health and wellness reporter Michelle Healy and online producer John Elliot.… Read more

Tools:
7 Comments
Screen Shot 2014-08-15 at 9.14.38 AM

Ferguson makes national and international front pages again

News from Ferguson, Missouri through the night told a markedly different story than it had since Saturday, when a police officer shot and killed Michael Brown. The change in the police force covering crowds of protesters, that crowd’s response and several vigils and protests around the country made news in and out of the U.S. Here are some of those front pages, courtesy, as always, Newsuem:… Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Newsrooms start thinking about wearables; USA Today has ‘Social Media Tuesdays’

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day):

— “I’m not sure how smart watches will help journalism per se, but I do see things like Google Glass and drones as having a big part to play,” Sydney Morning Herald innovation editor Stephen Hutcheon tells Julie Posetti in a PBS MediaShift rundown of mobile challenges for newsrooms.

— From Leslie Kaufman’s profile of USA Today and publisher Larry Kramer in The New York Times: “For Social Media Tuesdays, the staff must act as if there is no other way to get their articles except through sites likes Facebook and Reddit.”

— In Denmark, “legacy media are the prime way for accessing digital news,” Frédéric Filloux writes.… Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Polk Awards

Did the government throw shade on latest Greenwald scoop?

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories. Also, from Sam Kirkland, your digital morning stuff, and from Kristen Hare, a look at journalism outside the U.S.

  1. Did the government try to stink up Glenn Greenwald’s latest story? The American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee’s national president, Samer Khalaf, says “It wasn’t that they were saying it was false. They were saying they can’t respond to a story that wasn’t out yet.” (The Washington Post) | The Intercept “began hearing about Justice Department officials attempting to discredit our story long before that [ADC] meeting took place.” (The Intercept) | Related: Bart Gellman answers objections to his latest NSA story, which he wrote with Julie Tate and Ashkan Soltani. (The Washington Post)
  2. Remembering John Seigenthaler, who died Friday: The Tennessean’s package | Former Poynter President Karen Dunlap remembers Seigenthaler.
Read more
Tools:
0 Comments
Britain NSA Surveillance

Obama administration knew in advance about destruction of Guardian’s hard drives

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories. Want more roundups? We got ‘em! From Sam Kirkland: “Why are so many news organizations still worried about retweets by staffers?” From Kristen Hare: “Chinese journalists get a warning; press freedoms halt in South Sudan.”

  1. Obama administration knew British government planned to force Guardian to destroy hard drives with Snowden docs: AP scores emails with a FOIA request. “‘Good news, at least on this front,’ the current NSA deputy director, Richard Ledgett, said at the end of a short, censored email to then-NSA director Gen. Keith Alexander and others. The subject of that July 19, 2013, email was: ‘Guardian data being destroyed.’” (AP) | FLASHBACK: Video of Guardian editors destroying hard drives while technicians from the Brtitish intelligence agency Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) watched.
Read more
Tools:
0 Comments

Daily Mail removes story after George Clooney calls it false, ‘dangerous’

USA Today | The Guardian

Mail Online has removed a story that the actor George Clooney wrote about for USA Today. He said the story, involving his planned marriage to Amal Alamuddin, was “completely fabricated.”

The July 7 Mail Online article by Hannah Roberts and Sara Nathan said Alamuddin is a member of the “Druze sect, a medieval offshoot of Islam, who are forbidden to marry outsiders.” The Mail reporters wrote that “There can be harsh penalties for those Druze who marry outsiders” and that Alamuddin’s mother objects to the marriage on religious grounds.

Clooney in 2013. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

Alamuddin’s mother is not Druze, Clooney noted in his piece.

Other news outlets have picked up the story, including the New York Daily News and Boston.com (which embedded an E!… Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Mobile trends to watch in second half of 2014; plus, a newsgathering guide to Tweetdeck

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day, and from Kristen Hare, a world roundup):

— At Poynter, Adam Hochberg explores in depth Gannett’s three-year CMS overhaul to “replace the existing systems and serve every Gannett newsroom – from USA Today to KHOU-TV in Houston to the Fort Collins Coloradoan.”

Frédéric Filloux runs down three mobile trends to watch for the rest of 2014, including questions about what news sites should do about the market of Android users — which is bigger than the iOS market but less lucrative.

Joanna Geary, Twitter UK’s head of news, visited the Wall Street Journal in June to share tips on how to use Tweetdeck to gather news.… Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Facebook and Twitter Applications on Ipad

Social media roundup: Gawker, USA Today, LA Times open up with tips and insights

Automated tweets get less engagement than handcrafted ones, WhatsApp is making inroads at a USA Today sports site, and sometimes all you can do when a years-old piece takes off on Facebook is shrug.

It’s been a good week for gleaning insights from media outlets, which seem increasingly willing to share which social strategies are working for them. Here’s a rundown of recent social media news you might have missed:

Human tweets RSS tweets

Los Angeles Times social media editor Stacey Leasca shared some tips on Twitter’s media blog this week.

Among her insights was the fact that moving from RSS tweets improved engagement. It’s no surprise that a human touch makes a difference, but it’s interesting to see how much the change seems to have increased the rate at which the newspaper’s accounts are gaining new followers:

A perfect example of this is, again, @LANow.

Read more
Tools:
0 Comments