Articles about "USA Today"


Gannett

Gannett earnings strong, but publishing revenues continue a steep slide

FILE - This July 14, 2010 file photo shows the Gannett headquarters in McLean, Va. Gannett Co. reported Overall company revenue growth of 15 percent. The media company said, Monday, Oct. 20, 2014. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

FILE – This July 14, 2010 file photo shows the Gannett headquarters in McLean, Va. Gannett Co. reported Overall company revenue growth of 15 percent. The media company said, Monday, Oct. 20, 2014. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

Embedded in otherwise excellent third quarter financial results reported today by Gannett are some sobering numbers on the continuing decline of revenues for its newspaper division.

U.S publishing ad revenues year-to-date are down 6.3 percent. At Gannett, that difference is more than made up by booming broadcast operations and freestanding digital ventures like CareerBuilder.  So revenues for the entire company are up a healthy 13.4 percent.

But I also consider USA Today and Gannett’s 81 community newspapers a reasonable proxy for the entire newspaper industry, which has stopped reporting its financial results quarterly.  If the rest of the year is roughly in line, newspapers are on track again in 2014 to lose $1 billion-plus in advertising. Read more

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Here are 38 great journalism internships and fellowships for application season

For journalism students, October through January is internship application season, a pressure cooker of equal parts excitement and anxiety.

It’s our profession’s draft day. By mid-march, most of your classmates will have declared their intention to work at a journalism organization, like a prized NFL recruit putting on their team’s hat in front of a live studio audience.

Don’t get left behind. Some of the applications for the most prestigious news organizations are due in a few weeks time, so work up the courage to request that letter of recommendation, update your résumé and figure out how stamps work.

To make the process a little easier, I’ve compiled a list of some of the best journalism internships I could find on the Web, many of which I applied for myself when I was in school. If you have questions about this list or know some great internships I’ve forgotten, tweet them to #POYinternlist or send me an email: bmullin@poynter.org. Read more

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Earns Gannett

Gannett shifts some costs of USA Today layoffs to states

USA Today laid off about 70 people last month. Those who lost their jobs received a week of pay for every year of service, health care through the end of September and the vacation pay they’d already accrued for the year.

But as they turned in their laptops and cellphones, some USA Today journalists were surprised to find out who would pay a chunk of their farewell package: their state unemployment office.

USA Today is owned by Gannett, which doesn’t always pay laid-off workers a traditional severance. Instead, as in the case of the recent layoffs, it may provide a “transitional pay plan.” In one of these plans, Gannett, through a contractor called Total Management Solutions, makes up the difference between a worker’s old paycheck and their unemployment check for a certain amount of time.

Gannett didn’t make anyone available for an interview on this subject, but spokesperson Jeremy Gaines told Poynter in an email that “The Transitional Pay Plan (TPP) is one type of severance plan that Gannett offers. Read more

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Career Beat: Tom Knudson joins Center for Investigative Reporting

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Tom Knudson is now a senior reporter at The Center for Investigative Reporting. Previously he was a staff writer at The Sacramento Bee. (Center for Investigative Reporting)
  • Mark Smith will be mobile web editor for The Washington Post. Previously, he was senior manager of social media marketing at USA Today. (Washington Post)
  • Brian Gross will be deputy design director at The Washington Post. Currently, he’s lead senior designer there. Emmet Smith will be lead senior designer at The Washington Post. Previously, he was a senior designer there. (Washington Post)
  • Julia Cheiffetz is now executive editor at Dey Street Books. Previously, she was editorial director at Amazon. (@rachelsklar)
  • Stephen Collinson is now a senior enterprise reporter for CNN’s digital politics. Previously, he was a White House correspondent for Agence France-Presse. (Politico)
  • Matt Vella is now assistant managing editor at Time magazine.
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Games

Games are serious business at news organizations

Later this month, Gannett plans to debut a page on USA Today’s website with 70 free-to-play games.

The page will include brain training and arcade-style games, said John Geddes, the company’s first director of gaming, entertainment, and events.

“We feel that expanding our portfolio to include titantransline additional popular games such as solitaire, mahjong, and brain teasers is a huge opportunity to not only provide something new for that existing audience but for us to also attract waves of new users,” Geddes said.

Gannett is merely the latest media company to expand its games offerings. Several news organizations have acknowledged the increasing importance of games, whether for storytelling or diversion:

  • The Washington Post has pulled together an in-house team to develop a platform that will allow the newsroom to easily create quizzes, leaderboards and surveys, said Emilio Garcia-Ruiz, the paper’s managing editor for digital.
  • BuzzFeed — fresh from a $50 million infusion of capital from investment firm Andreessen Horowitz — has has created a small team of developers that will build games to be be paired alongside editorial content.
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Bloomberg makes exception to policy about employees who left

mediawiremorningGood morning after a day of never-ending media news. Here are at least 10 media stories.

  1. Hizzoner is back: Mike Bloomberg will return to run Bloomberg L.P., Andrew Ross Sorkin reports. Current Bloomberg honcho Daniel L. Doctoroff will depart by the end of the year. “If it was up to me, he would have stayed,” Bloomberg tells Sorkin. (NYT) | “Wait I thought when you leave Bloomberg you can’t ever come back?” (@kleinmatic) | Some context for that jape. (Inc.) | “With great pride and gratitude I’ll be turning the @Bloomberg reins back over to @MikeBloomberg at year’s end.” (@dandoctoroff) | Doctoroff explains why he’s leaving: “I have always viewed myself as Mike’s steward at the company. It is and has always been his company, and given his renewed interest, it is natural for him to reassume leadership of the company.” (Bloomberg) | The company “is facing competition from the financial firms that are its clients in areas like messaging.” (WSJ)
  2. USA Today lays off staff: Between 60 and 70 people lost their jobs yesterday.
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USA Today

USA Today lays off between 60 and 70 staffers

USA Today laid off between 60 and 70 staffers Wednesday, with about half those cuts hitting its newsroom, a company source tells Poynter.

Gannett, which owns USA Today, announced in August it plans to spin off its publishing business. At about the same time, some of Gannett’s local papers announced changes to their newsrooms. Tennessean Executive Editor Stefanie Murray told Poynter the plan was to have “self-sufficient reporters producing publication-ready copy.”

Gannett spokesperson Jeremy Gaines told Washington Business Journal reporter Drew Hansen that “USA TODAY is working to align its staffing levels to meet current market conditions. The actions taken today will allow USA TODAY to reinvest in the business to ensure the continued success of its digital transformation.”

Some people have sent emails to staffers saying they’re gone, including book reviewer and reporter Bob Minzesheimer, health and wellness reporter Michelle Healy and online producer John Elliot. Pop music critic Edna Gundersen tweeted that she was leaving. Read more

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Ferguson makes national and international front pages again

News from Ferguson, Missouri through the night told a markedly different story than it had since Saturday, when a police officer shot and killed Michael Brown. The change in the police force covering crowds of protesters, that crowd’s response and several vigils and protests around the country made news in and out of the U.S. Here are some of those front pages, courtesy, as always, Newsuem: Read more

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Newsrooms start thinking about wearables; USA Today has ‘Social Media Tuesdays’

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day):

— “I’m not sure how smart watches will help journalism per se, but I do see things like Google Glass and drones as having a big part to play,” Sydney Morning Herald innovation editor Stephen Hutcheon tells Julie Posetti in a PBS MediaShift rundown of mobile challenges for newsrooms.

— From Leslie Kaufman’s profile of USA Today and publisher Larry Kramer in The New York Times: “For Social Media Tuesdays, the staff must act as if there is no other way to get their articles except through sites likes Facebook and Reddit.”

— In Denmark, “legacy media are the prime way for accessing digital news,” Frédéric Filloux writes. “And since Danish media did well embracing new platforms, they enjoyed similarly success on social, funneling readers to their properties.”

— The password is over (if you want it). Read more

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Polk Awards

Did the government throw shade on latest Greenwald scoop?

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories. Also, from Sam Kirkland, your digital morning stuff, and from Kristen Hare, a look at journalism outside the U.S.

  1. Did the government try to stink up Glenn Greenwald’s latest story? The American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee’s national president, Samer Khalaf, says “It wasn’t that they were saying it was false. They were saying they can’t respond to a story that wasn’t out yet.” (The Washington Post) | The Intercept “began hearing about Justice Department officials attempting to discredit our story long before that [ADC] meeting took place.” (The Intercept) | Related: Bart Gellman answers objections to his latest NSA story, which he wrote with Julie Tate and Ashkan Soltani. (The Washington Post)
  2. Remembering John Seigenthaler, who died Friday: The Tennessean’s package | Former Poynter President Karen Dunlap remembers Seigenthaler. (Poynter) | Poynter will have some more Seigenthaler stuff today.
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