Articles about "User commenting"


Can Livefyre’s annotations tool fix commenting?

Livefyre wants to bring its social commenting system not only to every story on the Web, but also to every paragraph, block quote and image. With its new Sidenotes feature launching today at Salon and Fox Business, annotations — essentially paragraph-by-paragraph commenting — could be poised to go mainstream.



It's not a new concept: Many news outlets, including Poynter, have tested a service called ReadrBoard, and Quartz and Medium have notably developed their own in-the-margins commenting systems. News Genius got some attention lately for hosting an annotation-based rebuttal to Newsweek's controversial cover story on bitcoin's founder.

But Livefyre has more than 650 clients, with its social tools living on almost 100,000 sites. With that kind of scale, it hopes Sidenotes can be adopted quickly across the Web. (more...)
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Chicago Sun-Times homepage

Sun-Times kills comments until it can fix ‘morass of negativity, racism, and hate speech’

Chicago Sun-Times

The Chicago Sun-Times has temporarily eliminated story commenting on its website until it can develop a system that will "foster a productive discussion rather than an embarrassing mishmash of fringe ranting and ill-informed, shrill bomb-throwing," managing editor Craig Newman announced:

The world of Internet commenting offers a marvelous opportunity for discussion and the exchange of ideas. But as anyone who has ever ventured into a comment thread can attest, these forums too often turn into a morass of negativity, racism, hate speech and general trollish behaviors that detract from the content. In fact, the general tone and demeanor is one of the chief criticisms we hear in regard to the usability and quality of our websites and articles. Not only have we heard your criticisms, but we often find ourselves as frustrated as our readers are with the tone and quality of commentary on our pages.
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Opinion network State launches with goal of democratizing online conversations

Today marks the public launch of State, the “global opinion network” from Jawbone founder Alexander Asseily.

Sounds like just what the Internet needs, right? Another place for people you don’t know to opine about anything and everything.

But it’s … Read more

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HuffPost policy banishes trolls — and drives away some frequent commenters

When The Huffington Post announced that all commenters — not just new registrants — would be required starting Dec. 10 to link their profiles to Facebook accounts verified with a phone number and have their real names displayed when commenting, … Read more

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Poynter experiments with ReadrBoard reader comments

Poynter is experimenting with a new commenting and annotation tool, ReadrBoard, which allows users to chart their reactions by paragraph and leave comments inside a story.

You can tell which Poynter stories we’re testing with ReadrBoard by finding the … Read more

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Commenters on HuffPost mobile apps will soon need Facebook verification too

Amid the uproar over the Huffington Post's announcement that commenting now requires Facebook verification — which itself requires supplying Facebook with a phone number — some users found a loophole: They could still use their old usernames (and not their real names) when commenting via HuffPost mobile apps. (more...)
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Former publisher’s bill would have compelled newspapers to ID commenters

The Spokesman-Review
A panel in Idaho's legislature rejected a bill that would have forced newspapers to disclose the identities of commenters in the event of a lawsuit, Betsy Z. Russell reports in The Spokesman-Review. Last summer, Idaho Judge John Patrick Luster ordered The Spokesman-Review to reveal the name of a commenter after a Kootenai County politician sued the paper, saying she'd been libeled in a comments section in a blog post.

That commenter revealed herself before it came to that. But there's an interesting footnote to the story of the rejected bill: It was submitted by Rep. Stephen Hartgen, the former publisher of The Twin Falls (Idaho) Times-News. When a fellow representative asked Hartgen why the legislature needed to get involved in "rules within the judicial system,” Hartgen replied that Luster's ruling was "narrow." “This is an area of the law which has evolved to the point where anonymous blog comments are part of our daily life," Russell reports he said. (Here's a copy of his bill, which misstates the name of the politician whose suit inspired it, red meat for an anonymous commenter if I've ever seen it.) (more...)
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Early comments on stories affect what later readers believe, and what they say

A recent scientific experiment demonstrated the importance of intervening in comment sections to cultivate constructive discussion, particularly just after publication.

Scientific American Blog Editor Bora Zivkovic writes about the results, which showed that the tone of pre-existing comments on … Read more

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Seattle Times columnist can’t stand commenters, retires

Seattle Weekly
Seattle Times sports columnist Steve Kelley has standard reasons for retiring at 63: "I find myself at a lot more games thinking 'I've written this story 411 times now. Isn't that enough?'" he tells Seattle Weekly contributor Rick Anderson.

But another complaint puts him squarely in league with former Ohio Rep. Steve LaTourette and fans of science writing: ""The reader comments section, it's a free-for-all," Kelley said.

"The level of discourse has become so inane and nasty. And it's not just at the Times, it's ESPN, everywhere - people, anonymous people, take shots at the story, writers, each other. Whatever you've achieved in that story gets drowned out by this chorus of idiots."
Kelley says he won't write a farewell column. His last column will run near the end of January, Anderson says.
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Researchers: Online commenters impair readers’ scientific literacy

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
People who read newspaper and magazine reports on science "may be influenced as much by the comments at the end of the story as they are by the report itself," a study by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers says.

2,000 subjects who read "a balanced news report about nanotechnology" saw either civil or rowdy comments, Mark Johnson reports in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

"Disturbingly, readers' interpretations of potential risks associated with the technology described in the news article differed significantly depending only on the tone of the manipulated reader comments posted with the story," wrote authors Dominique Brossard and Dietram A. Scheufele.
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