ADVERTISEMENT

Verification

NEWS

4 factors that influence people's attitudes toward facts

The simple but frustrating truth is that facts alone are not enough to provide context and clarity for your audience. Even the most thorough, accurate piece of reporting might still be trumped by a poorly reasoned and false counterargument. Decades of research into the way humans process information and deal with misinformation and propaganda show that people are more inclined … Read More
NEWS

9 approaches to fact-checking and verification

Tools and technologies play a key role in verification. But traditional journalistic approaches remain essential. Be skeptical of everything that crosses your path, guard against assumptions and work with colleagues to bring fresh eyes to what you find. Here are some verification practices to apply: Develop human sources Be skeptical when something sounds too good to be true Consult credible … Read More
NEWS

9 questions that help you verify information

If you're publishing content, you have a responsibility to verify your information before you share it with others. But you don't have to be cynical and assume everything is wrong. Try being skeptical instead. Skepticism leads to better questions. It is the product of curiosity and critical thinking. Some of the best questions to ask before publishing information include: How … Read More
NEWS

9 questions to help you evaluate the credibility of news sources

Whether you're covering the news or reading/watching/hearing it, the credibility of your sources is key to evaluating the information. Do you trust the sources? Are there enough sources? Enough knowledgeable sources? Are all the questions answered? Is the news credible enough? Here are questions you should ask in evaluating the sources used in information you read, see and hear: Who … Read More
NEWS

Accuracy and verification in the digital age: the human factor in errors

If you ask a journalist how a particular mistake occurred, you might hear, "I was rushed and didn't check." Or, "I made a typo.” These are valid reasons, but they pertain only to a specific incident. To think an error is something we alone cause or control is to ignore the larger systems and factors at play. Saying that you … Read More
NEWS

Maligned gay marriage study: The far-reaching lessons for journalists

A now notorious study on same-sex marriage underscores a frequent newsroom reality: Political polling or a piece of academic research arrives and is by and large blindly passed along to readers, viewers and listeners. If it’s seemingly headline grabbing, like the derided study on whether gay canvassers could change voters' views in fundamental ways, the “news” value rises. And … Read More
NEWS

Amnesty International launches video verification tool, website

Amnesty International is in the verification game and that is good news for journalism. When journalists monitor and search social networks, they’re looking to discover and verify newsworthy content. Amnesty utilizes the same networks and content — but their goal is to gather and substantiate evidence of human rights abuses. “Verification and corroboration was always a key component of human … Read More
NEWS

Mobile trends to watch in second half of 2014; plus, a newsgathering guide to Tweetdeck

Here's our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day, and from Kristen Hare, a world roundup): — At Poynter, Adam Hochberg explores in depth Gannett's three-year CMS overhaul to "replace the existing systems and serve every Gannett newsroom – from … Read More
NEWS

Announcing the release of the free Verification Handbook

A little over a year ago, I suggested to colleagues at Poynter that I write an e-book about verification. It seemed to me an essential project, but also a reflection of the shift I've experienced in my focus for Regret the Error. When I first launched this blog as a standalone site in 2004, I was primarily finding and publishing corrections. Over time, I began to look at errors — their cause, prevalence and effect. In the past three years, perhaps in part due to the spread of social media, smartphones and viral news, I've found myself more and more focused on verification. With so much misinformation flowing fast and freely, and the ability for anyone to easily shoot, share and/or manipulate images and video, the skills of verification have never been more important. Yet it's not taught on an ongoing basis in most newsrooms. And it's not just journalists who need the skills and knowledge to sift real from fake — this is a basic, essential skill of news literacy. We all need it. It's about cultivating a mindset to question and scratch away at the surface of what we see, hear and read. Today, I'm proud to announce the publication of the free Verification Handbook. It provides news organizations and others with detailed and valuable guidance for verifying information. It's live today as a website and we will soon release the handbook as a PDF and Kindle book, along with an Arabic translation. (More languages will follow, along with a print edition.) Sign up at the website to be notified when the other versions are released. Read More
ADVERTISEMENT