Articles about "Visual journalism"


People are tired of bad infographics, so make good ones

Smashing Magazine | Gizmodo | How Interactive Design
The Internet fell in love with giant infographics for a while, but now a backlash is building. Jesus Diaz at Gizmodo pleads with us all to “Stop Already With [Freaking] InfographicsRead more

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iHeaven? Try iBuddhist; editorial cartoonists imagine Christian afterlife for Steve Jobs

The Cagle Post | ABC News
Daryl Cagle writes that all those cartoons portraying Steve Jobs in heaven are ironic, considering he was influenced so much by Buddhism: "We often see editorial cartoonists imposing Christian imagery on non-Christians when they die. (After all, only one religion can be right, huh?) Comedian George Carlin, a famous atheist, found a Christian heaven in many editorial cartoons. When Beatle George Harrison, a Hindu, died, the editorial cartoonists drew dozens of cartoons with George showing up in Christian heaven." Cartoons portraying Jobs in heaven were the most popular among the ones Cagle syndicates; he published several of them on his blog. || Related: Commenters criticize The New Yorker for its cover portraying Saint Peter checking Steve Jobs into heaven with an iPad.
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Idaho newspaper publishes prominent fact-check of senator’s press release

The Visual Side of Journalism
The Times-News of Twin Falls, Idaho ran a full-page illustration on its Sunday opinion section front that fact-checked, point-by-point, a press release from Republican Senator Mike Crapo.
This page appeared as a section front on the Sunday, Oct. 9 opinion section.
The newspaper tells readers that it gets dozens of press releases every day; before publishing them, "we also like to check all releases for both spin and accuracy before we publish them." In this release, Crapo's office announced legislation to cap the capital gains and dividend tax rate. The newspaper says the release's description of a "guaranteed" tax from the health care overhaul is a "half truth" because most people will never pay it. Crapo's office uses percentage increase figures that "sound pretty scary," one of which is calculated by assuming the highest tax rates, which don't apply to most people. And the release throws in a reference to farmers and ranchers that seems like a "heavy-handed way to pander to rural Idahoans" who generally aren't subject to the tax. The newspaper concludes that although the release is factual, "the data is also spun harder than it should be," and it calls on politicians to avoid "the most hyperbolic of methods to crunch statistics." || Related: PolitiFact asks its readers: Should ‘Barely True’ rating be changed to ‘Mostly False’?
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Data visualization ‘on another level’ compared to a few years ago

Forbes Wilson Andrews, The Washington Post's information designer, discusses his data visualizations and the progress of the field in a Forbes interview. "The kinds of graphics that are now being done, especially online, are on another level than what was being produced several years ago," he says. "Long form journalism is just as important as it ever was, but often long form pieces are greatly enhanced by smart and clear data visualization." He says that he starts with the simplest possible design, only adding movement and interactive elements if they will help people understand the information. Examples of his work are in the interview. Related: WNYC's John Keefe finished up his New York evacuation map as he rode the subway to work last week.
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Design firm Pentagram shows its signs of the (New York) Times

Pentagram
The design firm Pentagram notes that the documentary "Page One" features its work -- some of the 800 or so unusual signs that mark everything from conference rooms to bathrooms at The New York Times. In order to "reinforce the unique Times culture through as many details as possible ... every public room sign bears a different image culled from the paper’s immense photographic archive." Designers and Times archivists picked historic images, "and the designers selected images that wittily correlate to the function of each room." The full post has plenty of clever pairings of room functions and images, such as this:
Pentagram designers worked with Times archivists to select images that matched the function of rooms in the Times building. Pentagram also designed the sign on the Times building's Eighth Avenue facade.
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What tools can journalists use to improve their visual storytelling skills?

In this week’s career chat, we talked with Wasim Ahmad, an assistant professor of journalism at Stony Brook University. Ahmad has been an copy editor, photographer, Web editor and content producer, and he started Journographica — a site … Read more

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How to make searchable, Web-based Google charts

A lot of data visualization requires the technical expertise of a programmer and skills that take time and resources to develop.

A rise in free tools, however, has made it easier to make interactive graphs in charts, whether you’re a … Read more

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Beginner’s guide to using Photoshop in your newsroom

As an online editor at the Lawrence Journal World, part of my job is to constantly expand and adjust my skill set. I’m always looking for new tricks or technologies to learn and use in our news coverage. Until … Read more

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How to make a heat map in Google Fusion Tables

Online journalists are well aware of how important data can be to stories. But how do we give visual context to raw information without an army of developers at our disposal?

If the data has been normalized and saved as … Read more

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Newsweek redesign: Glad I didn’t judge it only by its cover…

I expected something a little edgier when I reached for the cover of the redesigned Newsweek on Monday. After all, the revamp came after the content merger with the magazine’s highly opinionated partner, The Daily Beast.

The Newsweek cover had … Read more

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