Wall Street Journal


The power shift in the Murdoch Empire: What it really means

News Corp. Exeuctive Chairman Rupert Murdoch, center, and his sons, Lachlan, left, and James Murdoch Rupert Murdoch, 84, is preparing to hand over the CEO job at Twenty-First Century Fox Inc. to his son, James, 42. Lachlan, 43, currently non-executive co-chairman at Fox, will become executive co-chairman along with his father. (Photo by Dan Steinberg/Invision/AP Images)

News Corp. Executive Chairman Rupert Murdoch, center, and his sons, Lachlan, left, and James Murdoch. Rupert Murdoch, 84, is preparing to hand over the CEO job at Twenty-First Century Fox Inc. to his son, James, 42. Lachlan, 43, currently non-executive co-chairman at Fox, will become executive co-chairman along with his father. (Photo by Dan Steinberg/Invision/AP Images)

What does the transition in power at 21st Century Fox actually mean?

What might happen to the newspapers Rupert Murdoch loves so dearly, including the Wall Street Journal and New York Post?

What is the relationship of the two sons, James, who will be the clear No. 1, and Lachlan? What might shareholders think of the clear diminution of Chase Carey, the current key non-family member in the hierarchy?

How does one really explain how James Murdoch, after essentially overseeing the outrageous phone hacking scandal at the News of the World in London, survives to now essentially take over a global media goliath? Read more


WSJ to relaunch Europe, Asia editions

The Guardian | Dow Jones

The Wall Street Journal announced Thursday that it will relaunch its Europe and Asia editions to create a global newspaper in the broadsheet format.

Dow Jones, citing a desire to “deliver a globally consistent and regionally relevant” experience to readers, will debut the full-color editions to cities around the world beginning in mid-September, according to the release. They’re aimed at the world’s financial centers, including London, Frankfurt, Hong Kong, Paris and Shanghai.

The new editions, currently published in the compact format, will be printed as broadsheets, according to the release. They will incorporate many of the standing features that distinguish the American edition of The Wall Street Journal, including the “What’s News,” and pages such as “Business & Tech.,” “Money & Investing” and “Opinion.”

The launch will be coordinated with the debut of the Journal’s forthcoming iPad app, with regional editions of that product available in areas where the paper is distributed. Read more


Career Beat: Lisa Arbetter named editor of StyleWatch

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Lisa Arbetter will be editor of StyleWatch. Previously, she was deputy editor of InStyle. (Time Inc.)
  • Jill Geisler has been named Loyola University’s Bill Plante Chair of Leadership and Media Integrity. She was a faculty member at Poynter for 16 years. (Poynter)
  • Anna Dickson will be deputy director of photography at The Wall Street Journal. Previously, she was photography director at The Huffington Post. (Mediabistro)
  • Eliot Pierce is now chief product officer at The New Republic. Previously, he was a consultant. (Poynter)

Job of the day: The Tampa Bay Times is looking for a general assignment reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more


Career Beat: Natasha Vargas-Cooper joins Jezebel

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Natasha Vargas-Cooper will be a senior reporter at Jezebel. Previously, she was a staff writer at The Intercept. (Capital)
  • Meredith Long will be publisher of Time magazine. Previously, she was executive director of West Coast operations. (Poynter)
  • Howard Fineman will be Global Editorial Director at The Huffington Post. Previously, he was an editorial director there. (Poynter)
  • Brian Barrett will launch a site with The Awl. Previously, he was editor of Gizmodo. (@brbarrett)
  • Annalee Newitz will run a new tech site at Gawker Media. She is the editor of i09. (Gigaom)
  • José Guzmán will be News Operations Manager at KDEN in Denver. Previously, he was a photographer there.
Read more

Career Beat: AP gets new global news manager for weekends

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • James Nord is now a political correspondent for The Associated Press. Previously, he was a political reporter at MinnPost. (AP)
  • Evan Berland is now global news manager for weekends at the AP. Previously, he was deputy editor for the eastern United States. (AP)
  • Mitra Kalita is now an adjunct faculty member at Poynter. She is Quartz’ ideas editor. (Poynter)
  • Catherine Gundersen is now managing editor of Marie Claire. She was editorial business manager at GQ. (Fishbowl NY)
  • Jacob Rascon is now a correspondent at NBC News. Previously, he was a reporter for KNBC in Los Angeles. (TV Spy)

Job of the day: The Wall Street Journal is looking for a banking editor. Read more


Mobile trends to watch in second half of 2014; plus, a newsgathering guide to Tweetdeck

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day, and from Kristen Hare, a world roundup):

— At Poynter, Adam Hochberg explores in depth Gannett’s three-year CMS overhaul to “replace the existing systems and serve every Gannett newsroom – from USA Today to KHOU-TV in Houston to the Fort Collins Coloradoan.”

Frédéric Filloux runs down three mobile trends to watch for the rest of 2014, including questions about what news sites should do about the market of Android users — which is bigger than the iOS market but less lucrative.

Joanna Geary, Twitter UK’s head of news, visited the Wall Street Journal in June to share tips on how to use Tweetdeck to gather news. Read more

This undated photo provided by Stack’s Bowers Galleries shows the first Pulitzer Prize for Public Service to ever come to auction. The 1932 Pulitzer was awarded to the now-defunct New York World-Telegram, and put up for auction in Baltimore on March 29, 2014, by the New York-based Stack’s Bowers Galleries. (AP Photo/Stack’s Bowers Galleries)

Pulitzer Preview: Snowden factor, and more on prize prospects for Monday

The Pulitzer Prize announcements shook with real-world drama last year, interrupted by reports of bombs exploding at the Boston Marathon finish line.

This coming Monday, though, expect another kind of drama: over whether blockbuster coverage of the shocking level of National Security Agency surveillance of Americans – coverage based on whistleblower Edward Snowden’s stolen top-secret documents – will win a Pulitzer for the U.S. website of the British-based Guardian, and perhaps The Washington Post as well.

Glenn Greenwald’s, Ewen MacAskill’s and Laura Poitras’ Guardian coverage, “The NSA Files,” has taken top honors from Scripps Howard, Investigative Reporters and Editors, the Online News Association and the Polk Awards, with the Polks adding Barton Gellman’s Post reporting of NSA data mining to its citation.

When the ONA announced its winners last October, it honored The Guardian with its Gannett Foundation Award for Watchdog Journalism. Read more

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On profanity: As language evolves, should the media?

The New York Times | The Wall Street Journal

On Sunday, Jesse Sheidlower wrote an op-ed piece for The New York Times making “The Case for Profanity in Print.”

Our society’s comfort level with offensive language and content has drastically shifted over the past few decades, but the stance of our news media has barely changed at all. Even when certain words are necessary to the understanding of a story, the media frequently resort to euphemisms or coy acrobatics that make stories read as if they were time capsules written decades ago, forcing us all into wink-wink-nudge-nudge territory. Even in this essay, I am unable to be clear about many of my examples.

Sheidlower, author of “The F-Word” and president of the American Dialect Society, wrote that often the words themselves are the story, and other times, they’re integral to the story itself. Read more

Mobile devices with touchscreen interface_depositphotos

News in motion: six ways to be a good mobile editor

So you want to be a mobile editor?

Or maybe you just got the gig. Congratulations! Now what?

I’ve heard that question a lot lately from newly minted mobile editors at organizations big and small. It’s not that surprising. Mobile has been the coming future of news and information for a long time, but many news outlets only woke up to its importance in the last year.

Why? That’s easy: 50 percent. Last year, many news organizations either hit or approached the 50 percent mark in digital traffic coming from mobile. That opened many eyes. It became very clear that mobile isn’t coming — it’s here. It’s been here. Mobile is now. And news organizations need mobile editors more than ever (read on for Six Ways To Be A Good Mobile Editor). Read more


A Wall Street Journal story about Philadelphia Eagles tight end Brent Celek features a correction that reveals the writer’s (and editors’) lack of hip-hop knowledge:

An earlier version incorrectly said Mr. Celek had Two Chairs on his playlist instead of 2 Chainz.

Hat tip to Deadspin for spotting it.

The Wall Street Journal

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