Articles about "Wall Street Journal"


Career Beat: AP gets new global news manager for weekends

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • James Nord is now a political correspondent for The Associated Press. Previously, he was a political reporter at MinnPost. (AP)
  • Evan Berland is now global news manager for weekends at the AP. Previously, he was deputy editor for the eastern United States. (AP)
  • Mitra Kalita is now an adjunct faculty member at Poynter. She is Quartz’ ideas editor. (Poynter)
  • Catherine Gundersen is now managing editor of Marie Claire. She was editorial business manager at GQ. (Fishbowl NY)
  • Jacob Rascon is now a correspondent at NBC News. Previously, he was a reporter for KNBC in Los Angeles. (TV Spy)

Job of the day: The Wall Street Journal is looking for a banking editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

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Mobile trends to watch in second half of 2014; plus, a newsgathering guide to Tweetdeck

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day, and from Kristen Hare, a world roundup):

— At Poynter, Adam Hochberg explores in depth Gannett’s three-year CMS overhaul to “replace the existing systems and serve every Gannett newsroom – from USA Today to KHOU-TV in Houston to the Fort Collins Coloradoan.”

Frédéric Filloux runs down three mobile trends to watch for the rest of 2014, including questions about what news sites should do about the market of Android users — which is bigger than the iOS market but less lucrative.

Joanna Geary, Twitter UK’s head of news, visited the Wall Street Journal in June to share tips on how to use Tweetdeck to gather news. Sarah Marshall turned them into a handy guide.

— Lots of executives have left Twitter lately, Mike Isaac and Vindu Goel write at The New York Times Bits blog, but the company has kept things stable in one area: its advertising team. Read more

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This undated photo provided by Stack’s Bowers Galleries shows the first Pulitzer Prize for Public Service to ever come to auction. The 1932 Pulitzer was awarded to the now-defunct New York World-Telegram, and put up for auction in Baltimore on March 29, 2014, by the New York-based Stack’s Bowers Galleries. (AP Photo/Stack’s Bowers Galleries)

Pulitzer Preview: Snowden factor, and more on prize prospects for Monday

The Pulitzer Prize announcements shook with real-world drama last year, interrupted by reports of bombs exploding at the Boston Marathon finish line.

This coming Monday, though, expect another kind of drama: over whether blockbuster coverage of the shocking level of National Security Agency surveillance of Americans – coverage based on whistleblower Edward Snowden’s stolen top-secret documents – will win a Pulitzer for the U.S. website of the British-based Guardian, and perhaps The Washington Post as well.

Glenn Greenwald’s, Ewen MacAskill’s and Laura Poitras’ Guardian coverage, “The NSA Files,” has taken top honors from Scripps Howard, Investigative Reporters and Editors, the Online News Association and the Polk Awards, with the Polks adding Barton Gellman’s Post reporting of NSA data mining to its citation.

When the ONA announced its winners last October, it honored The Guardian with its Gannett Foundation Award for Watchdog Journalism. But the real buzz about The Guardian’s and Post’s chances for a Pulitzer – perhaps in the Public Service category – escalated after the February announcement from Long Island University, which administers the Polks. Read more

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On profanity: As language evolves, should the media?

The New York Times | The Wall Street Journal

On Sunday, Jesse Sheidlower wrote an op-ed piece for The New York Times making “The Case for Profanity in Print.”

Our society’s comfort level with offensive language and content has drastically shifted over the past few decades, but the stance of our news media has barely changed at all. Even when certain words are necessary to the understanding of a story, the media frequently resort to euphemisms or coy acrobatics that make stories read as if they were time capsules written decades ago, forcing us all into wink-wink-nudge-nudge territory. Even in this essay, I am unable to be clear about many of my examples.

Sheidlower, author of “The F-Word” and president of the American Dialect Society, wrote that often the words themselves are the story, and other times, they’re integral to the story itself.

On Sunday, The Wall Street Journal’s “Style & Substance” covered the same issue, in part. Read more

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News in motion: six ways to be a good mobile editor

So you want to be a mobile editor?

Or maybe you just got the gig. Congratulations! Now what?

I’ve heard that question a lot lately from newly minted mobile editors at organizations big and small. It’s not that surprising. Mobile has been the coming future of news and information for a long time, but many news outlets only woke up to its importance in the last year.

Why? That’s easy: 50 percent. Last year, many news organizations either hit or approached the 50 percent mark in digital traffic coming from mobile. That opened many eyes. It became very clear that mobile isn’t coming — it’s here. It’s been here. Mobile is now. And news organizations need mobile editors more than ever (read on for Six Ways To Be A Good Mobile Editor).

I became The Wall Street Journal’s first — and, at the time, only — mobile editor in 2009. Mobile was different then. Read more

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A Wall Street Journal story about Philadelphia Eagles tight end Brent Celek features a correction that reveals the writer’s (and editors’) lack of hip-hop knowledge:

An earlier version incorrectly said Mr. Celek had Two Chairs on his playlist instead of 2 Chainz.

Hat tip to Deadspin for spotting it.

The Wall Street Journal

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Wall Street Journal reporter missing since Saturday

Wall Street Journal | USA Today | Daily Record

Wall Street Journal reporter David Bird has been missing since Saturday, the paper reported Wednesday evening.

Bird, 55, writes about energy markets and previously worked for the Associated Press, Jennifer Maloney reports. He lives in Long Hill Township, N.J.

Mr. Bird’s wife, Nancy Bird, said the couple was putting away Christmas decorations Saturday afternoon when Mr. Bird put on his red rain jacket and said he wanted to take a quick walk before an expected rainstorm. He left the house at 4:30 p.m. and didn’t take his phone.

Ms. Bird said her husband had been feeling under the weather with a gastrointestinal virus. He was starting to feel better, and she wasn’t surprised that he wanted to get some fresh air.

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China blocks The Guardian

The Guardian

The Guardian’s website has been blocked in China, according to a story Wednesday by Jonathan Kalman for The Guardian. Access to the newspaper’s site still worked on tablets and mobile devices, he reported, and some users wrote that they’d been able to access the page.

The reasons for the Guardian block are unclear – no China-related stories published by the Guardian in the past two days would obviously be perceived as dangerous by the country’s leadership. One article, published on 6 January, explores tensions in China’s ethnically-divided north-western region Xinjiang, but the Guardian has covered the subject before without any noticeable fallout.

On Monday, Reuters and the Wall Street Journal confirmed to Poynter that China unblocked Chinese-language versions of those two sites, which were first blocked in November. Read more

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WSJ launches AllThingsD replacement; new Mossberg/Swisher venture is called Re/code

WSJD | Re/code

The Wall Street Journal’s new technology site has beaten Walt Mossberg and Kara Swisher’s new venture to the web by a day. The Journal’s replacement for AllThingsD, a responsively designed tech portal (plus events, of course) is called WSJD, writes Jonathan Krim, global technology editor.

Mossberg and Swisher’s old AllThingsD team, meanwhile, will begin operation at midnight under the name Re/code in partnership with NBCUniversal. The two said their goodbyes at AllThingsD on Tuesday, and Mossberg published his final tech column earlier this month after 22 years with the Journal. Read more

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Mossberg signs off from WSJ with final personal-tech column

The Wall Street Journal

Walt Mossberg published his final column for The Wall Street Journal today, recapping the 22 years he has been at the newspaper with a list of major technology products that changed the digital world.

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