Articles about "War reporting"


New award named for AP photographer Anja Niedringhaus

The International Women's Media Foundation Tuesday announced a new award named in honor of the late Anja Niedringhaus, who died Friday, April 4, while working in Afghanistan.
The Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award will honor women photojournalists who "set themselves apart by their extraordinary bravery."
Created with a $1 million endowment gift from the Howard G. Buffett Foundation, the Award will be given annually to a woman photojournalist whose work follows in the footsteps of Anja Niedringhaus.

Niedringhaus who won the IWMF Courage in Journalism Award in 2005, spent her life documenting wars and the effects of conflict on people in war-torn regions. “I could have stayed out of trouble most of my life but always have been drawn to the people who suffer in difficult situations,” she told the audience at the 2005 Courage Awards ceremony.
On Saturday, the Associated Press honored Niedringhaus' life and work at her funeral in Germany.
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Afghan guards of honor carry wreaths with photographs of Agence France-Press journalist Sardar Ahmad, his wife Humaira and their children Nilofar and Omar during their funeral ceremony in Kabul, Afghanistan, Sunday, March 23, 2014. Sardar and his family were killed when four gunmen attacked the Serena hotel in Kabul during New Year's celebrations on March 20, 214. Nine people, including four foreigners were killed during the attack. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

Afghanistan journalists attempt a boycott after death of reporter

On Thursday, March 20, at a celebration of the Persian New Year in Kabul’s posh Serena Hotel, four young men attacked partygoers with small handguns they had smuggled through security, murdering nine civilians before they were killed by security forces.… Read more

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PoynterVision: War zone photographers a breed apart

Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus’ death in Afghanistan serves as another reminder of the deadly calling that war photography can be. Recently, Afghanistan has become a dangerous assignment “on par with the height of the Iraq war or the current … Read more

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The story of women in Afghanistan ‘must be told’

Journalist Zoreh Soleimani on the right in Afghanistan. (CIR)
In 2011, Iranian photojournalist Zohreh Soleimani walked into the offices of the Center for Investigative Reporting with the story of a young Afghan woman. Soleimani, then a fellow in the graduate journalism program at University of California, Berkley, first started reporting on the rights of women in Afghanistan after the Taliban fell in 2001. In 2011, she met Soheila, who was jailed for running away from an arranged marriage and having a relationship and a child with another man. The jail was filled with women in exactly the same circumstances. Every year since, Soleimani has returned to the offices of the CIR with more footage, more stories of women in Afghanistan and more on the life of Soheila, whose father and brother pledged to kill her. "Jailed for Love," part of Soleimani's story on Soheila, which has been guided along the way by CIR, airs Friday on PBS NewsHour. The 30-minute documentary Soleimani directed and produced in partnership with CIR, "To Kill a Sparrow," premiers this weekend in Paris at the 2014 European Independent Film Festival. (more...)
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APTOPIX Afghanistan Election

Anja Niedringhaus: Covering war ‘is the essence of journalism’

AP photographer Anja Niedringhaus was killed Friday in Afghanistan. In her 2012 book "At War," she wrote about her work, and Nieman Reports shared some of her words: "For me, covering conflict and war is the essence of journalism," Niedringhaus wrote.
My assignment, regardless of the era, is about people—civilians and soldiers. The legacy of any photographer is her or his ability to capture the moment, to record history. For me it is about showing the struggle and survival of the individual. Conflict is not all that I cover. I like the Olympics and the World Cup. In sports, there is a start and a finish. With war, the story never ends. It keeps me coming back.
Here are some of Niedringhaus' photos from Afghanistan from the last week.
An Afghan girl helps her brother down from a security barrier set up outside the Independent Election Commission (IEC) office in the eastern Afghan city of Khost, Thursday, April 3, 2014. Afghans go to the polls to elect a new President on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
A child pulls a rope which keeps Afghan women in line queuing to get their registration card on the last day of voter registration for the upcoming presidential elections outside a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Elections will take place on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
An Afghan man shouts in support for presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani Ahmadza as he arrives with others for an election campaign rally to the stadium in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Elections will take place on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
An Afghan man waits to have his picture taken for his registration card on the last day of voter registration for the upcoming presidential elections outside a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Elections will take place on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
An Afghan soldier, left, and a policeman peek through a window as they queue with others to get their registration card on the last day of voter registration for the upcoming presidential elections outside a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Elections will take place on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
An Afghan woman sits on destroyed school benches as she waits to get her registration card on the last day of voter registration for the upcoming presidential elections outside a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Elections will take place on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
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Reuters uses activists as photographers in Syria

The New York Times
Reuters employs rebel activists and "in one case a spokesman" as photographers in Syria, James Estrin and Karam Shoumali write. In interviews with photographers there, they say there are more issues with the wire service's practices:

Three [photographers] also said that the freelancers had provided Reuters with images that were staged or improperly credited, sometimes under pseudonyms. And while Reuters has given the local stringers protective vests and helmets, most said that the stringers lacked training in personal safety and first aid.
(more...)
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Journalist Austin Tice has been missing for over a year. (AP Photo/Family of Austin Tice)

In 2013, 87 journalists were kidnapped around the world

The Daily Star | The Huffington Post | RWB | CPJ Bunyamin Aygun, a Turkish photographer working in Syria, has been missing for two weeks, according to a report in The Daily Star, a Lebanese publication. Aygun's newspaper, The Milliyet, said Tuesday they hadn't heard from him at all in that time, but The Daily Star reports that "some media outlets said he had been kidnapped by Al-Qaeda affiliates in Syria." For 2013, 87 journalists have been kidnapped around the world, according to a report Wednesday from Reporters Without Borders. That number marks a 129% rise from the year before. In November, RWB declared Syria "the world’s most dangerous country for journalists." (more...)
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News organizations ask Syrian rebels to halt journalist kidnappings

The Atlantic | Committee to Protect Journalists
Thirteen news organizations have called on the Syrian opposition to help curtail "a disturbing rise" in kidnappings of journalists that have reduced coverage of the civil war.

In a letter isssued today, the groups said by its count more than 30 journalists are being held. The kidnappings have occurred in the northern provinces of Aleppo, Idlib and al-Raqqa and elsewhere in Syria:
As a result of these kidnappings, a growing number of news organizations no longer feel that it is safe for their reporters and photographers to enter Syria, and many have decided to limit their coverage of the war, unwilling to have their staff members subjected to the increasingly common risk of abduction.
The news organizations signing the letter include Agence France-Presse, The Associated Press, Atlantic Media, BBC News, The Economist, Getty Images, The Guardian, The Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, Reuters, The Telegraph, The Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post.

While the kidnappings continue, the news outlets wrote, journalists will not be willing to take assignments in Syria and "will no longer be able to serve as witnesses to the events taking place within Syria's borders."
We believe it is imperative for the leadership of the armed opposition to commit itself to assuring that journalists can work within Syria, secure from the threat of kidnapping. Among other things, we ask the leadership to assist in identifying those groups currently holding journalists and take the steps necessary to bring about their release.
The Atlantic recapped the recent kidnappings:
Just in the last few weeks, we've learned that two Swedish journalists were abducted near the Lebanese border, two Spanish journalists were kidnapped by al Qaeda-affiliated fighters in the northern province of Raqqa, and an Iraqi cameraman was executed by the same jihadi group in the northern province of Idlib.
The Committee to Protect Journalists ranks Syria as the most dangerous country for journalists. The organization reports that 53 journalists have been killed in Syria since 1992.
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AP reporter: Search for Mali bodies not how a ‘journalist normally operates’

Rukmini Callimachi was working in a hotel restaurant in Timbuktu when her colleague Baba Ahmed returned from a trip into the desert. "J'ai besoin d’argent pour acheter une pelle," he told her: I need money to buy a shovel.

It was February, and they had spent most of their trip to the city in northern Mali scouring abandoned government buildings for documents left behind by a vanquished al-Qaida-backed government.

But Ahmed, a native of the area and AP's Mali correspondent, had gone for a drive while Callimachi typed a draft based on what they'd found. When his car got stuck in the sand, children came to help him, and they pointed to a buried body in a shallow grave nearby.

Callimachi, AP's West Africa bureau chief, and Ahmed bought a shovel at a local market and headed out to the spot. "That was the first of many moments when I thought, 'What am I doing? Is this OK?'" Callimachi said in a phone call with Poynter. "This is not really the way a journalist normally operates." (more...)
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AP reporter finds bodies in Malian desert

Associated Press
Associated Press West Africa bureau chief Rukmini Callimachi and her colleagues spent six months tracking down "what we would rather not have found: six bodies in the desert, including that of a 70-year-old grandfather who had become a symbol of the killings," she writes.

There have been many reports of the Malian military's involvement in the disappearance of Arab or Tuareg people after it reclaimed control of the country's north from an occupation led by Al-Qaida. Callimachi was following a story she'd heard about a man named "Vieux" Ali Ould Kabbad who'd disappeared.

A source in Mali's military pointed Callimachi toward two bodies. A shepherd led her to two more. (more...)
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