Articles about "War reporting"


Freelance reporters in war zones can earn crappy pay

NBC News | The Daily Beast

Major media organizations may not pay freelancers in war zones very well, Martha C. White reports: “Per story can range anywhere from 50 bucks to several hundred,” a freelancer named Steven Dorsey tells her.

“I get paid more to do a PR job in the U.K. than to go somewhere like Gaza,” photojournalist Alison Baskerville tells White. “In Gaza, I’d be lucky to get 300 pounds [$483 U.S.] a day, maybe less. It’s a daily rate.”

Freelancers often have to provide their own body armor and other protective devices, and some news orgs don’t provide health insurance. “I remember trying to get affordable insurance through international reporting organizations — and couldn’t, because I was an American. It would only cover you if you were Canadian or European,” Dorsey tells White.

Ben Taub wrote on Sept. 2 about how a fixer employed by murdered American freelance journalist Steven Sotloff may have had his identity compromised by a Canadian photographer. Read more

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Forecast: Digital ad revenue to jump 17% this year, magazine ad revenue to fall 11%

mediawiremorningWednesday already? Here we go.

  1. Digital ad revenue to pass TV in 2017: According to Magna Global forecasts, “television revenues are expected to grow 2.2% this year,” Nathalie Tadena writes. “Newspaper and magazine ad revenue are expected to decline 8.9% and 11% respectively, while digital ad revenues are expected to jump 17% this year to $50 billion.” (The Wall Street Journal) | “The research firm declared digital ad revenue will hit $72 billion by 2017, pulling slightly ahead of television at $70.5 billion.” (The Wrap)
  2. The perils of freelance war reporting: GlobalPost went “above and beyond” in working for James Foley’s release before he was killed by Islamic State militants, according to Medill’s Ellen Shearer. “But other freelancers may not get that kind of backing or have access to the infrastructure that a staff journalist would, she said.” (AP via NYT) | Freelance journalist Austin Tice, who has been missing for two years, is believed to be held by the Syrian government, Lara Jakes reports.
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AP journalist and translator killed in Gaza

Simone Camilli in Beit Lahiya on Monday. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

Simone Camilli in Beit Lahiya on Monday. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. AP journalist and translator killed, photographer injured in Gaza: Simone Camilli and translator Ali Shehda Abu Afash “died Wednesday when Gaza police engineers were neutralizing unexploded ordnance in the Gaza town of Beit Lahiya left over from fighting between Israel and Islamic militants.” AP photographer Hatem Moussa was seriously injured in the explosion. (AP) | Moussa got AP’s “Beat of the Week” nod last month. (APME)
  2. Is there a second Snowden? James Bamford writes that he got “unrestricted access to [Edward Snowden's] cache of documents in various locations. And going through this archive using a sophisticated digital search tool, I could not find some of the documents that have made their way into public view, leading me to conclude that there must be a second leaker somewhere.” (Wired) | Related: What it’s like to do a photoshoot with Snowden.
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Vietnam Napalm 1972

Nick Ut’s ‘napalm girl’ photo was published 42 years ago

People | PetaPixel

Associated Press photographer Nick Ut took a photo of children running from a botched napalm attack on June 8, 1972. “I thought she was going to die,” he tells Nate Jones about Kim Phuc, the naked girl in the center of the photo.

Ut’s famous photo shows children, including Kim Phuc, center, running down a highway after a South Vietnamese plane accidentally dropped napalm on civilians. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

Ut got Kim Phuc and other children admitted to a hospital using his media pass, Jones writes. Phuc “was very upset about the picture,” the photographer said. Eventually her fame “paid off,” Jones writes: “The government allowed her to go to school in Cuba, where she fell in love with another Vietnamese student. In 1992, coming back from their honeymoon, the newly married couple sought asylum in Canada. Today Phuc is a United Nations Goodwill Ambassador living in Ontario with her husband and their two sons.” She and Ut, who won a Pulitzer Prize for the photo, remain in touch. Read more

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‘Hornet’s Nest’: Memorial Day war movie by father and son journalists opens

The trailer for Mike and Carlos Boettcher’s new movie “The Hornet’s Nest” that opens in theaters nationwide today says right up front the film is “Not based on a true story.” Then a second message appears on the screen, “This is the true story.”

“The Hornet’s Nest” is a movie with no actors. The shooting, the fear, the loneliness, the bleeding, the dying is all real. “The Hornet’s Nest” is the product of two journalists, a father and a son who risked their lives and spent their own money to tell the stories of soldiers and Marines and their families involved in America’s longest wars.

Mike Boettcher is one of network television’s most experienced war correspondents. In 1985, he was kidnapped and threatened with execution in El Salvador. He survived a roadside bombing in Baghdad. He covered the U.S. Marine barracks bombing in Lebanon and the fighting in Kosovo. He has reported for NBC, CNN and ABC. Read more

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Vice devotes entire issue to South Sudan

Vice cover image by Tim Freccia

Editors at Vice didn’t plan on giving an entire issue to one story about South Sudan. But then that story, photographs and video came in.

“And it was so good,” said Annette Lamothe-Ramos, Vice’s creative director, in a phone interview with Poynter. “And we realized we needed an entire issue for this.”

“Saving South Sudan” came out in late April in print and went online Monday. In more than 100 pages it tells the story of writer Robert Young Pelton and photographer and filmmaker Tim Freccia’s trip into South Sudan. Pelton, author of the book “The World’s Most Dangerous Places,” has worked for National Geographic and CNN, among many others. For Vice, he weaves his story between narrative and history.

It started as a simple idea: visit the world’s newest country with Machot Lat Thiep, a gangly 32-year-old Sudanese former Lost Boy who wants to help his nation, a homeland that is less than three years old and already in danger of becoming a failed state.

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Time correspondent Simon Shuster tells the story of his abduction near Konstantinovka, in Ukraine, recently. He was stopped at a checkpoint where a man “pulled me from the car and cracked me on the head with the butt of his pistol.”

About half of his buddies got nervous, even sympathetic, when they saw the blood running down my face, and a few even ran to bring me some tissues. Maybe these were meant to be the peaceful citizens struggling for their rights. For a while, they bickered about what to do with me before calling their commander, a lanky man in camouflage named Vanya, who soon drove up with a long-barrel shotgun and a bandolier of red shells across his chest. “You’re screwed now,” one of his men whispered at me.

But on the ride back to his headquarters in the town of Kramatorsk, inside the occupied city hall, Vanya apologized for the beating. “We’re at war here,” he offered as an explanation. “We’re in a military situation.”

Simon Shuster, Time

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New award named for AP photographer Anja Niedringhaus

The International Women’s Media Foundation Tuesday announced a new award named in honor of the late Anja Niedringhaus, who died Friday, April 4, while working in Afghanistan.

The Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award will honor women photojournalists who “set themselves apart by their extraordinary bravery.”

Created with a $1 million endowment gift from the Howard G. Buffett Foundation, the Award will be given annually to a woman photojournalist whose work follows in the footsteps of Anja Niedringhaus.

Niedringhaus who won the IWMF Courage in Journalism Award in 2005, spent her life documenting wars and the effects of conflict on people in war-torn regions. “I could have stayed out of trouble most of my life but always have been drawn to the people who suffer in difficult situations,” she told the audience at the 2005 Courage Awards ceremony.

On Saturday, the Associated Press honored Niedringhaus’ life and work at her funeral in Germany. Read more

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Afghan guards of honor carry wreaths with photographs of Agence France-Press journalist Sardar Ahmad, his wife Humaira and their children Nilofar and Omar during their funeral ceremony in Kabul, Afghanistan, Sunday, March 23, 2014. Sardar and his family were killed when four gunmen attacked the Serena hotel in Kabul during New Year's celebrations on March 20, 214. Nine people, including four foreigners were killed during the attack. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

Afghanistan journalists attempt a boycott after death of reporter

On Thursday, March 20, at a celebration of the Persian New Year in Kabul’s posh Serena Hotel, four young men attacked partygoers with small handguns they had smuggled through security, murdering nine civilians before they were killed by security forces.

Among the first to fall was Sardar Ahmad, a veteran journalist with Agence France-Presse, who was killed along with his wife and two of their three children. For Afghan journalists, the attack – one of several claimed by the Taliban in the past few weeks as the country prepared for its presidential election – was too much to bear.

Tributes appeared on the websites of media outlets around the globe, and hundreds braved a downpour to attend his funeral. The day after the attack, a group calling itself “the gathering of Afghan journalists” issued a statement announcing its intention to boycott the Taliban for fifteen days. Although the initial statement did not list participating journalists and organizations, few domestic media outlets have run any quotes from Taliban spokespersons in the past two weeks. Read more

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PoynterVision: War zone photographers a breed apart

Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus’ death in Afghanistan serves as another reminder of the deadly calling that war photography can be. Recently, Afghanistan has become a dangerous assignment “on par with the height of the Iraq war or the current situation in Syria,” said Bob Dietz, Asia program coordinator of the Committee to Protect Journalists.

Niedringhaus and her colleague, reporter Kathy Gannon, were shot by an Afghan police officer while they sat in a car that was part of a convoy monitoring the country’s elections. Niedringhaus died; Gannon was badly wounded, but reported Friday in stable condition.

Just last month, on March 11, Swedish journalist Nils Horner was shot at point-blank range while reporting in Kabul. Ten days later, four gunmen fired weapons in a Kabul hotel restaurant and killed Afghan journalist Sardar Ahmad.

“Where once reporters and photographers were seen as the impartial eyes and ears of crucial information, today they are often targets,” said Associated Press CEO Gary Pruitt. Read more

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