Articles about "War reporting"


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The story of women in Afghanistan ‘must be told’

Journalist Zoreh Soleimani on the right in Afghanistan. (CIR)

In 2011, Iranian photojournalist Zohreh Soleimani walked into the offices of the Center for Investigative Reporting with the story of a young Afghan woman.

Soleimani, then a fellow in the graduate journalism program at University of California, Berkley, first started reporting on the rights of women in Afghanistan after the Taliban fell in 2001. In 2011, she met Soheila, who was jailed for running away from an arranged marriage and having a relationship and a child with another man. The jail was filled with women in exactly the same circumstances.

Every year since, Soleimani has returned to the offices of the CIR with more footage, more stories of women in Afghanistan and more on the life of Soheila, whose father and brother pledged to kill her.

“Jailed for Love,” part of Soleimani’s story on Soheila, which has been guided along the way by CIR, airs Friday on PBS NewsHour. The 30-minute documentary Soleimani directed and produced in partnership with CIR, “To Kill a Sparrow,” premiers this weekend in Paris at the 2014 European Independent Film Festival.

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APTOPIX Afghanistan Election

Anja Niedringhaus: Covering war ‘is the essence of journalism’

AP photographer Anja Niedringhaus was killed Friday in Afghanistan. In her 2012 book “At War,” she wrote about her work, and Nieman Reports shared some of her words: “For me, covering conflict and war is the essence of journalism,” Niedringhaus wrote.

My assignment, regardless of the era, is about people—civilians and soldiers. The legacy of any photographer is her or his ability to capture the moment, to record history. For me it is about showing the struggle and survival of the individual.

Conflict is not all that I cover. I like the Olympics and the World Cup. In sports, there is a start and a finish. With war, the story never ends. It keeps me coming back.

Here are some of Niedringhaus’ photos from Afghanistan from the last week.

An Afghan girl helps her brother down from a security barrier set up outside the Independent Election Commission (IEC) office in the eastern Afghan city of Khost, Thursday, April 3, 2014. Afghans go to the polls to elect a new President on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
A child pulls a rope which keeps Afghan women in line queuing to get their registration card on the last day of voter registration for the upcoming presidential elections outside a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Elections will take place on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
An Afghan man shouts in support for presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani Ahmadza as he arrives with others for an election campaign rally to the stadium in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Elections will take place on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
An Afghan man waits to have his picture taken for his registration card on the last day of voter registration for the upcoming presidential elections outside a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Elections will take place on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
An Afghan soldier, left, and a policeman peek through a window as they queue with others to get their registration card on the last day of voter registration for the upcoming presidential elections outside a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Elections will take place on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
An Afghan woman sits on destroyed school benches as she waits to get her registration card on the last day of voter registration for the upcoming presidential elections outside a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Elections will take place on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
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Reuters uses activists as photographers in Syria

The New York Times

Reuters employs rebel activists and “in one case a spokesman” as photographers in Syria, James Estrin and Karam Shoumali write. In interviews with photographers there, they say there are more issues with the wire service’s practices:

Three [photographers] also said that the freelancers had provided Reuters with images that were staged or improperly credited, sometimes under pseudonyms. And while Reuters has given the local stringers protective vests and helmets, most said that the stringers lacked training in personal safety and first aid.

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Journalist Austin Tice has been missing for over a year. (AP Photo/Family of Austin Tice)

In 2013, 87 journalists were kidnapped around the world

The Daily Star | The Huffington Post | RWB | CPJ

Bunyamin Aygun, a Turkish photographer working in Syria, has been missing for two weeks, according to a report in The Daily Star, a Lebanese publication. Aygun’s newspaper, The Milliyet, said Tuesday they hadn’t heard from him at all in that time, but The Daily Star reports that “some media outlets said he had been kidnapped by Al-Qaeda affiliates in Syria.”

For 2013, 87 journalists have been kidnapped around the world, according to a report Wednesday from Reporters Without Borders. That number marks a 129% rise from the year before.

In November, RWB declared Syria “the world’s most dangerous country for journalists.” Read more

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News organizations ask Syrian rebels to halt journalist kidnappings

The Atlantic | Committee to Protect Journalists

Thirteen news organizations have called on the Syrian opposition to help curtail “a disturbing rise” in kidnappings of journalists that have reduced coverage of the civil war.

In a letter isssued today, the groups said by its count more than 30 journalists are being held. The kidnappings have occurred in the northern provinces of Aleppo, Idlib and al-Raqqa and elsewhere in Syria:

As a result of these kidnappings, a growing number of news organizations no longer feel that it is safe for their reporters and photographers to enter Syria, and many have decided to limit their coverage of the war, unwilling to have their staff members subjected to the increasingly common risk of abduction.

The news organizations signing the letter include Agence France-Presse, The Associated Press, Atlantic Media, BBC News, The Economist, Getty Images, The Guardian, The Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, Reuters, The Telegraph, The Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post.

While the kidnappings continue, the news outlets wrote, journalists will not be willing to take assignments in Syria and “will no longer be able to serve as witnesses to the events taking place within Syria’s borders.”

We believe it is imperative for the leadership of the armed opposition to commit itself to assuring that journalists can work within Syria, secure from the threat of kidnapping. Among other things, we ask the leadership to assist in identifying those groups currently holding journalists and take the steps necessary to bring about their release.

The Atlantic recapped the recent kidnappings:

Just in the last few weeks, we’ve learned that two Swedish journalists were abducted near the Lebanese border, two Spanish journalists were kidnapped by al Qaeda-affiliated fighters in the northern province of Raqqa, and an Iraqi cameraman was executed by the same jihadi group in the northern province of Idlib.

The Committee to Protect Journalists ranks Syria as the most dangerous country for journalists. The organization reports that 53 journalists have been killed in Syria since 1992. Read more

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callimachi-ap

AP reporter: Search for Mali bodies not how a ‘journalist normally operates’

Rukmini Callimachi was working in a hotel restaurant in Timbuktu when her colleague Baba Ahmed returned from a trip into the desert. “J’ai besoin d’argent pour acheter une pelle,” he told her: I need money to buy a shovel.

It was February, and they had spent most of their trip to the city in northern Mali scouring abandoned government buildings for documents left behind by a vanquished al-Qaida-backed government.

But Ahmed, a native of the area and AP’s Mali correspondent, had gone for a drive while Callimachi typed a draft based on what they’d found. When his car got stuck in the sand, children came to help him, and they pointed to a buried body in a shallow grave nearby.

Callimachi, AP’s West Africa bureau chief, and Ahmed bought a shovel at a local market and headed out to the spot. “That was the first of many moments when I thought, ‘What am I doing? Is this OK?’” Callimachi said in a phone call with Poynter. “This is not really the way a journalist normally operates.” Read more

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AP reporter finds bodies in Malian desert

Associated Press

Associated Press West Africa bureau chief Rukmini Callimachi and her colleagues spent six months tracking down “what we would rather not have found: six bodies in the desert, including that of a 70-year-old grandfather who had become a symbol of the killings,” she writes.

There have been many reports of the Malian military’s involvement in the disappearance of Arab or Tuareg people after it reclaimed control of the country’s north from an occupation led by Al-Qaida. Callimachi was following a story she’d heard about a man named “Vieux” Ali Ould Kabbad who’d disappeared.

A source in Mali’s military pointed Callimachi toward two bodies. A shepherd led her to two more. Read more

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Swedish journalists abducted in Syria may have lacked proper visas

The Local | Associated Press

Swedish journalists Magnus Falkehed and Niclas Hammarström “are experienced journalists and they know that they cannot move about in a regime-controlled area without a visa,” Kassem Hamadé, a reporter for the Swedish newspaper Expressen, tells The Local. Falkehed and Hammarström were abducted Saturday as they tried to leave Syria. Read more

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Journalist James Foley in 2011 (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)

James Foley has been missing for a year

GlobalPost | Committee to Protect Journalists | Associated Press | The Daily Northwestern | The Atlantic

Friday marked one year since American freelance journalist James Foley went missing in Syria.

“In order to preserve the security of our investigation, we’ve been unable to share much detailed information with the public or even with the GlobalPost family,” writes Philip Balboni, GlobalPost’s CEO and president. “But please know that our search for Jim has not slowed and that there are important leads being actively pursued even at this moment.”

Foley in 2011 (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
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Occupy Oakland

Journalists under attack: Pros offer safety advice

Look at this page on the Committee to Protect Journalists’ website and feel a pain in your gut. The site documents the 45 journalists who have been killed on the job worldwide this year. Most were covering human rights, politics and/or crime when they died.

If you think the only journalists who face danger on the job are those working in Syria or Egypt, you’re wrong. Last week, WDAZ reporter Adam Ladwig was attacked by three people while covering a fire. Last month, a woman attacked a WUSA9 crew. A CBS2/KCAL9 reporter and photojournalist were attacked while covering the Zimmerman verdict protests in July. In August, Poynter.org told you about the San Francisco area attacks on news crews. In a six-week period, thieves attacked journalists six times, targeting cameras, computers and tripods and taking gear at gunpoint in at least one case. In 2011, journalists across the country said they were attacked by both crowds and police while covering the “Occupy” protests.

I turned to seasoned reporters and photojournalists and to the Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma for advice on how to stay safe and still get your job done. (Their answers have been edited for clarity and length.)

I asked my questions of:

What advice do you have about how to stay safe and still get the job done?

French

Lynn French, KPNX-TV Phoenix: Even though it feels a little “Mother may I?”, I always let the assignment desk or someone in my department know where I am going and when I should be back. It sounds simple, but journalists are independent by nature and have to fight the urge to just run out the door and hope for the best. No matter where I am going, I have my phone on me and location services turned on so if worst came to worst the newsroom could track my phone for evidence. If I am going into a tense situation, especially a door knock, I will call someone at the station to stay on the phone with me and I will tuck my phone somewhere where they can hear me (Arizona is a one-party state). And they know the exact address I am at so if things turn bad they can call the police and I can concentrate on getting to safety.

Shapiro

Bruce Shapiro, Dart Center for Trauma & Journalism: Even local journalists need to be aware of a potentially hostile environment, and pay attention both to the vulnerabilities we share with other citizens and the special risks which may be involved in our work. Anyone should worry, for instance, about being alone on a dark street. On the other hand, a journalist may also need to worry about being mistaken for law enforcement or some other unwanted presence, may be knocking on doors or taking photos in a community that has felt badly treated by media in the past, or may be displaying technology that makes us a target.

Adkins

Richard Adkins, WRAL-TV Raleigh: Knowledge is more than power — knowledge is armor. Know your surroundings and your way around. In the rush to the scene of  breaking news, pay attention to how you got there. What was the road/intersection where you parked your vehicle? Remember the street names. If you need to call 911 on your cell, could you give your exact location? I’m amazed at how often a reporter turns to me and asks, “Where are we?” If I’m working with a reporter at an active scene, the first thing I do is give the reporter my wireless microphone and turn it on — that way while I’m shooting video I can keep track of the reporter, who may go knocking on doors or talking with gathering crowds. This not only helps with safety, but also lets me come running if the reporter finds a great interview.

Pitts

Byron Pitts, ABC News: Pack the best first-aid kit possible. Get certified in basic first aid and CPR. I always carry a bandana, flashlights, local map and contact numbers. I also have a get-out-of jail card — either a note or phone number from the most important person in that part of the world I know. A colleague asked me once, “How much blood are you bringing?” There are places in the world where that is a legitimate question. Read, read, read. And always pray, pray, pray. But at the end of the day none of that may be enough — sometimes the best reporting is not going and telling the story another way.

What are the key things to never do and always do?

French: The No. 1 thing to never do is play the “Don’t you know who I am?” card. I have watched reporters do this time and time again in heated situations and not once has the other party stepped back and said, “Oh, I love your newscast, by all means proceed.” The desperation behind their motives is far greater than the stature you believe your organization has in the community. Something I learned from wildfire training is to always have an escape route. I try to stay close to my vehicle or have a place to flee to where someone can call for help. I am always looking for security cameras on buildings and ATMs, so that if something is going to happen, at least it is caught on someone else’s camera. And even though it is a competitive environment, when it comes to some situations there’s safety in numbers.

Pitts: The “ugly American” thing never works. Be kind. Be kind. Be kind to all you meet.

Adkins: Probably the most important advice I can give is for people to speak up. Don’t be afraid to tell the assignment desk when you have concerns for your safety — especially if you are working alone. The desk may give you an address that’s just a street with numbers to them, but you may know it’s an area with issues. Speak up — tell them that’s not a safe area. In the field, get out if you feel threatened — don’t wait for the situation to escalate. Always have an escape plan.

French: I just try to stay calm and aware, which is much tougher to do than it sounds. If someone asks why I’m there shooting video — especially if they have an edge of contention about them — I’m honest but don’t give any details other than the headline of the story. A little perceived ignorance can go a long way toward keeping the situation calm. If someone prods for more details on the story and it’s not apparent how they are attached to it, I’m apt to shrug my shoulders and say, “I was just told to get some shots of this building, I think it’s for tonight’s newscast. Do you know what goes on here that might help me understand why I’m here?” If someone asks me how much my gear is worth, again I play ignorant: “This stuff? It’s pretty old. It’s like cars — the value decreases really fast. We’re really the last ones using this old format.”

If you are working alone, does that change things?

Adkins: I often work alone. A while back I was shooting video along Oregon Inlet. I stepped wrong and one leg went into a hole up to my waist while the other leg went 90 degrees out to my left, a gymnastic move I had never practiced. I was stuck, couldn’t free myself and could feel blood running down my leg. Luckily a couple of guys fishing nearby saw me and came to help. While I was being stitched up at the local Urgent Care, I knew that from now on someone needed to keep tabs on me while I was out. The assignment desk is too busy, so we enabled my phone for my wife to keep up with me via GPS. I also text her where I am and where I’m going. If too long passes without her hearing from me she will call and check on me.

French: Working alone absolutely changes things. Other than your camera, there are no witnesses who have your back. When I am working alone, I roll tape on every interaction and whenever my Spidey sense tingles. While nothing may come of the interaction in the moment, it has helped me prove my conduct was proper when someone has called the news director after the fact to say I was trespassing or being unprofessional. If a situation feels bad, I trust my gut and treat it as a dangerous situation. That may include not advancing into the scene as fast as I normally would, calling the desk to alert them that my safety is in question, or finding an alternative way to cover the story.

What do you wish your reporter/photojournalist partner would or would not do to lower the temperature out there?

Pitts: My checklist: Get the latest security intel from the government, local law enforcement, private security and any reliable source on the ground. Make sure I’m aware of local customs, weapon systems and the proper threat assessment. What’s the biggest threat: kidnapping, murder, violence, intimidation, robbery? I make sure I pack the proper clothes to fit in or not fit in. I make sure I’m in the best physical shape I can possibly be in. In many parts of the world size matters — if you look like someone not to be fooled with people will usually leave you alone. Have an exit strategy. I usually travel with a team, and here are the rules: Let someone in the home office know your schedule, then stay on schedule. We travel most often in daylight. We know in advance (as best we can) who must get paid on the trip — local drivers, interpreters, etc. Avoid negotiating prices on the ground and never flash money. We make all safety decisions as a group, and unanimous votes are the only ones that count. If anyone votes to stop, we stop — no questions asked.

Adkins: Door knocks are one of the most difficult things we do and most of us don’t want to be there. Recently I was with a reporter on a door knock, and when we got back to the car he turned to me and thanked me for being beside him on the stoop. He said, “You’re the only photog I work with that gets out of the car on these things.” I told him it’s a safety-in-numbers thing so I always go to the door with the reporter. Some reporters like to sit in the car while I may be out shooting B-roll. In some situations, I’ll ask them to get out of the car with me. Again, safety in numbers — and while my eye is glued to the viewfinder, their eyes can be open to our surroundings.

French: Read the situation and consider how the camera will change the dynamic. Cameras are a lot like alcohol, they intensify people’s personalities and intentions. If people are happy, they become happier around the camera; if they are angry, they become angrier at the camera and the person using it. Everyone is trying to hit a deadline, but remembering the people we are covering have to live with a situation long after our deadline has passed will hopefully help us be more respectful of the emotional temperature. Finally, keep an eye on each other and help if needed. Yes, we are competitors but at the end of the day our goal is the same.

Do newsrooms train journalists to handle this sort of thing? What would such training include?

Shapiro: No — and they should. Assessing threats and staying safe — whether that means being smart about physical threats, understanding basic cybersecurity, being able to deliver routine first aid, or basic awareness of psychological trauma — is part of the training news organizations should provide. This isn’t just something for correspondents covering exotic conflicts. Even local journalists may contend with mass shootings, disasters, civil unrest, or simply dangerous streets, disturbed individuals, traumatic assignments or the risk of mugging, sexual assault or being targeted because of our work. It’s an occupational health risk, just like repetitive strain injury. If a news company would invest in ergonomic chairs, why not invest in a safety briefing, first-aid course or trauma-awareness session?

Pitts: The first time I went to Afghanistan for CBS News, Dan Rather called me into his office. “Here are the rules of the road,” he said. “Don’t eat the meat, don’t drink the water and never look at the women.” He was smiling when he said it. And then he turned serious: “Who are the people you love most in the world? Think about it. Go back to your office and write each of them a letter. Seal the letters and leave them with me if you like. Because when you go someplace like Afghanistan, you might not come home.” Then he just sat there and let the idea sink in. Finally he added: “If you can accept that reality, then go with God. If not, we will send someone else.” Period. End of discussion. I share that story only to say this: In our business and in these times there are no guarantees. Read more

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