Articles about "War reporting"


Swedish journalists abducted in Syria may have lacked proper visas

The Local | Associated Press
Swedish journalists Magnus Falkehed and Niclas Hammarström "are experienced journalists and they know that they cannot move about in a regime-controlled area without a visa," Kassem Hamadé, a reporter for the Swedish newspaper Expressen, tells The Local. Falkehed and Hammarström were abducted Saturday as they tried to leave Syria. (more...)
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Journalist James Foley in 2011 (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)

James Foley has been missing for a year

GlobalPost | Committee to Protect Journalists | Associated Press | The Daily Northwestern | The Atlantic Friday marked one year since American freelance journalist James Foley went missing in Syria. "In order to preserve the security of our investigation, we’ve been unable to share much detailed information with the public or even with the GlobalPost family," writes Philip Balboni, GlobalPost's CEO and president. "But please know that our search for Jim has not slowed and that there are important leads being actively pursued even at this moment."
Foley in 2011 (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
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Occupy Oakland

Journalists under attack: Pros offer safety advice

Look at this page on the Committee to Protect Journalists’ website and feel a pain in your gut. The site documents the 45 journalists who have been killed on the job worldwide this year. Most were covering human rights, politics … Read more

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French and Malian troops search for journalists’ killers

Reuters | Radio France Internationale | Associated Press "Suspects have been questioned" in the killings of French journalists Ghislaine Dupont and Claude Verlon, France's foreign minister, Laurent Fabius, said Monday. Fabius wouldn't confirm a report that French troops had five people in custody, Reuters reports, but he told RTL that French and Malian troops were hunting for the journalists' killers. Dupont and Verlon worked for Radio France Internationale, which remembers both journalists: Dupont spent nearly three decades in the region and was once deported from Congo while reporting on elections there. "Even then she continued to report on the DRC from Paris and her stories shed light on the fractures between Paris and Kinshasa, resulting in RFI being banned from the airwaves in the country for over a year," RFI notes. (more...)
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CJ Chivers-0367

War correspondent C.J. Chivers reflects on post-9/11 world

C.J. Chivers is full of stories, and most of them aren’t pretty. The veteran war correspondent and former U.S. Marine, who goes by Chris, saw his career catapult into one successive overseas conflict after another just 12 days after 9/11.… Read more

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Only a few journalists will cover Syrian attack from Damascus

ABC News | Politico | The Huffington Post
ABC News announced Wednesday it has reopened its Beirut bureau. Correspondent Terry Moran will report from there if the U.S. attacks Syria. ABC News closed the bureau after the Lebanese Civil War ended, Dylan Byers reports.

Michael Calderone looks at which U.S. news outlets have reporters in Damascus. Wall Street Journal reporter Sam Dagher "appears to be the only U.S. newspaper reporter in Damascus," he writes, and CNN reporter Frederik Pleitgen "has the distinction of being the only TV correspondent from a U.S. network in the capital." The Associated Press "has also continued to operate out of Damascus," Calderone writes. Many news organizations use freelancers, in part because the Syrian government is stingy about granting visas. "The Washington Post hasn’t been able to secure one for more than a year," Calderone writes.

Even with a visa, Pleitgen acknowledged the restrictions on reporting in Damascus. While there isn't a government minder following the CNN crew, he said, the journalists only have permission to film in government-controlled parts of Damascus.

“Filming with the military can be frustrating, so we often have to independently make our way to the front line to get access to Assad's troops," Pleitgen said. "By and large, it is not too bad on the streets of Damascus as many people are willing to talk to us in the center of town. Things get more difficult on the outskirts close to rebel-held territory."
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James Foley

James Foley likely ‘being held with one or more Western journalists’ in Syria

GlobalPost | Boston.com | CJR
James Foley, a freelance journalist for Agence France-Presse and GlobalPost who's been missing in Syria since last November, was likely "abducted by a pro-regime militia group and subsequently turned over to Syrian government forces,” GlobalPost CEO and President Philip Balboni says.

Based on what we have learned, it is likely Jim is being held with one or more Western journalists, including most likely at least one other American.
The article notes that McClatchy and Washington Post freelancer Austin Tice has also been missing in Syria since last August. I asked McClatchy Washington Bureau Chief James Asher whether they had any information about Tice being the journalist referenced in Balboni's quote.

"Since August we continue to worry about his safety and hope for his eventual return to his family," he said via email. "Unfortunately there is little more we can say now." (more...)
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How an award-winning investigative reporter tracked killings in Iraq

Investigative Reporters and Editors’ list of 2012 award winners, released Wednesday, honors journalists who exposed shoddy care for the elderly and mentally ill, spotlighted inept and corrupt government officials, discovered a broken school truancy system, found … Read more

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McClatchy’s Syria Bureau Chief David Enders writes about being abducted:

I was recently abducted by a group of rebels in northern Syria. I was strip-searched and held, handcuffed and blindfolded, for six hours along with three Syrian men before we were let go. Our captors suspected me — an American journalist — of being a spy.

That is the price — and much worse — that any journalist working in Syria today must be prepared to pay. …

I had been preparing myself for years to be kidnapped, and though it was unpleasant, it went much better than I had expected.

David Enders, McClatchy

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Journalists who were present remember when Saddam Hussein’s statue came down in Baghdad’s Firdos Square on April 9, 2003:

The photographer Gary Knight saw more journalists and Marines than actual civilians. And those Iraqis he saw, he said, seemed to be “doing it for the benefit of the cameras” at what amounted to little more than a media event. Just beyond the view of he cameras, the square was mostly empty. Lt. Tim McLaughlin, the Marine tank commander whose American flag ended up briefly atop the statue before it fell, drily observed that it was hardly a turning point, just “an event that for me occurred probably between 4:10 in the afternoon and 4:25 in the afternoon.”

Ten years after the invasion, it is clear that the moment hardly heralded a clean and decisive victory. If anything, the news coverage raises questions about the role the news media played in the run-up to the war and the toll it took on soldiers and civilians.

Related: The Toppling: How the media inflated a minor moment in a long war (The New Yorker)

James Estrin, The New York Times

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