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Russian ‘law on bloggers’ takes effect today

mediawiremorningHello there. Sorry this isn’t Beaujon. Here are 10 or so media stories. Happy Friday!

  1. Russian blogger law goes into effect: It could crack down on free expression, Alec Luhn explains: “Popularly known as the ‘law on bloggers,’ the legislation requires users of any website whose posts are read by more than 3,000 people each day to publish under their real name and register with the authorities if requested.” (The Guardian) | “Registered bloggers have to disclose their true identity, avoid hate speech, ‘extremist calls’ and even obscene language.” (Gigaom) | The law also states that “social networks must maintain six months of data on its users.” (BBC News)
  2. More on David Frum non-faked photo fakery saga: Photo fakery surely occurs in places like Gaza, James Fallows writes. “But the claim that it has is as serious as they come in journalism.” The three words that are the “immensely powerful source of pride in what we do,” he says: “I saw that.” (The Atlantic) | Frum-related: 3 ways to prevent your apology from becoming the story, from Kristen Hare. (Poynter) | Gaza-related: Jay Rosen on why the AP revised its “members of Congress fall over each other to support Israel” tweet: “A major provider like the AP gets hit hard in the bias wars, so the principle, don’t give them ammunition! has to be built into its routines.” (Pressthink)
  3. SEC watchdog conducted lengthy leak investigation: “The SEC’s Office of Inspector General (OIG) started the investigation after Reuters published information about the regulator’s decision, taken in a closed-door meeting on Sept. 12, 2013, to settle its probe into JPMorgan Chase & Co’s massive London Whale trading loss.” Inspectors “don’t consider issues of press freedom when carrying out their investigations,” according to an OIG official. (Reuters)
  4. Media company Twitter interactions are up: The average number of Twitter interactions per month increased 159 percent between June 2013 and June 2014. John McDermott attributes that to October design tweaks that allow users to interact with retweet, reply and favorite buttons without first clicking or tapping the tweet. (Digiday)
  5. Chicago Tribune launches new website: The responsive platform — explained here by editor Gerould Kern — will be rolled out to other Tribune newspaper sites later this year, when metered paywalls will also be introduced. (Chicago Tribune) | Previously: Suggested tweets and choose-your-own adventure scrolling will be familiar to those who have visited the relaunched LA Times. (Poynter)
  6. More issues with Carol Vogel’s NYT stories? A tipster clues Erik Wemple in to three other troubling cases. But he notes “Not all eerie similarities are created equal.” (Washington Post) | A Times editor note earlier in the week acknowledges Vogel lifted part of a July 25 column from Wikipedia. (Poynter)
  7. Telegraph’s traffic up 20 percent in June: How? A “surge in Facebook traffic referral” as the Telegraph emphasized Facebook over Twitter. “It had previously been all about Twitter. Journalists are all on Twitter, and obsessed with it, so that is where the energy had gone,” Telegraph Media Group editor-in-chief Jason Seiken tells Mark Sweney. (The Guardian) | Related oldie-but-goodie: Ezra Klein tackles the “Why are journalists so obsessed with Twitter?” question. (Washington Post)
  8. Washington Business Journal won’t use the term ‘Redskins’: “I can’t dodge the question anymore,” editor-in-chief Douglas Fruehling writes in a paywalled article. (Washington Business Journal) | We’ll add them to our list of publications rejecting the football team name. (Poynter)
  9. It’s all about the clicks: “Has the Internet killed newspapers?” asks Jon Stewart. “YES!” The takeaway from this segment: Spend 15 minutes on a headline, five minutes on the article itself. (The Daily Show)
     

     

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Sara Just will be the executive producer of PBS NewsHour. Formerly, she was Washington deputy bureau chief for ABC News. (PBS NewsHour) | Josh Rubin will be executive producer and managing director for video at the Daily Dot. Formerly, he was a producer at CNN. Allen Weiner will be an editor at large at the Daily Dot. Formerly, he was a vice president of research for Gartner, Inc. (The Daily Dot) | Brandi Grissom will be enterprise editor for the Los Angeles Times. Formerly, she was managing editor of The Texas Tribune. (@brandigrissom) | Shelby Grad will be assistant managing editor for California news at the Los Angeles Times. Formerly, he was city editor there. Ashley Dunn will be deputy national editor for the Los Angeles Times. Formerly, he was metro editor there. Mark Porubcansky, foreign editor for the Los Angeles Times, will be retiring. Kim Murphy, who has been named assistant managing editor for national and foreign news, will add international coverage to her responsibilities. (Los Angeles Times) | Oskar Garcia, news editor for the Associated Press in charge of coverage of Hawaii, will be AP’s east region sports editor. (Associated Press) | LaToya Valmont will be managing editor of Glamour. Formerly, she was production director there. Job of the day: The Newhouse School at Syracuse University is looking for a director of its Goldring Arts Journalism program. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

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