Articles about "Washington Post"


ComScore: Users spend 60 percent of their digital media time with mobile platforms

— ComScore data indicates users spend 60 percent of their digital media time with mobile platforms, up from 50 percent last year. And “time spent on mobile apps is higher than any other digital medium, coming in at 51 percent,” CNET’s Dara Kerr writes.

— Version 2.0 of Jason Calacanis’ Inside app is here, Capital New York’s Johana Bhuiyan writes, with the realization that the real competition is Twitter, not other mobile news aggregators: “Out with the idea of a Pandora for news; in with readers ability to ‘follow’ topics they choose.”

— The Washington Post program to provide digital access to subscribers of other papers has an early success story, Michael Depp writes at NetNewsCheck: “The Minneapolis Star Tribune reports that 7,000 of its subscribers signed on for free access to the Post’s digital content after only five days and one promotional email.”

— Rumor has it the 4.7-inch iPhone 6 – and maybe a 5.5-inch version, too — will launch Sept.… Read more

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Pedestrians walk past the main entrance to the Washington Post , Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2007, in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Washington Post praises rival NYT for China story

The Washington Post

The Washington Post took the unusual step of praising its competitor, The New York Times, for the latter’s story on the wealthy relatives of one of China’s most prominent political figures.

The praise came in an piece by the Editorial Board posted Friday afternoon. The Times’ story, the editorial stated, “struck a welcome blow against an aggressive effort by Chinese authorities to censor such information not just from domestic media but also from the U.S. press.”… Read more

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Are pen names ever OK in journalism?

If your name is “Jason Huntmann,” then your name should be Jason Huntmann.

That’s the guiding principle I was operating under earlier this winter when I wrote about The Washington Post’s decision to pull down an op-ed piece after I questioned the author’s identity.

“Jason” had used the vaunted space of the Post’s opinion page to trash Washington, D.C., and its people, using a bad experience on our public transportation system as an illustration of everything that’s wrong with us.
The piece seemed far-fetched and over the top, and an odd choice for a self-described recent transplant to the city. Howdy, new neighbor! I hate you!

A statue of Molière, whose real name was Jean-Baptiste Poquelin. (AP Photo/Jacques Brinon)

The Post reached out to Jason to get another form of personal verification, but he never wrote back.… Read more

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Washington Post Executive Editor Marty Baron complained to the New York Times about not crediting his paper. Times Public Editor Sullivan e-mailed with the Times’ associate managing editor for standards, Philip B. Corbett, about the issue. He replied:

One complication is that there’s no clear or simple rule on when and how to credit. When information reported by another news organization is not widely known and we haven’t been able to match it ourselves, we normally attribute it or link to the source. But in cases where we have done our own reporting, it’s less clear-cut. We still want to credit another news organization if they have done major enterprise or have unearthed a big story — something no one would have known about without that initial reporting. But for an ongoing story or beat — where lots of reporters are chasing the same story line and may break different elements at different times — it’s not always practical or useful to tell readers, well, this element was first reported by News Organization A, and this other part was broken by Organization B, and we were the first to report these other pieces, etc.

Margaret Sullivan, The New York Times

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Viral strategy behind WaPo’s Know More blog won’t blow your mind; read this anyway

A two-month-old viral blog by The Washington Post (y’know, the venerable 136-year-old newspaper and venerable 17-year-old website) seems to have tapped into the shareable content trend of the moment.

And even if viral content’s a bubble bound to burst — thanks to Facebook interrupting its business model via algorithm changes or otherwise — the Post hardly has much to lose if Know More, a Wonkblog spinoff, doesn’t work out.

But if BuzzFeed and Upworthy manage to maintain full steam ahead, so too should Know More, which has adopted many of the two viral sites’ strategies, including engaging images, click-bait headlines (not necessarily pejorative), and a social media presence summed up in three words: Facebook, Facebook, Facebook.

“The most obvious similarity there is in targeting Facebook rather than Twitter,” said Dylan Matthews, the main reporter behind the blog, via phone.… Read more

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National Journal’s Ben Terris heads to WP’s Style

WashPost PR

Ben Terris, National Journal writer, announced on Twitter that he is joining The Washington Post’s Style section:

Washington Post Style Editor Frances Sellers and Eva Rodriquez, Style deputy features editor, said in a statement:

Ben comes to us from National Journal where in three years he rocketed from writing spot news to covering the conservative freshman class of 2010 and recently distinguished himself with a series of insightful political feature stories.

Terris has big shoes to fill; he succeeds Jason Horowitz, who joined The New York Times and whose stories at The Washington Post included the relevation of young Mitt Romney’s bullying of a student who he and his friends thought was gay.Read more

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The Post’s sale — 7 thoughts on a week that shook the newspaper industry

The week of all-Washington Post, all-the-time has just about wrapped, and I’m reminded of a Mo Udall aphorism about hot issues of the day in the nation’s capital: Everything has been said, but not everyone has said it yet.
Weighing in late in the cycle, let me try to highlight a few takeaways going forward for the Post itself and the industry.

1. The era of the public newspaper company is winding down. Before the Post spun off its newspaper holdings, Media General, Belo and Scripps had already.  As noted in my first comment on the sale, you cannot justify to shareholders pouring money into a long and uncertain digital transition for newspaper organizations when other businesses (cable, broadcast and for-profit education for the Washington Post Co.) offer better return now and in the next several years.… Read more

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Bezos has what The Washington Post needs: imagination and patience

The front page of today’s Washington Post print edition was dominated by coverage of the paper’s sale to Jeff Bezos. But a small story squeezed onto the bottom of the page, about the world’s first lab-grown hamburger, also gave some insight into what’s ahead for the legendary paper — and perhaps the rest of the news business.

The story recounted the taste test of the first lab-burger, which was described as “surprisingly crunchy.” The story noted who bankrolled the newfangled beef: Google’s Sergey Brin.

The Post — like the hamburger — will now be owned by a rich guy with a spirit of experimentation. Using just a tiny fraction of his tremendous wealth to buy the paper, Bezos made clear that he wants to tinker with the Post and explore the future of journalism.… Read more

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How Bezos, in his first memo to Washington Post staff, achieved believable optimism

Imagine this:

You’re a reporter at The Washington Post and you’ve just heard your company has been bought by, of all people, the guy who created Amazon.

Graham. Bradlee. Woodward. Bernstein.

Bezos?

Think you’re nervous?

Now imagine this:

You’re Jeff Bezos and you know that you’re about to own a building filled with thousands of employees as nervous as that reporter. And you also know that the first thing you say to them will be remembered as vividly as their first kiss, first car or, maybe, the first time they bought a CD on Amazon.

If you’re really good, you’ll say something that leaves them as optimistic about the future of their company as you are.

If you’re really good, you’ll say something they really believe.Read more

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Why the time is right for The Washington Post & others to boost video initiatives

The Washington Post will formally launch PostTV today — a big gamble that it can widen audience and win significant advertising revenue by producing digital video programs and distributing the segments to various partners.

Announced in concept in June, PostTV includes an existing news summary show called “The Fold.” “On Background” — an interactive news discussion hosted by Nia-Malika Henderson — will debut today at 12:30 p.m. ET, its regular time spot. Later in the week, “In Play,” a political show anchored by Chris Cillizza and former USA Today reporter Jackie Kucinich, will be added.

These three are just a start to a much bigger venture, senior editor for video Andrew Pergam told me in a phone interview. Additional shows will follow, and all will be chopped into segments that can be viewed individually and, over time, made available on other platforms.… Read more

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