Washington Post

Washington Post launches news app on all Android devices

The Washington Post announced Tuesday that its news app, which was launched late last year on Kindle Fire tablets, is now available on all Android devices.

The app comes with six months of free access to Washington Post journalism for readers who download it through Amazon’s Appstore.

The ongoing development of the app continues the Post’s adherence to a course charted by Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, who bought The Washington Post in 2013. According to Washington Post reporter Steven Mufson, Bezos’ vision for the business future of the newspaper included “a new ‘daily ritual bundle’ that would combine a wide variety of material.”

The expanded offering is the latest creation of Project Rainbow, The Washington Post’s in-house innovation lab for news and tech. In recent months, staffers there have been tinkering with The Post’s digital offerings, serving up two different versions of the outlet’s site to readers in an effort to foster serendipity. Read more

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Jason Rezaian trial may resume on weekend

The on-again, off-again — but mostly off-again — “espionage” trial of the Washington Post’s Jason Rezaian may not resume until the weekend.

There have been just two court sessions of a proceeding closed to outsiders, including his family.

Doug Jehl, the newspaper’s foreign editor, said Monday that “with Ramadan about to begin, we don’t expect the trial to resume until this weekend at the earliest.”

On Saturday Iranian President Hassan Rouhani indicated to media that he’s following the case. He didn’t elaborate on the substance of the matter.

There hasn’t been much to follow. There apparently have been just two sessions since the trial started shortly after Memorial Day weekend in the U.S. Read more

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Here’s the muckraking reporter who exposed FIFA

The Washington Post

If you haven’t already, take lunch and read this profile of Andrew Jennings, a dogged investigative journalist whose reporting helped expose FIFA’s dirty dealings. Here’s a taste:

The best way for Americans to imagine Andrew Jennings is to roll Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein together, then add a touch of a Scottish burr and plenty of flannel. Jennings was born in Scotland but moved to London as a child. His grandfather played for a prominent London soccer team, Clapton Orient (now called Leyton Orient), but Jennings had little interest in the sport. He did, however, have a nose for journalism.

After finishing school, Jennings joined the Sunday Times in London, where he got a taste of investigative journalism. He went to work for the BBC, but when the network wouldn’t air his documentary on corruption within Scotland Yard, he quit and joined a rival program called “World in Action.” He turned his police investigation into his first book, “Scotland Yard’s Cocaine Connection,” and a documentary.

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Baseball cap nearby, Jason Rezaian’s brother pleads for his release

Ali Rezaian, brother of journalist Jason Rezaian, speaks by a picture of his brother, who is being held in Iran, and their mother, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 2, 2015, during a House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Ali Rezaian, brother of journalist Jason Rezaian, speaks by a picture of his brother, who is being held in Iran, and their mother, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 2, 2015, during a House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

The brother of Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian sat before a congressional committee Tuesday with an Oakland A’s cap inches away and implored Iran to free Jason.

“It is time for Jason to come home,” see his family and watch his favorite team, Ali Rezaian told the House Foreign Affairs Committee.

The cap was a small but vivid symbol of family yearning, frustration and even outright fear over the arrest and trial on seemingly bogus espionage charges of Jason Rezaian, whose closed trial is currently suspended due to religious holidays in Iran. Read more

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Washington Post refutes reporter’s ties to White House

The Washington Post | Mehr News

Washington Post editor Martin Baron on Thursday pushed back against nebulous accusations from Iranian authorities that Tehran bureau chief Jason Rezaian passed information to the White House in some official capacity.

The statement from Baron contested evidence from Iranian officials cited in an espionage trial against Rezaian that ostensibly established his connection to the administration of President Barack Obama.

The State-affiliated Mehr News agency in Iran reported on Wednesday that Rezaian was confronted during the trial with a letter he sent to Obama touting his connections to influentials within the country.

Not true, says Baron. In fact, the message cited was an application for a job in the Obama administration filed three years before he began working for The Post. Read more

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Maryland prosecutor condemns leaks to the press

Think Progress

In an announcement Friday morning that the state attorney’s office had cause to file homicide charges against police officers in Freddie Gray’s death, Maryland state attorney Marilyn Mosby condemned leaks to the press. Think Progress, a site by the left-leaning Center for American Progress Action Fund, reported:

“While I am committed to transparency, what I have revealed here today is now a matter of public record. However, the evidence that we have collected and continue to collect cannot ethically be released to the public,” Mosby said. ‘I strongly condemn anyone in law enforcement with access to trial evidence who has leaked information prior to the resolution of this case. You are only damaging our ability to conduct a fair and impartial process for all parties involved.

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The New York Times, ‘PBS Newshour’ strike video-sharing agreement

The New York Times and “PBS NewsHour” have entered into an agreement to share video journalism, including news reports and longer documentaries, on a regular basis, the outlets announced Thursday.

The deal specifies that both news organizations will begin to offer each other footage for use on their websites and social channels.

This announcement formalizes an arrangement that manifested recently when “PBS NewsHour” aired a New York Times video about the film giant Kodak attempting to reinvent itself, according to the announcement. The program also broadcast two other videos from The New York Times, including an in-depth look at the life of Times Tehran Bureau Chief Thomas Erdbrink.

The agreement does not include a provision for sharing revenue, according to a spokesperson for The New York Times. Read more

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Career Beat: Kevin Krolicki named Washington bureau chief at Reuters

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Kevin Krolicki has been named Washington bureau chief at Reuters. Previously, he was Japan bureau chief there. (Poynter)
  • Michael Oreskes is now senior vice president of news and editorial director at NPR. Previously, he was vice president and senior managing editor of The Associated Press. (Poynter)
  • Amy Gardner is now senior local politics editor at The Washington Post. Previously, she covered the White House there. (Washington Post)
  • Dakarai Turner is now a reporter and multimedia journalist at WMAR in Baltimore. Previously, he was a reporter at WLTX. (TV Spy)
  • Julie Shapiro is now news editor on the global continuous publishing desk at Time. Previously, she was news editor at DNAinfo.
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15 political clichés journalists should avoid

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The New York Times | The Associated Press | The Washington Post

Politico’s Mike Allen, founder of the influential Beltway tipsheet “Playbook,” once wrote that those who write in clichés are probably thinking in clichés, too. As news organizations prepare to cover the 2016 election, here are some hackneyed words and phrases they should consider leaving off the campaign bus:

New York Times standards editor Philip Corbett weighed in Tuesday with a list of well-worn words that sneak into The Times’ coverage:
“I can project with confidence that we will see far too many uses of “optics,” “narrative,” “pivot,” “war chest” and “coffers” in the months between now and November 2016.”

A 2012 election style guide from The Associated Press offers a litany of stale verbiage. Read more

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Bill O’Reilly to NYT reporter: ‘I am coming after you with everything I have’

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Bill O’Reilly threatens jounalist

    In an interview with The New York Times Monday, Fox News host Bill O'Reilly warned reporter Emily Steel there could be consequences for inappropriate coverage surrounding disputed claims about his reportage of the Falklands War. “I am coming after you with everything I have,” Mr. O’Reilly said. “You can take it as a threat.” (The New York Times) | Politico's Dylan Byers followed up with Steel, who told him "the story speaks for itself." (Politico) | Here's Steel's tweet. (@emilysteel) | O'Reilly continued defending his coverage Monday and sought to end the controversy. (CNN Money) | Meanwhile, the author of a New York Times story that O'Reilly cited in his defense said the anchor "cut out an important phrase" while reading it on air.

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