40 Better Hours: Improve your workweek

40 Better Hours: Improve your workweek

40 Better Hours: Improve your workweek

September 19-23, 2016 | Watch the videos | #40BetterHours

40 Better Hours is a project from Katie Hawkins-Gaar and Ren LaForme dedicated to improving your work life in small but meaningful ways. By fixing things like workflow and communication, providing ways to manage stress and monitor mental health, addressing ways to effectively lead through transitions, and sharing skills to combat information overload, we can create happier workplaces that are better equipped to innovate and respond to industry changes.

From September 19-23, 2016, we hosted a special week of free training here on Poynter.org. Each day included a video, helpful takeaways and opportunities to interact with presenters.

You can watch all of the videos in this YouTube playlist. And you can sign up for the 40 Better Hours pop-up newsletter, where we’ll keep you posted on future training.

If you’re interested in related Poynter training, we’ve rounded up some webinars of interest. Bonus: Use the promo code ‘40BetterHours‘ to get 50 percent off!

40 Better Hours is Poynter’s first crowdfunded project. It was made possible by the generous support of Ruth Ann Harnisch and dozens of other supporters. Thank you all for helping to make work better!

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