Al Tompkins

Profile

Courses

1
Poynter Producer Project (Spring 2019)
Expires After: Does not Expire

Enrolled?

Fill out this quick survey in preparation for your weekend at The Poynter Institute!

Teaching dates

March 26 to April 30, 2019
In-Person at Poynter April 12, 13, 14

Live video sessions

Tuesdays, March 26 and April 2, 23, 30 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. Eastern time.

If you’re unable to attend a live session, there will be a recording available.

Nearly every broadcast company has a need to hire newscast producers. It may be the single most difficult position to fill because we demand so much of producers. The Poynter Producer Project helps newsrooms grow their own producers. We have decades of success stories — many of our graduates are now news directors, executive producers and network executives.

This seminar is practical, affordable and we offer parts of it in live online sessions to make it fit the demanding newsroom schedules.

Tuition and scholarships

The cost is $499, which includes tuition for the four-week online group seminar and in-person training at Poynter. Travel to and from St. Petersburg and your hotel is on your own, but we have arranged for discounted hotel accommodations.

Thanks to generous support from CNN, members of NABJ, NAHJ, AAJA and NAJA may apply for 50% tuition scholarship. If you are a member of one of these associations, please email advorak@poynter.org to receive your scholarship code.

Program details

Making stories work involves more than just teases and live shots. This unique seminar will help you expand your expertise as a TV producer with new writing, storytelling, coaching and ethical decision-making skills.

We’re combining the best of online learning with in-person coaching and mentoring to help you tell stronger stories and make those tough calls on deadline.

“The Poynter Producer Project reignited the passion for what I do and made me a better producer in every way. I learned to be a better newsroom leader, which led to a promotion to Executive Producer.”
— Jim Bob Breazeale, KEYE, Austin, TX

“The Producer Project gave me perspective on managing workflow and egos — both of which are vital with political coverage.”
— Brian Calfano, KOLR TV

“The Poynter Producer Project helped me level up in my career, expand my skill set, and shape me as a leader in the newsroom. The course was a meaningful experience and excellent networking opportunity.”
— Sara Shyiak, CTV

In the online portion of this seminar, Poynter’s Al Tompkins will guide you through weekly readings, activities and live group discussions. You’ll also come to Poynter on April 12-14 for a weekend of in-person coaching and feedback.

Throughout this course, you’ll gain practical and creative ideas to share with your colleagues and a new energy to bring to your work.

During each week of the online portion of the course, you’ll join live discussions, and Al will have office hours to discuss your work one-on-one. Can’t attend the live sessions? We’ll make replays available of all the live events.

Most importantly, you will get 360-degree feedback from your newsroom to understand what you are doing well and where you could get stronger. This is the kind of feedback producers tell us they want most.

What will I learn?

  • How to find stories that others miss
  • How to find a focus for your story
  • A framework for making ethical decisions on deadline
  • How to write clear, clean copy
  • Techniques for managing peers, managers and subordinates

Who should take this course

Producers at any stage in their career, including associate and newscast producers as well as executive producers.

Instructors

Al Tompkins

Al Tompkins

Al Tompkins is The Poynter Institute’s senior faculty for broadcasting and online. He has taught thousands of journalists, journalism students and educators in newsrooms around the world. His teaching focused on writing, reporting, storytelling, ethics, critical thinking, photojournalism, social media and online journalism.

Tompkins has taught television news producers, reporters, photojournalists and managers in his workshops in 49 states, Canada, Egypt, Ecuador, Denmark, Cayman, Iceland and South Africa. He has taught and coached print newsrooms in the U.S. and abroad how to build interactive news websites, how to use video more effectively online and how to manage ethical issues that arise online.

ramon.escobar

Ramon Escobar

Ramon Escobar is the Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion for CNN Worldwide. In addition to his role with the Diversity Council, Escobar oversees the recruitment and development of on-air talent as Vice President of Talent Recruitment and Development. He will be based in New York.

A media veteran with 25 years of experience in news and entertainment in local, cable and network television as well as digital/new media, Escobar has the unique perspective of having worked in both English and Spanish-language media. Has developed expertise in both the U.S. Hispanic market and Latin America having traveled extensively throughout Latin America working with international media companies around the globe. Escobar came to CNN from Telemundo where he was the head of the news division. Prior to his time at Telemundo, Escobar was Vice President of Consulting at Sucherman Group where he worked closely with a cross-section of news and entertainment networks on programming, news and digital media strategy.

Kirsten Wolff

Kirsten Wolff is the news director for WESH 2 in Orlando, Florida. She has held this position since 2014. Previously, she was the station’s assistant news director. Before arriving in Orlando, Wolff worked as an executive producer at KCRA 3, the NBC and Hearst Television affiliate in Sacramento, California. A native Californian, Wolff graduated from UC Berkeley with a degree in French language. Her path into broadcast journalism was an unorthodox one. Armed only with a foreign language degree, she was able to land a job as a videographer, transitioned into producing and then into management. She started her career in Bakersfield, California, moved to Monterey, Sacramento and finally to Orlando. Wolff was named Broadcast and Cable’s 2016 News Director of the Year for guiding her team through the Pulse Massacre. She is the winner of Five Emmy Awards. Her proudest achievement is assembling a team of professional journalists who work together to cover the news and weather events that impact the Central Florida communities that they serve.

Michael T. Rodriguez

Michael T. Rodriguez is the president and general manager of WTSP in Tampa, Florida. Michael Rodriguez has spent nearly 20 years in the media industry. In 2012, he was named vice president and general manager of Univision’s flagship stations in South Florida. Under his leadership, Univision-23 remained the highest-rated station in Miami and Ft. Lauderdale, regardless of language. Prior to joining Univision, Rodriguez spent 10 years with NBC/Telemundo. In August 2002, he was named vice president and general manager of Telemundo 51 in Miami. As general manager, the station became the number one rated 11pm news in South Florida, regardless of language. He is the only general manager in South Florida TV history to lead two number one rated stations on two different networks.

Schedule

This schedule is tentative and is subject to change. We’ll be adding instructors as well. Stay tuned!

We break the course into five parts. Here’s what we’ll cover:

Part 1 (Online, March 26, 1:00 p.m.): Finding focus, story shapes and optimizing your storytelling. This is vital to producers who also have to write leads and teases.

Part 2 (Online, April 2, 1:00 p.m.): Story motivators and visual storytelling: Producers must understand how to powerfully leverage the sometimes limited visuals they have available. They also shape the storytelling by coaching the reporters/MMJs/photojournalists to attach the stories to one of eight key motivators that will make the story more interesting to a wider audience. You will learn these motivators and how to use them to shape not just the stories but also teases and promotions.

Part 3 (At Poynter, April 12, 13, 14): When the producers come to Poynter for three days, they are in for an action-packed learning experience. In our three days we will focus on:

  • What every producer needs to know about tease writing
  • The power of active writing
  • Making ethical decisions on deadline
  • 360-degree feedback from their newsroom colleagues and bosses
  • What great producers do to stand out from the pack
  • The skills of online and social media writing

Part 4 (Online, April 23, 1:00 p.m.): Feedback on your teases. This is a two-hour session online where every producer will submit samples of their work and the group will give live feedback.

Part 5 (Online, April 30, 1:00 p.m.): Developing a career path, exploring ratings and uncovering new income opportunities. For many producers it is the first real look inside the business of their business.

About online group seminars

In an online group seminar, you will gather with other participants in a virtual space, logging in from anywhere, day or night, over the course of several weeks. A faculty member guides the group through new material, moderates discussions and provides individual feedback.

Questions?

We’d love to hear from you. Email us at info@newsu.org.

Thank you to our sponsor

4
The Flying Camera: Drone Photography Skills Webinar Series
Expires After: 5 Month(s) 15 Day(s)

You know how to fly a drone. Now it’s time to leverage drone technology to capture more compelling images and videos. This series of webinars will help you hone your aerial photography skills, from mastering multi-axis moves and intelligent flight designs to perfecting your mechanics to getting the right insurance.

The teaching will be specific, practical and applicable to journalism and beyond. Filmmakers, real estate photographers, public relations and public information photographers will also benefit.

Each webinar in the four-part series will include a demonstration of the techniques and skills that produced an image or clip and built-in interaction with the two co-leaders:

  • Al Tompkins, senior faculty for broadcast and online at the Poynter Institute. He is an FAA licensed drone pilot and led Poynter’s Drone Journalism School in 2017, producing the code of drone journalism ethics.
  • Judd Slivka, director of the University of Missouri’s aerial journalism program.

They will be joined remotely by two other experts ready to weigh in on your specific questions about drone photography and the law:

  • Eric Seals, photo and video journalist at the Detroit Free Press and NPPA board member.
  • Mickey Osterreicher, NPPA legal counsel. He is experienced in contract, media, copyright and First Amendment Law.

Poynter is proud to partner with National Press Photographers Association for this webinar series.

What I will learn:

  • How to create dynamic shots with the three surface controls
  • How to use the gimbal to create dynamic and useful images
  • Incorporating altitude, speed, yaw and roll
  • How to maximize the potential of your drone using intelligent flight modes
  • Framing, exposure, movement and composition
  • Editing and integrating drone shots into your work
  • The drone gear you “need” versus the gear you “want”

Schedule:

Mastering the moves

  • Single-axis photography: The bread and butter shot for breaking news and limited opportunities
  • Dual-axis photography: Reveals photographic surprises and add dimension
  • Orbit photography: add context and dimension to the subject
  • Rotations: Improve pitch, yaw and roll moves
  • ATTI mode: Gain flight and photography control

Mastering the mechanics

  • Making a plan to capture great images and video
  • Lighting and exposure adjustments for aerial photographers
  • What to do when you have to fly toward the sun
  • The importance of capturing “RAW” images
  • How to effectively use ISO and shutter speeds in flight photography
  • How shadows add depth to aerial images
  • The power of a vertical image
  • Using the gimbal to add dramatic movement to a single-axis shot

Mastering style

  • Building aerial sequences for editing
  • The value of leading lines in drone photography
  • How high should you fly and why?
  • The drone as a low-flying steadycam
  • The power of still photography using drones
  • Drone photography composition
  • Following your subject at an angle
  • Using drones to create a “big reveal” shot hidden by a foreground

Mastering the final touches

Why constant recalibration is vital

Mastering Intelligent Flight modes

  • Trace
  • Profile
  • Spotlight
  • Point of Interest
  • Courselock
  • Tripod mode

Bracketing photos post-production to perfect your images

Hyperlapse and timelapse techniques

The tools you want versus the tools you need

  • Neutral density filters
  • Landing pads
  • Screen shade
  • Carrying cases/backpacks
  • Batteries and power stations
  • Which memory card should you use?
  • Hazard lights/nightlights
  • Insurance

7
Teachapalooza: Front-Edge Teaching Tools for College Educators
Expires After: Does not Expire

Teachapalooza is the place to catch up, power up and reignite your passion for teaching. Join us June 7-9, 2019 at the Poynter campus in St. Petersburg, Fla., for three fast-paced days of relevant, cut-to-the-chase learning for journalism educators.

Teachapalooza will get you up-to-date on the technology and trends that shape journalism, show you the latest ways educators are using innovation in their classrooms and focus on data storytelling and new storytelling platforms. Even more, you’ll join a lasting community of journalism educators who share your passion for shaping the next generation of journalists.

Teachapalooza 2019 will once again be taught by Poynter senior faculty Al Tompkins and feature 100 percent fresh content. Because of the close community, dynamic leadership and immediate relevance, around 68 percent of 2018 Teachapalooza attendees had been to a previous Teachapalooza. Return again in 2019 — or come for the first time!

Instructors

Al Tompkins
Senior Faculty, Broadcast and Online
The Poynter Institute

Kathleen Bartzen Culver
Assistant Professor; James E. Burgess Chair in Journalism Ethics
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Robert Hernandez
Associate Professor of Professional Practice
USC Annenberg

Karen Houppert
Associate Director, Sr. Lecturer
Johns Hopkins University
Krieger School of Arts & Sciences

Frank LoMonte
Director
Brechner Center for the Freedom of Information

Joy Mayer
Audience Engagement Strategist
Adjunct Faculty, Poynter and the University of Florida

Les Rose
Professor of Practice, Broadcast & Digital Journalism
Syracuse University
S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

Eric Seals
Photo & Video Journalist
Detroit Free Press

Stephen Stock
Investigative Reporter
NBC Bay Area

Janice Tibbetts
Instructor II
Carleton (CA) University School of Journalism and Communication

Rev. Sidney Tompkins
Licensed Psychotherapist
Retired UMC Minister

Keith Woods
Vice President, Newsroom Training and Diversity NPR

Debora Halpern Wenger
Assistant Dean for Innovation and Partnerships, Associate Professor
The University of Mississippi, The Meek School of Journalism and New Media

You will learn how to:

  • Advise student media and champion students’ First Amendment rights
  • Better teach investigative journalism and help your students detect hidden stories
  • Teach video and multimedia storytelling that looks cinematic but stays true to the facts
  • Empower students to manage their stress, actually talk to sources and confront workplace discrimination

We will also inspire your teaching with our Show and Share sessions taught by YOU, the participants who share the coolest new ideas you are trying out in your classrooms.

Schedule

Updated Jan. 2019. Subject to change.

9:00 a.m. — How to have a successful TEACHA (Al Tompkins)

9:15 a.m. — How to be a hackademic no matter how big your school/budget (Robert Hernandez)

10:30 a.m.Break and breathe

10:45 a.m. — Teach Students to EARN Trust (Joy Mayer)

12:00 p.m. — Lunch

12:30 p.m. — Show and share: My best assignments, Part 1

1:45 p.m. — Deep dive breakout sessions

  • Get your students working with the pros (Karen Houppert)
  • How to land grant funding (Robert Hernandez)
  • Legal myths that journalism students and teachers fall for (Frank Lemonte)

2:45 p.m.Break and breathe

3:00 p.m. — “You see numbers, I see a story” (Stephen Stock)

4:15 p.m.Break and breathe

4:30 p.m. — Student publications: a legal battleground (Frank Lemonte)

9:00 a.m. — Power shift: Preparing students to confront and prevent workplace harassment and discrimination (Katy Culver)

10:30 a.m.Break and breathe

10:45 a.m. — “I don’t want to wind up on YouTube!” Finding the courage and skill to teach tough subjects (Keith Woods)

12:00 p.m. — Lunch

12:30 p.m. — Show and share: My best assignments, Part 2

1:30 p.m.Break and breathe

1:45 p.m. — Deep dive breakout sessions

  • The places you can send students to find data for stories and assignments (Stephen Stock)

2:45 p.m.Break and breathe

3:00 p.m. — “Do you see what I see?” How to teach students to think visually (Eric Seals)

4:15 p.m.Break and breathe

4:30 p.m. — Six awesomely cool things you can do with your phone to teach and amaze your students (Al Tompkins)

9:00 a.m. — How to teach students to talk to people, not just text or IM them for stories (Les Rose)

10:15 a.m.Break and breathe

10:30 a.m. — What my new study shows about the future of video (Deb Wenger)

11:30 a.m. — From classroom to publication: Getting your students’ work published (Janice Tibbetts)

12:00 p.m. — Lunch

1:00 p.m. — How to teach your students (and yourself) to manage stress and trauma (Al Tompkins, Rev. Sidney Tompkins)

2:00 p.m. — Graduate and goodbyes

8
TV Assignment Editor Workshop
Expires After: Does not Expire

Teaching dates

July 5 to July 26, 2019

Live video sessions

Tuesdays, July 9, 16, 23, 30 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. Eastern time.

If you’re unable to attend a live session, there will be a recording available.

For the third year, Poynter is offering training exclusively for TV assignment editors. And to make it easy to attend, we are offering the training in LIVE one-hour online segments.

We will show you how to find stories and sources online, how to use great new tools to get stories online and on social media faster and how to help others to “get” your vision for the stories you are pitching. Assignment editors also have to help newsrooms drill down to find the truth in stories. We will strengthen your critical thinking skills to help inoculate you from the noise and nonsense that is constantly coming at you.

In this seminar, Poynter’s Al Tompkins will guide you through weekly readings, activities and live group discussions.

Throughout this course, you’ll gain practical and creative ideas to share with your colleagues and a new energy to bring to your work.

What will I learn

  • How to find stories that others miss
  • How to find a focus for your story
  • How to use new Web tools to enhance your storytelling
  • How to think critically about stories

Who should take this course

TV assignment editors

Instructor

Al Tompkins

Al Tompkins is The Poynter Institute’s senior faculty for broadcasting and online. He has taught thousands of journalists, journalism students and educators in newsrooms around the world. His teaching focused on writing, reporting, storytelling, ethics, critical thinking, photojournalism, social media and online journalism.

Tompkins has taught television news producers, reporters, photojournalists and managers in his workshops in 49 states, Canada, Egypt, Ecuador, Denmark, Cayman, Iceland and South Africa. He has taught and coached print newsrooms in the U.S. and abroad how to build interactive news websites, how to use video more effectively online and how to manage ethical issues that arise online.

Al is an FAA licensed drone pilot and has organized and lead drone journalism workshops around America that produced more than 325 graduates. He co-authored the drone ethics guide.

Tompkins is the author of the book “Aim For The Heart: Write, Shoot, Report, Produce for TV and Online,” which is being used by more than 125 universities as their main broadcast writing, reporting and ethics textbook.

About online group seminars

In an online group seminar, you will gather with other participants in a virtual space, logging in from anywhere, day or night, over the course of several weeks. A faculty member guides the group through new material, moderates discussions and provides individual feedback.

Time estimate

The content of this course unfolds over several weeks. There are few scheduled live meeting times. Except for several live discussions, you’ll be able to learn on a schedule that works for you. The minimum time commitment each week is three to four hours.

Questions?

We’d love to hear from you. Email us at info@newsu.org.

9
TV Power Reporting Academy
Expires After: Does not Expire

Teaching dates

Sept. 6 – Oct. 18

In-Person at Poynter Sept. 27, 28, 29

Live video sessions

Tuesdays, Sept. 10, 17 and Oct. 1, 8 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. Eastern time.

If you’re unable to attend a live session, there will be a recording available.

Enrolled?

Fill out this quick survey in preparation for your weekend at The Poynter Institute!

Some of the biggest names in local and network television journalism are graduates from our TV Power Reporting Academy. Our alumni include John Larson, Boyd Huppert, Byron Pitts, Katie Couric, Stuart Watson, Byron Harris and Roberta Baskin. Now, it’s your turn to gain the skills, strategy and confidence to elevate your career in broadcast.

We keep things practical, usable and affordable.

Power Reporting is one of Poynter’s signature seminars, and our 2019 academy will once again be led by senior faculty for broadcast and online, Al Tompkins. For more than 25 years, TV reporters, photojournalists, visual journalists and multimedia journalists have relied on Poynter to build their reporting, writing and ethical decision-making skills.

During this hybrid online and in-person training, you will get individual feedback on your work, hone your critical thinking and learn to find the stories that others miss. When you’re done, you’ll have a toolkit full of practical skills and a roadmap to move your career ahead. Here’s what one attendee said:

“I think that my attending this workshop will help my newsroom as a whole. For one thing, it gives me a bit more gravitas. Everyone was eager to hear what I’d learned, and when I suggested to my boss a different way of handling a story (by trying to find people affected by the issue instead of just getting a quote from an official), he agreed, even though it will take longer. So, WIN!”

For 17 years, The Poynter Institute’s Al Tompkins has led this seminar that is a bedrock for Poynter teaching. You will get feedback on your work, will sharpen your writing and storytelling skills, learn how to enterprise stories and look beyond the obvious, tired ways of covering daily news. Of course, Poynter focuses on ethical decision-making skills and adding diverse voices to stories.

What will I learn

  • How to write clearer, stronger stories—finding your focus, building to big surprises and more
  • What every reporter needs to know about lighting, motion, sequences, action/reaction and cameras
  • How to be a story idea machine and how you can never be without a pitch
  • How to get beyond announcements, fake claims and spins
  • The Tough Calls Toolbox: Practical ethics when you are tight on time
  • How to include new voices and see new parts of your community that are seldom covered
  • How you can grow in your newsroom and organization and create a roadmap to move your career ahead

Who should take this course

TV reporters and VJ/MMJ/backpack journalists for television, as well as college educators and international journalists. This seminar also is perfect for photojournalists who want to learn to write and report.

Application process

The process to apply is straightforward and simple. No letter of recommendation or reference is required. Please be prepared to answer questions about your professional experience, areas of interests and basic demographic information.

Instructor

Al Tompkins

Al Tompkins is The Poynter Institute’s senior faculty for broadcasting and online. He has taught thousands of journalists, journalism students and educators in newsrooms around the world. His teaching focused on writing, reporting, storytelling, ethics, critical thinking, photojournalism, social media and online journalism.

Tompkins has taught television news producers, reporters, photojournalists and managers in his workshops in 49 states, Canada, Egypt, Ecuador, Denmark, Cayman, Iceland and South Africa. He has taught and coached print newsrooms in the U.S. and abroad how to build interactive news websites, how to use video more effectively online and how to manage ethical issues that arise online.

Al is an FAA licensed drone pilot and has organized and lead drone journalism workshops around America that produced more than 325 graduates. He co-authored the drone ethics guide.

Tompkins is the author of the book “Aim For The Heart: Write, Shoot, Report, Produce for TV and Online,” which is being used by more than 125 universities as their main broadcast writing, reporting and ethics textbook.

Schedule

Below is a tentative schedule for the 2019 program. Sessions and instructors are subject to change.

Week One: (Sept. 10, live class at noon ET)

  • Finding the lead and focus of your story
  • Story shapes; What goes first, and why
  • Building to the big surprises
  • How breaking news writing is different

Week Two: (Sept. 17, live class at noon ET)

  • The eight BIG motivators to make every story more interesting
  • Building memorable characters
  • How to write in active voice every time (and why it matters to your journalism)
  • How to avoid clichés and muddy modifiers
  • Capturing sound bites that sing
  • The importance of natural sound

Week Three at Poynter, St. Petersburg, Florida: (Sept. 27-29, 2019)

  • What every MMJ/VJ reporter needs to know about photojournalism, lighting, motion, sequences, action/reaction and your camera
  • How to be a Story Idea Machine (never be without a pitch)
  • How to “Think Critically” and get beyond announcements, fake claims and spins
  • The Tough Calls Toolbox: practical ethics when you are tight on time
  • How to use FOIA laws and public databases to find stories others miss
  • How to be a mobile and social media superstar and drive viewers to your stories
  • How to talk with kids, crime victims and other vulnerable people
  • 30 Minutes of Fame: In-person focused feedback on your work including on-camera performance as well as journalism and storytelling content
  • Amazingly cool online tools and apps (learn to capture 360-degree interactive photos, build edited videos on your phone, produce animated gifs on your phone and more. Every tool is free and takes less than two minutes to use.)
  • How to be a social media superstar
  • How to effectively move your TV reporting to online

Week Four: (Oct. 1, live class at noon ET)

  • In this TWO-hour session, we will focus on Stand-ups and Teases. You will submit examples of stand-ups and teases and the seminar group will offer feedback on your work.

Week Five: (Oct. 8, live class at noon ET)

  • Your road ahead: you will interview your bosses to get insight on how you can grow in your newsroom and organization.
  • You will draft a plan of action to move your career ahead. We will be right there with you.

About online group seminars

In an online group seminar, you will gather with other participants in a virtual space, logging in from anywhere, day or night, over the course of several weeks. A faculty member guides the group through new material, moderates discussions and provides individual feedback.

Questions?

We’d love to hear from you. Email us at info@newsu.org.

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6

1,400 aftershocks later, Anchorage newsrooms are shaken but reporting

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7

Nexstar to buy Tribune Broadcasting for $6.4 billion

Nexstar Media Group has reached an agreement to acquire Tribune Media Co. for about $6.4 billion. The deal, which is even larger than was initially reported over the weekend, would make Nexstar the biggest owner of local TV stations in the country. ...

8

A Little Rock TV station denied Nazis news coverage

News director Austin Kellerman of KARK-TV/Fox16 News wrote to viewers to explain why they would not be covering a Nazi rally on the Capitol steps recently. He explained, "Quite frankly, I’m not willing to give them our attention. There are far too many important issues in our communities that need to be covered. This doesn’t deserve our time. You, as a viewer of KARK and Fox16, deserve better."...

9

Sinclair backs away from Boris

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10

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11

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The Department of Justice claimed Wednesday that "the President and his staff have absolute discretion over which journalists they grant interviews to, as well as over which journalists they acknowledge at press events. That broad discretion necessarily includes discretion over which journalists receive on-demand access to the White House grounds and special access during White House travel for the purpose of asking questions of the President or his staff. No journalist has a First Amendment right to enter the White House." Dozens of media companies filed legal briefs Wednesday saying if CNN loses its lawsuits all journalists may be at risk if they cross the president....

12

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13

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14

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15

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16

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17

60 Minutes Executive Producer Jeff Fager will ‘stay on vacation’ during sexual misconduct investigation

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18

Scripps Howard Foundation announces $6 million to university investigative journalism programs

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19

CBS keeps Moonves pending investigation

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Federal court refuses to overturn FCC rule, but not because it’s a good one

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