Career

Poynter Results

  • Career

    Article

    Just 22, this digital news publisher is ready to go old-school with print

    Chas Hundley’s family first settled in the unincorporated town of Gales Creek, Oregon, (pop. less than 600) in 1883. A fifth-generation resident of Gales Creek, the 22-year-old grew up in the foothills of the Coast Range, where he still lives today.

    When Hundley was a teenager, Gales Creek hit some hard times. It lost its post office and its tavern and its elementary school all within the span of about a year. So Hundley did what anyone would do who wanted to save his town: he started a news website.

  • Leadership

    Article

    Women dominate journalism schools, but newsrooms are still a different story

    Margaret Sullivan remembered standing in front of a class of Northwestern University journalism students. She noticed the difference there from the newsroom meetings she had led in previous years.

    Her class of 20 had just three or four men. But in her decades-long career as a journalist and editor, she had become accustomed to news meetings with a dozen men and, at best, one other woman.

  • Career

    Article

    This viral news editor quit her job to become a freelance illustrator

    “I started to think about what it would be like to not live in survival mode and what it meant like to really live...I’m gonna take this huge risk and see what happens.”

    Throughout her career, Hannah Bae built her own safety nets to take risks throughout her career: first by moving to Seoul straight from college, to navigating press relations in Korean government, and most recently, by quitting a cushy job at CNN Money to pursue freelance writing and illustration. Poynter spoke to Bae about the decision to write a new chapter of her professional and personal life.

  • Career

    Article

    This Chicago TV anchor quit his job to become a Lyft driver and podcaster

    “Why would this news anchor from a major market quit his job to drive Lyft? It just doesn’t make sense.”

    Anthony Ponce realizes how it looks to fellow journalists. Ten years into his career as an anchor for NBC Chicago and four months after his son was born, he decided to quit his successful anchor and reporter job at NBC Chicago and embark on his own journey.

 
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