Safety

Poynter Results

  • Safety

    Article

    When the newsroom has to evacuate

    To stay or not to stay is the unavoidable question for Florida businesses, with a complicating reality for media: They have to continue to operate to do what they do and cover Hurricane Irma.

    What to do?

    The Tampa Bay Times and Miami Herald were studies in contrast due to differing evaluations of the sturdiness of their primary headquarters.

  • Safety

    Article

    Kerry Sanders, master of TV disaster, recounts a storm-tossed career

    After a career spent leaning into BB-gun raindrops and tree-snapping winds, Kerry Sanders is getting ready for another harrowing close-up.

    Sanders, a correspondent for NBC News, has covered more than 60 hurricanes in his decades-long career, which has taken him to New Orleans during Katrina, the front lines of Desert Storm and the 2003 invasion of Iraq. Now, as Category 4 Hurricane Irma prepares to wallop South Florida, Sanders is bracing to cover the storm after just having witnessed the devastation wreaked by Hurricane Harvey in Texas.

  • Safety

    Article

    To journalists covering wars and disasters: 'Thank you for your service'

    Last weekend in Valdosta, Georgia I found myself in the rest room of a Cracker Barrel restaurant. Next to me at the sink was a Georgia State Trooper, uniformed, armed, and armored, a massive man with a short blond military haircut. We got to chatting. “Thank you for your service,” I said, resorting to the greeting made popular for first responders after 9/11.

  • Safety

    Article

    ‘Bring pencils’ and 49 other things hurricane pros know

    Editor's note: Martin Merzer spent 29 years at the Miami Herald. He held a variety of roles there, including senior writer in charge of hurricane coverage. Over the years, he sent this note out to the staff in advance of hurricanes, including the devastating barrage of storms that wracked Florida in 2004 and 2005. It is republished here with his permission.

  • Safety

    Article

    Hurricane Harvey couldn't silence Texas radio stations

    When Hurricane Harvey's intensity became clear, employees at 93Q in Houston reserved hotel rooms across the street from the station. They were going to be very busy.

    The on-air talent slept in the Cox-owned radio station for days, said Bill Tatar, digital content manager at Cox Media Group Houston. When they weren't on-air, they did Facebook Live hits.

  • Safety

    Article

    After being flooded out of their station, KHOU employees are stocking up on supplies

    With her staff working round-the-clock to cover catastrophic news and engineers busy fixing up the studio, the last thing Susan McEldoon wants to worry about is food.That's why McEldoon, the president and general manager of Houston TV station KHOU, has stocked a giant pantry at the station's temporary digs (their permanent studio flooded on Sunday). The small act of stacking case after case of food for workers to grab as they pound away on keyboards or load up for another shift in the field has raised morale.

  • Safety

    Article

    As the water rose, this Houston TV station fought to stay on-air

    Hurricane Harvey may have forced the journalists at KHOU-TV to evacuate. But they didn't stop covering the storm.

    The Houston-based CBS affiliate was covering the floods when water began to seep into the studio. The station, which is across the street from the Buffalo Bayou river, took on water up to the anchor desk while Len Cannon was on the air.

    KHOU social media reporter Doug Delony posted video of Cannon on the air talking about the flood while water was rising around his shoes.

  • Safety

    Article

    A Utah newspaper carrier saw a house fire, woke up the owner, then got back to work

    When Matthew Hoagland saw bright light inside a home on his newspaper delivery route early Tuesday morning, he called 911, then banged on the door and woke the homeowner up.

    "I was pounding on the door really hard, and that's apparently what got her up because she came out a moment later," he told The Salt Lake Tribune's Bob Mims.

    Mims reports that the homeowner was unharmed, and shortly after firefighters showed up, Hoagland left to finish his route.

 
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