Storytelling

Storytelling

Poynter Results

  • Storytelling

    Article

    6 ways analytics help you understand your social media audience

    Different audiences live on various social media platforms, and their expectations for what you share (and how) can be wildly different. The good news is that you can use the free analytics tools offered by Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to unlock the details about your audience and share relevant content.

    Analytics can tell you:

    • Audience breakdown by gender 
    • The age of your audience
    • Where your audience is located
    • What else your audience is interest in
    • When your audience visits the site

    Using this data, you can:

  • Storytelling

    Article

    Advice for journalists in Las Vegas from journalists in Orlando

    The number of dead in Las Vegas is staggering, John Cutter thought on Monday.

    The managing editor of the Orlando Sentinel has felt this way before, when 49 were killed a little more than a year ago at Pulse Nightclub. 

    "You always figure 'we'll be the last,'" he said.

    But when he woke to the news of the latest mass shooting, "I don't even know how to describe how horrible the feeling was."

  • Storytelling

    Article

    7 ideas for writing blog posts

    Even the best writers struggle from time to time in generating story ideas. This can be especially tricky for bloggers, who want to produce a steady flow of content for their audience. Here are some different types of posts you can produce:

    The Point-Counterpoint

  • Storytelling

    Article

    How to trim wordiness in your writing

    Writers often use more words than they need. While wordiness or redundancy is not “wrong” in a grammatical sense, too many unnecessary words could slow readers down and distract them. Even worse, readers could get frustrated by your writing and move on to something else. 

    Wordiness lurks in several places. You can find redundancy in adjectives and phrases that repeat information a noun already conveys. For example:

  • Storytelling

    Article

    From Shakespeare to Irma: the storm as story

    It was odd to think about Shakespeare during a hurricane, but the Bard knew his storms. From "King Lear" to "The Tempest," where there was a Will, there was a wave, and often a deluge.

    Shakespeare liked his storms because they placed his characters under pressure, scattered them to the corners of the Earth, made them strangers in strange lands, and tested what they were made of.

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