Tips/Training

Poynter Results

  • Tips/Training

    Article

    From competition to avoidance: 5 styles of conflict resolution

    Experts in conflict resolution say people tend to have a “default style” -- a preferred approach that typically we rely on. Here are five styles, drawn from the work of conflict scholars Kenneth Thomas and Ralph Kilmann. Which one are you apt use, especially in difficult conversations?

  • Tips/Training

    Article

    10 questions for your headline-writing checklist

    Headlines are lifelines to our readers. They grab attention, build trust and help time-pressed consumers focus on the stories they care most about. How do you ensure that they are engaging as well as accurate? Here are 10 questions to ask when you are writing (or editing) headlines.

  • In-person teaching

    Poynter-NABJ Leadership Academy for Diversity in Digital Media (December 2017)

    The interactive, week-long academy will focus on critical leadership skills journalists of color face on the path to leadership in digital journalism and technology. Sessions will explore developing effective management styles; understanding journalism business models; navigating newsroom and digital culture; building collaborative teams; managing across differences; audience engagement; emerging technologies; and coaching critical thinking.

  • Tips/Training

    Article

    7 graduation speeches that will renew your faith in journalism

    As a recent college graduate, I can attest that it’s been a busy — albeit exciting — couple of months. And some journalists and media executives have been getting in on the action.

    Several prominent national journalists, editors and media executives, including Marty Baron of The Washington Post and Nikole Hannah-Jones of The New York Times Magazine, have addressed the newest batch of college graduates over the past few weeks. While the speeches vary in tone and subject, they all share a reverence for facts and responsible storytelling.

  • Tips/Training

    Article

    Use these 4 lists to organize your investigative reporting project

    Investigative reporting requires that you create a plan. Typically, it's a series of four lists of things you need to do, along with an initial schedule. The lists will change — and often grow — and the schedule may change, but you need to start with a plan to keep yourself organized.

    List 1: Research

  • Tips/Training

    Article

    Here's what you should consider before using a fact-check rating system

    One of the hallmarks of fact-checking is to demonstrate whether a claim has been corroborated by facts. Many fact-checking organizations use a rating system when they offer a verdict for a claim they have researched, according to a survey by the Duke Reporters' Lab.

    Here are some pros and cons to implementing a rating system, such as the Pinocchio scale used by The Washington Post’s Fact Checker.

    Advantages

  • Tips/Training

    Article

    9 tips for writing stronger headlines

    Headlines are lifelines to our readers. They grab attention, build trust and help time-pressed consumers focus on the stories they care most about. Here are nine ways to write engaging, accurate headlines for any platform.

  • Tips/Training

    Article

    9 ways to end your stories

    There are endless ways to end stories, but few hard and fast rules. Yet every writer knows that the story must reach a satisfying conclusion.

    Here are a handful of strategies on which you can rely.

  • Tips/Training

    Article

    2 types of leads that get right to the news

    Whether you're reporting news or telling a story, you know you have to entice your audience instantly. There are essentially two types of leads for any story: direct and delayed. One gets to the point immediately, while the other may take awhile. But each type responds to the central interest: "Tell me the news" or "Tell me a story."

 
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