Fact-Checking Research Database

We collect (and briefly explain) major studies on fact-checking, fake news and misinformation

Recent Research

Research Study

Fact-Checking Effectiveness as a Function of Format and Tone: Evaluating FactCheck.org and FlackCheck.org

Dannagal G. Young, Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Shannon Poulsen, and Abigail Goldring
Our Summary

Video or text? Evaluating the relative efficacy of different formats for fact-checking.

In this comparison of an article and a video fact-checking the same claim, the video seems to be more effective at improving factual understanding among its audience.

Our Summary

Social media comments are just as effective at correcting health misinformation as algorithms

This study measures the extent to which algorithms and comments on Facebook that link to fact checks can effectively correct users' misconceptions about health news. Researchers tested this by exposing 613 survey participants to simulated news feeds with three condition.

Research Study

Perceived social presence reduces fact-checking

Youjung Juna, Rachel Menga, Gita Venkataramani Johar
Our Summary

People are less likely to fact-check when they're around other people

This study of eight experiments aims to measure how social presence affects the way that people verify information online. It found that, when people think they're being judged by a large group of people online, they're less likely to fact-check claims than when they're alone.

Research Study

Processing political misinformation: comprehending the Trump phenomenon

Briony Swire, Adam J. Berinsky, Stephan Lewandowsky, Ullrich K. H. Ecker
Our Summary

Fact-checking corrects misperceptions but doesn't affect votes

This study looks at the effect of partisanship on the likelihood of accepting a factual correction. In two separate studies, four true and four false claims by Donald Trump were presented to a sample of Democrats, non-Trump supporting Republicans and Trump-supporting Republicans.

Research Study

The Elusive Backfire Effect: Mass Attitudes' Steadfast Factual Adherence

Thomas Wood, Ethan Porter
Our Summary

The "backfire effect" fails the replication test

The "backfire effect" is a cognitive bias detected in a 2010 study ("When corrections fail: The persistence of political misperceptions") suggesting that sometimes factual corrections increase — rather than decrease — misperceptions among a target group.

 
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