Fact-Checking Research Database

We collect (and briefly explain) major studies on fact-checking, fake news and misinformation

Recent Research

Our Summary

Fake news and fact-checking websites both reach about a quarter of the population — but not the same quarter

Fake news has a relatively large audience, but it went deep with only a small portion of Americans. Fact-checkers also draw large audiences, but it doesn’t seem to bring the corrections to those who most need to read them.

Our Summary

Labeling some fake stories on social media increases the believability of untagged fake stories

Attaching warnings to stories on social media platforms like Facebook that have been debunked by fact-checkers modestly decreases their perceived accuracy while increasing the perceived validity of untagged fake stories.

Our Summary

Social media comments are just as effective at correcting health misinformation as algorithms

This study measures the extent to which algorithms and comments on Facebook that link to fact checks can effectively correct users' misconceptions about health news. Researchers tested this by exposing 613 survey participants to simulated news feeds with three condition.

Our Summary

Related links on Facebook could help correct misinformation

This study experiments with a feature that lists related stories underneath existing posts on Facebook in order to determine whether social media helps reinforce or correct users' misperceptions.

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