Fact-Checking Research Database

We collect (and briefly explain) major studies on fact-checking, fake news and misinformation

Recent Research

Research Study

Social Media, Political Polarization, and Political Disinformation: A Review of the Scientific Literature

Joshua A. Tucker, Andrew Guess, Pablo Barber, Cristian Vaccari, Alexandra Siegel, Sergey Sanovich, Denis Stukal, Brendan Nyhan
Our Summary

A comprehensive look at misinformation research

This high-level review looks at all the major scientific literature on the relationship between social media, political polarization and disinformation.

Research Study

Anatomy of an online misinformation network

Chengcheng Shao, Y Pik-Mai Hui, Y Lei Wang, Xinwen Jiang, Alessandro Flammini, Filippo Menczer, Giovanni Luca Ciampaglia
Our Summary

On Twitter, misinformation outscaled fact-checking leading up to 2016 U.S. election

In this study, researchers analyze tweets from the run-up and aftermath of the 2016 U.S. presidential election to determine how the spread of misinformation relates to that of fact-checking.

Keywords:

Our Summary

Fake news and fact-checking websites both reach about a quarter of the population — but not the same quarter

Fake news has a relatively large audience, but it went deep with only a small portion of Americans. Fact-checkers also draw large audiences, but it doesn’t seem to bring the corrections to those who most need to read them.

Research Study

Characterizing Political Fake News in Twitter by its Meta-Data

Julio Amador, Díaz López, Axel Oehmichen, Miguel Molina-Solana
Our Summary

Tweeters that post fake news have more followers — and use more links — than those who don’t

In this study, researchers seek to understand the difference between tweets containing fake news and those that don’t by analyzing their metadata. Specifically, they use a sample of more than 1.5 million viral tweets collected on the 2016 U.S.

Research Study

Debunking: A Meta-Analysis of the Psychological Efficacy of Messages Countering Misinformation

Man-pui Sally Chan, Christopher R. Jones, Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Dolores Albarracín
Our Summary

The most effective way to fact-check is to create counter-messages

It’s often not enough for fact-checkers to simply correct online misinformation — they also have to create detailed counter-messages and alternative narratives if they want to change their audiences’ minds.

Our Summary

Social media comments are just as effective at correcting health misinformation as algorithms

This study measures the extent to which algorithms and comments on Facebook that link to fact checks can effectively correct users' misconceptions about health news. Researchers tested this by exposing 613 survey participants to simulated news feeds with three condition.

Research Study

Perceived social presence reduces fact-checking

Youjung Juna, Rachel Menga, Gita Venkataramani Johar
Our Summary

People are less likely to fact-check when they're around other people

This study of eight experiments aims to measure how social presence affects the way that people verify information online. It found that, when people think they're being judged by a large group of people online, they're less likely to fact-check claims than when they're alone.

 
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