Fact-Checking Research Database

We collect (and briefly explain) major studies on fact-checking, fake news and misinformation

Recent Research

Research Study

Antecedents of bullshitting

John V.Petrocelli
Our Summary

Bullshitting is socially constructed

In this study, the author aims to figure out what makes people take up bullshitting, or "communications that result from little to no concern for truth, evidence and/or established semantic, logical, systemic, or empirical knowledge." To do that, he ran two separate experiments: One in which he t

Research Study

Facing up to the facts: What causes economic perceptions?

Catherine E. De Vries, Sara B. Hobolt, James Tilley
Our Summary

Giving corrective economic information works, but it doesn't change views

Most people’s economic perceptions were rooted in real economic changes, like job growth and unemployment, and — most importantly — people who held inaccurate views of the economy generally changed them when presented with corrective information.

Research Study

Fact-Checking Effectiveness as a Function of Format and Tone: Evaluating FactCheck.org and FlackCheck.org

Dannagal G. Young, Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Shannon Poulsen, and Abigail Goldring
Our Summary

Video or text? Evaluating the relative efficacy of different formats for fact-checking.

In this comparison of an article and a video fact-checking the same claim, the video seems to be more effective at improving factual understanding among its audience.

Our Summary

Social media comments are just as effective at correcting health misinformation as algorithms

This study measures the extent to which algorithms and comments on Facebook that link to fact checks can effectively correct users' misconceptions about health news. Researchers tested this by exposing 613 survey participants to simulated news feeds with three condition.

 
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