Fact-Checking Research Database

We collect (and briefly explain) major studies on fact-checking, fake news and misinformation

Recent Research

Research Study

Anatomy of an online misinformation network

Chengcheng Shao, Y Pik-Mai Hui, Y Lei Wang, Xinwen Jiang, Alessandro Flammini, Filippo Menczer, Giovanni Luca Ciampaglia
Our Summary

On Twitter, misinformation outscaled fact-checking leading up to 2016 U.S. election

In this study, researchers analyze tweets from the run-up and aftermath of the 2016 U.S. presidential election to determine how the spread of misinformation relates to that of fact-checking.

Keywords:

Research Study

Characterizing Political Fake News in Twitter by its Meta-Data

Julio Amador, Díaz López, Axel Oehmichen, Miguel Molina-Solana
Our Summary

Tweeters that post fake news have more followers — and use more links — than those who don’t

In this study, researchers seek to understand the difference between tweets containing fake news and those that don’t by analyzing their metadata. Specifically, they use a sample of more than 1.5 million viral tweets collected on the 2016 U.S.

Research Study

Debunking: A Meta-Analysis of the Psychological Efficacy of Messages Countering Misinformation

Man-pui Sally Chan, Christopher R. Jones, Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Dolores Albarracín
Our Summary

The most effective way to fact-check is to create counter-messages

It’s often not enough for fact-checkers to simply correct online misinformation — they also have to create detailed counter-messages and alternative narratives if they want to change their audiences’ minds.

Research Study

Fake News and Misinformation: The Roles of the Nation’s Digital Newsstands, Facebook, Google, Twitter and Reddit

Jacob Finkel, Steven Jiang, Mufan Luo, Rebecca Mears, Danaë Metaxa-Kakavouli, Camille Peeples, Brendan Sasso, Arjun Shenoy, Vincent Sheu, Nicolás Torres-Echeverry
Our Summary

How four of the biggest tech platforms spread fake news during the 2016 U.S. election

In this comprehensive law practicum, student researchers at Stanford University surveyed the ways in which Facebook, Google, Twitter and Reddit helped facilitate the spread of fake news during the 2016 U.S election.

 
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