Fact-Checking Research Database

We collect (and briefly explain) major studies on fact-checking, fake news and misinformation

Recent Research

Research Study

Anatomy of an online misinformation network

Chengcheng Shao, Y Pik-Mai Hui, Y Lei Wang, Xinwen Jiang, Alessandro Flammini, Filippo Menczer, Giovanni Luca Ciampaglia
Our Summary

On Twitter, misinformation outscaled fact-checking leading up to 2016 U.S. election

In this study, researchers analyze tweets from the run-up and aftermath of the 2016 U.S. presidential election to determine how the spread of misinformation relates to that of fact-checking.

Keywords:

Our Summary

Fake news and fact-checking websites both reach about a quarter of the population — but not the same quarter

Fake news has a relatively large audience, but it went deep with only a small portion of Americans. Fact-checkers also draw large audiences, but it doesn’t seem to bring the corrections to those who most need to read them.

Research Study

Debunking: A Meta-Analysis of the Psychological Efficacy of Messages Countering Misinformation

Man-pui Sally Chan, Christopher R. Jones, Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Dolores Albarracín
Our Summary

The most effective way to fact-check is to create counter-messages

It’s often not enough for fact-checkers to simply correct online misinformation — they also have to create detailed counter-messages and alternative narratives if they want to change their audiences’ minds.

Research Study

Fact-Checking Effectiveness as a Function of Format and Tone: Evaluating FactCheck.org and FlackCheck.org

Dannagal G. Young, Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Shannon Poulsen, and Abigail Goldring
Our Summary

Video or text? Evaluating the relative efficacy of different formats for fact-checking.

In this comparison of an article and a video fact-checking the same claim, the video seems to be more effective at improving factual understanding among its audience.

 
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