Fact-Checking Research Database

We collect (and briefly explain) major studies on fact-checking, fake news and misinformation

Recent Research

Our Summary

Fake news and fact-checking websites both reach about a quarter of the population — but not the same quarter

Fake news has a relatively large audience, but it went deep with only a small portion of Americans. Fact-checkers also draw large audiences, but it doesn’t seem to bring the corrections to those who most need to read them.

Research Study

Debunking: A Meta-Analysis of the Psychological Efficacy of Messages Countering Misinformation

Man-pui Sally Chan, Christopher R. Jones, Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Dolores Albarracín
Our Summary

The most effective way to fact-check is to create counter-messages

It’s often not enough for fact-checkers to simply correct online misinformation — they also have to create detailed counter-messages and alternative narratives if they want to change their audiences’ minds.

Research Study

Fact-Checking Effectiveness as a Function of Format and Tone: Evaluating FactCheck.org and FlackCheck.org

Dannagal G. Young, Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Shannon Poulsen, and Abigail Goldring
Our Summary

Video or text? Evaluating the relative efficacy of different formats for fact-checking.

In this comparison of an article and a video fact-checking the same claim, the video seems to be more effective at improving factual understanding among its audience.

Our Summary

The more partisan your online news diet, the less likely you are to believe fact-checkers

This study was conducted ahead of the 2012 presidential election. Respondents were asked whether they were aware of experts' conclusions on four political misconceptions, whether they believed them and which online news outlets they consumed.

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