Cue the outcry — more big Twitter changes on the way

Friday. Good morning (or good evening, if you're reading this at night). Andrew Beaujon is back next week.

  1. Let's freak out about Twitter changes: Sayeth Twitter: "in many cases, the best Tweets come from people you already know, or know of. But there are times when you might miss out on Tweets we think you’d enjoy." Noooooooo! (Twitter) | Stuart Dredge weighs in: "The difference between the two social networks is that Facebook is taking stories out of its news feed – it prioritises around 300 a day out of a possible 1,500 for the average user – while Twitter is only adding tweets in. For now, at least." (The Guardian) | Previously: I wrote about the Facebookification of Twitter and the Twitterfication of Facebook. (Poynter)
  2. More Twitter changes: Now with audio! "Notably, Twitter is teaming up with Apple to let users listen to certain tracks and buy the music directly from the iTunes store," Yoree Koh reports. Twitter is also partnering with Soundcloud. (Wall Street Journal) | "Throughout your listening experience, you can dock the Audio Card and keep listening as you continue to browse inside the Twitter app," product manager Richard Slatter writes in a blog post. (Twitter)
  3. The media kinda sucks at covering Ebola: Just look at how it covered #ClipboardMan, Arielle Duhaime-Ross writes. (The Verge)
  4. Liberian media really sucks at covering Ebola: The Daily Observer newspaper "has become a feeding ground of phony conspiracy," Terrence McCoy reports. "The top three news stories on the website all allege medical professionals purposely infected the country with Ebola, ideas that have drawn the conspiratorial from across the planet." The bad journalism is leading to a debate over press freedom in the country. (Washington Post) | From yesterday: The BBC is using WhatsApp to spread accurate information about the virus in Africa. (Journalism.co.uk)
  5. Correction of the week: Deadspin retracted its story claiming U.S. Rep. Cory Gardner didn't actually play high school football, as he claimed, after the primary source changed his mind. "As serial collectors of media fuck-ups, we add this self-portrait to the gallery," editor Tommy Craggs writes. (Deadspin) | Earlier, Craggs told Erik Wemple, "If you’re looking for someone to blame here, blame me for getting way too cocky about my site’s ability to prove a negative." (Washington Post)
  6. Whisper vs. The Guardian: A damning report in The Guardian on Thursday claimed Whisper, "the social media app that promises users anonymity and claims to be 'the safest place on the internet', is tracking the location of its users, including some who have specifically asked not to be followed." (The Guardian) | Whisper editor-in-chief Neetzan Zimmerman angrily denied the report, and wrote on Twitter that the piece "is lousy with falsehoods, and we will be debunking them all." (Washington Post) | Here's a good explainer from Carmel DeAmicis: "The two sides disagree over what constitutes 'personally identifiable information,' whether rough location data tied to a user’s previous activity could expose someone." (Gigaom) | And here's a take from Mathew Ingram, who says Whisper's problem is that it "wants to be both an anonymous app and a news entity at the same time." (Gigaom)
  7. American journalists detained in Russia: Joe Bergantino, co-founder of the New England Center for Investigative Reporting, and Randy Covington, a professor at the University of South Carolina, are in Russia to teach an investigative journalism workshop. They were found guilty of "violating the visa regime" and will return to the U.S. on Saturday as scheduled. "Russian authorities have used visa issues in the past as a pretext to bar the entry for certain individuals to the country," Nataliya Vasilyeva reports. (AP via ABC News)
  8. Good times at High Times: Subscriptions and advertising pages are growing for "the magazine about all things marijuana" as it celebrates its 40th birthday. Dan Skye, High Times' editorial director, tells Michael Sebastian, "I think the legalization has everything to do with the boom." (Ad Age)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: The Daily News (see it at the Newseum).NY_DN
  10. No job moves today: Benjamin Mullin has the day off. But be sure to visit Poynter's jobs site. Happy weekend!

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would you like this roundup sent to you each morning? Please email abeaujon@poynter.org.

  • Sam Kirkland

    Sam Kirkland is Poynter's digital media fellow, focusing on mobile and social media trends. Previously, he worked at the Chicago Sun-Times as a digital editor, where he helped launch digital magazines and ebooks in addition to other web duties.

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