Dorian Nakamoto looks to sue Newsweek over Bitcoin story

mediawiremorningHey, hi. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Lawsuit over Newsweek's Bitcoin story? The man who Newsweek's Leah McGrath Goodman identified as the founder of Bitcoin is raising money on a website to sue the magazine, claiming he was "targeted and victimized by a reckless news organization." Dorian Nakamoto has been unemployed for 10 years, the site says. "Donations, obviously, can be made by bitcoin." (TechCrunch) | Previously: In March, Nakamoto told the AP he hadn't heard of Bitcoin until his son told him about it after talking to Newsweek: "I got nothing to do with it." (Poynter)
  2. Snyderman sorry for violating Ebola quarantine: The 21-day quarantine for NBC News crew members who traveled to Liberia is now mandatory after Dr. Nancy Snyderman violated the voluntary quarantine. “As a health professional I know that we have no symptoms and pose no risk to the public, but I am deeply sorry for the concerns this episode caused." (THR) | The freelance cameraman who contracted Ebola and is recovering, Ashoka Mukpo, tweeted his "endless gratitude for the good vibes." (NBC News) | Ebola-related: The New York Post fronts the Dallas nurse who contracted Ebola — and her dog. (New York Post) | Bentley "is being held in isolation and watched closely, but it is unlikely that he will have to be euthanized, Dallas city officials said." (Mashable)
     

     

  3. Christie and Clinton overkill? Since Jan. 1, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was been the most-mentioned potential Republican presidential contender, according to a LexisNexis search of 15 top newspapers, with Mitt Romney, Ted Cruz and Rand Paul not far behind. Hillary Clinton, of course, is the most-referenced Democrat — and it's not close at all. "Overall, more stories have talked about potential GOP candidates (202) than Democratic ones (115)." (Pew Research Center)
  4. Kushner no longer OC Register's publisher: New publisher and CEO Richard Mirman takes over for the beleaguered Aaron Kushner, who remains CEO of Freedom Communications, which owns the newspaper. Mirman is an investor in the Register. (Orange County Register) | Previously: The Los Angeles Register closed last month after just five months of operation (Poynter), and the Register reportedly owes the Los Angeles Times $3.5 million in distribution fees. (OC Weekly)
  5. Rift between Guardian and NYT? When The Guardian's hard drives were being smashed by British authorities in 2013, the newspaper arranged for The New York Times to share and protect some of its Snowden documents. But now, Lloyd Grove reports, some Times editors are frustrated with The Guardian's "total control over the Snowden cache, including how and when it can be used to develop, pursue and publish investigations." Counters Times executive editor Dean Baquet: "I don’t feel held captive by The Guardian, because I wouldn’t have access to these particular documents without The Guardian.” (The Daily Beast)
  6. White House's Secret Service spin: "White House reporters are often too swamped to fully check out every assertion made by the White House’s press operation, and in this case officials seized on a phrase that is in the report. The report is rather complicated and someone reading quickly might not catch the nuance that this was not actually a finding, but merely a claim made by, among others, by the very person whose credibility is questioned throughout the report." (Washington Post)
  7. BBC looks at "hybrid" broadcast-Internet radio on phones: "Nearly two thirds of the mobile phone owners surveyed found the idea of hybrid radio appealing and said it could be a deciding factor when faced with a choice between phones with similar specs." (BBC)
  8. Not front page of the day: A story on A1 of some editions of The New York Times today is missing a byline and lede.
     

     

  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: Times-Journal of Fort Payne, Alabama, with a very not-lifesize picture of Ebola (Courtesy the Newseum).
     
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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Betsy Woodruff will be a politics writer for Slate. She's currently a politics writer at the Washington Examiner. ‏(@woodruffbets) | Carlos Lozada will be a nonfiction book critic at The Washington Post. Previously, he edited Outlook there. (Washington Post) | Josef Federman is now Jerusalem bureau chief for The Associated Press. Previously, he was a news editor at the AP. (AP) | Chris Carter is now digital services sales director for The Alliance for Audited Media. Previously, he was director of business development for DG Interactive. (AAM) | Job of the day: The Associated Press is looking for a photo editor. Get your résumés in! (AP) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would you like this roundup sent to you each morning? Please email abeaujon@poynter.org.

  • Sam Kirkland

    Sam Kirkland is Poynter's digital media fellow, focusing on mobile and social media trends. Previously, he worked at the Chicago Sun-Times as a digital editor, where he helped launch digital magazines and ebooks in addition to other web duties.

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