ESPN 'frees' Bill Simmons, but will he seek more freedom elsewhere?

mediawiremorningIt's Wednesday. That means you get 10 media stories.

  1. Freed Simmons: ESPN's Bill Simmons returns to the network today after his three-week suspension "for calling N.F.L. Commissioner Roger Goodell a 'liar' during a podcast, and then effectively daring ESPN to punish him." His contract expires next fall, Jonathan Mahler and Richard Sandomir report. Will he leave? (New York Times) | Deadspin would take him. (Deadspin) | Previously: At the time of the suspension, Kelly McBride wrote, "when your biggest star declares himself above his newsroom’s standards, the boss has to respond." (Poynter)
  2. Oops — ABC News didn't beat NBC after all: Two weeks ago, Nielsen reported that ABC's "World News Tonight" topped "NBC Nightly News" for the first time in 260 weeks. But it turns out NBC actually kept its streak alive thanks to revised ratings after Nielsen discovered inaccuracies, Bill Carter reports. (New York Times)
  3. How Time is getting all that traffic: "Time, together with sister site Money, published at least five different pieces" on the day the cable channel FXX began its marathon of "The Simpsons." Joseph Lichterman takes a deep look at how Time is engaging its audience — and how it has more than doubled its unique visitors in a year. (Nieman Lab) | Previously: Time.com’s bounce rate down 15 percentage points since adopting continuous scroll (Poynter)
  4. AP's Gannon speaks: “Honestly, I’ve thought it through so many times — I know neither Anja or I would have done anything differently,” says AP correspondent Kathy Gannon in her first interview since she and photographer Anja Niedringhaus were attacked in Afghanistan in April. Niedringhaus was killed, and Gannon "was hit with six bullets that ripped through her left arm, right hand and left shoulder, shattering her shoulder blade." (Poynter)
  5. Layoffs at CNN, Conde Nast: CNN has closed its entertainment news division, and shows including Christiane Amanpour's have lost their production staffs, Alex Weprin reports. (Capital New York) Meanwhile, "Condé Nast is expected to lay off 70 to 80 employees within the next week or two, primarily from the group that oversees ad sales," writes Jeffrey A. Trachtenberg. (Wall Street Journal)
  6. Baltimore Sun redesign: A Los Angeles-times style redesign comes to another Tribune newspaper. Among the advantages, writes executive editor Trif Alatzas: "Endless-scroll technology connects you to other news categories and related articles and images without page breaks at the end of an article or Web page." (Baltimore Sun) | Previously: New L.A. Times site: precooked tweets and a new flavor of infinite scroll (Poynter) | How news sites are adding continuous scrolls to article pages (Poynter)
  7. Vox's email newsletter debuts today: One differentiator: It'll be sent in the evening, not the morning. And it'll consist of, uh, "sentences." (Nieman Lab)
  8. ICYMI: The South Florida Sun Sentinel is reducing its emphasis on print, and that means changing things beyond workflow: “It’s our language, how we talk,” associate editor Anne Vasquez told Kristen Hare. For instance, “‘That was a great paper today’ or ‘Write that story for 1A.’” (Poynter)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: The final edition of the San Francisco Bay Guardian, "one of the most venerable, staunchly independent, and defiantly weird of America’s great alternative weekly newspapers," as Slate's Will Oremus describes it.
     
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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Justin Bank is deputy editor of audience development at The New York Times. Previously, he ran The Washington Post's audience and digital news team. (The New York Times) | Dao Nguyen is now BuzzFeed's publisher. Previously, she was vice president of growth and data there. (Poynter) | Michael Dimock has been named president of the Pew Research Center. Previously, he was executive vice president there. (Politico) | Tessa Gould is senior director of native advertising at The Huffington Post. Previously, she was director of HuffPost's partner studio. (Huffington Post) | Kevin Gentzel has been named head of advertising sales for Yahoo. Previously, he was chief revenue officer for The Washington Post. (Poynter) | Peter Cooper will be the writer and editor for the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum. He's a music columnist for The Tennessean. (The Tennessean) | Sean Kelley will be managing editor of Cooking Light. Previously, he was director of content and video for Sharecare. Katie Barreira will be director of Cooking Light Kitchen. Previously, she was food editor of Every Day with Rachael Ray. (Fishbowl NY) | Job of the day: GoLocalPDX is looking for an investigative reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would you like this roundup sent to you each morning? Please email abeaujon@poynter.org.

  • Sam Kirkland

    Sam Kirkland is Poynter's digital media fellow, focusing on mobile and social media trends. Previously, he worked at the Chicago Sun-Times as a digital editor, where he helped launch digital magazines and ebooks in addition to other web duties.

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