James Foley family's new fund will 'honor what he stood for'

mediawiremorningGood morning. We're nearly there. Here are 10 media stories, plus a fact that made me sigh and quietly review my life choices: The Notorious B.I.G.'s "Ready to Die" came out 20 years ago Saturday.

  1. Foley, Tice parents speak: "I really feel that our country let Jim down," James Foley's mother Diane Foley tells Anderson Cooper. She says her son "was sacrificed because of just a lack of coordination, lack of communication, lack of prioritization." (CNN) | Earlier this week, Austin Tice's parents told Clarissa Ward, "If an American citizen is held hostage overseas, you are discouraged and disparaged if you even consider paying a reward for a precious human child, because you don't know where that reward money's gonna go. ...You know, we're just a mom and dad. We just want our child back, and we wanna do whatever it takes." (CBS News) | A message from the Foley family Twitter account: "please follow our new Twitter account @JamesFoleyFund." (@freejamesfoley) | The fund will "honor what he stood for," the family writes, with plans to build "a resource center for families of American hostages and [foster] a global dialog on governmental policies in hostage crises," among other goals. (James W. Foley Legacy Fund)
  2. Networks say they won't show Rice video anymore: ESPN made that call Tuesday morning, David Bauder reports. "It was obviously quite disturbing and we felt the audience had seen it enough," ESPN spox Josh Krulewitz said. (AP) | Meredith Clark: "Using the video without consent violates our ethical obligation to treat Janay Rice and other survivors of intimate partner violence as people rather than vehicles for social change." (Poynter) | Related: How "did Goodell pick the Rice case to appear insufficiently authoritarian?" Jack Shafer asks. (Reuters)
  3. What a watch-based media landscape may look like: "The Apple Watch also makes a solid case for a more algorithmically curated, condensed Twitter timeline," Dan Frommer writes. "One thing we noticed is the text in Twitter’s app that describes your Timeline: 'New and interesting.'" (Quartz) | "We are about to enter the era of 'glance journalism.'" (Nieman) | Yahoo News Digest already works on Apple Watch, and Circa is looking into it. (BuzzFeed) | Very related: Research from Irene Costera Meijer and Tim Groot Kormelink looks into news consumption, including "Checking and scanning vs snacking and monitoring." (Online Journalism Blog)
  4. Speaking of Yahoo News Digest: Its new iPad app hit the App Store last night. (Yahoo's Tumblr) | Nick D'Aloisio, who heads the Yahoo News Digest team, tells Leo Kelion he is "weighing up university and Yahoo" for next year. (He's 18.) (BBC News)
  5. Attn: NYC tourism folks: Humans of New York blogger Brandon Stanton: "Out of all the countries that I’ve been to, Ukraine reminded me the most of home." (Kyiv Post)
  6. You know how we keep talking about the revenue potential of video ads? Almost 20 percent of that market belongs to YouTube, but that may be as high as it gets. (WSJ)
  7. Intern apologizes: Mallory Musallam wrote a letter to former internship host David Letterman saying she'd withdrawn from a class action suit and had been "approached by a beguiling legion of lawsuit-hungry attorneys." (NYDN)
  8. Vook has bought the ashes of Byliner: "The deal may be good news for Byliner authors who wondered how they were going to get paid," Laura Hazard Owen reports. "Vook said Thursday that it would be paying them 85 percent royalties on works that were already for sale at digital retailers like Amazon and Apple." (Gigaom)
  9. Front page of the day, selected by Kristen Hare: A moving photo on The New York Times. (Courtesy the Newseum.)

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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Kate Lanphear is now editor-in-chief of Maxim. Previously, she was style editor at T Magazine. (WWD) | Kerry Diamond is now editor-in-chief of Yahoo Food. She is the co-founder and editorial director of Cherry Bombe. Kristen Baldwin is editor-in-chief of Yahoo TV. Previously, she was deputy editor at Entertainment Weekly. (Email) | Alice Gabriner will be international photo editor for Time magazine. She was a senior photo editor at National Geographic. Mandy Oaklander will be a staff writer for Time magazine. Previously, she was a senior writer for Prevention.com. Jack Linshi is a breaking news reporter and homepage editor at Time magazine. He was a weekend arts and living editor at the Yale Daily News. Lily Rothman will be an archive editor at Time magazine. Previously, she was a reporter there. Reno Ong will be an audience engagement editor at Time magazine. Previously she was a copy editor there. (Fishbowl DC) | Emma Fitzsimmons is a transit reporter for The New York Times. Previously, she was a reporter there. (NYT Metro desk) | Pamela Henson is now president and publisher of the Appleton (Wisconsin) Post-Crescent. She was senior vice president of advertising, marketing and digital sales at the Milwaukee (Wisconsin) Journal-Sentinel. (Gannett) | Tim Tebow is now a contributor at "Good Morning America." He's a college football analyst for ESPN. (ABC News) | Job of the day: Mashable is looking for a San Francisco-based social media reporter. Get your résumés in! (Mashable) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org.

  • Andrew Beaujon

    Andrew Beaujon reported on the media for Poynter from 2012 to 2015. He was previously arts editor at TBD.com and managing editor of Washington City Paper. He's the author of the 2006 book "Body Piercing Saved My Life," about Christian rock and evangelical Christian culture.

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