NYT corrected Gary Hart story after source's recollection changed

Good morning. Thanks, veterans. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. NYT corrects Gary Hart story

    Former Miami Herald reporter Tom Fiedler disputes the chronology he gave Matt Bai about when he saw Gary Hart's challenge to prove his infidelity. "Therefore, it is likely that the original version of this article, based in large part on Fiedler’s account, referred incorrectly to the point at which any of the Herald journalists first saw the Times article quoting Hart as saying, 'Follow me around,'" the correction reads. "The text has been adjusted accordingly." (NYT) | Bai: "I find it particularly disturbing that Fiedler, someone I'd very much admired, has now invented a new version of events after repeatedly and recently reconfirming his own longstanding account, which is something we as journalists often condemn in the people we cover." (HuffPost)

  2. Journalists and lawyers: A special legal mini-roundup

    ACLU sues St. Louis County police on behalf of Bilgin Şaşmaz, a Turkish journalist arrested in Ferguson in August. "The suit says that Şaşmaz repeatedly said “Press, Press” to identify himself. Caucasian reporters and photographers who were also documenting the incident were not arrested, it says." (St. Louis Post-Dispatch) | Read the suit: (ACLU of Missouri) | Related: AP CEO Gary Pruitt wrote U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and FBI Director James Comey demanding answers about the FBI's impersonation of an AP reporter and seeking "assurances that this won’t happen again." (AP) | Jack Shafer: "Any blurring of the line between government and press can only benefit the government at the expense of the press and the dilution of the best law the country has, the First Amendment." (Reuters) | Also in journalists and courts: Ben Seibert sues Nancy Grace, who incorrectly reported he "invaded a woman's home and snapped a photo of himself on her phone, which she described as a 'textbook serial killer's calling card.'" (AP)

  3. Russia annexes media

    The Kremlin's new Sputnik service "aims to offer an alternative for people who are 'tired of aggressive propaganda promoting a unipolar world and want a different perspective,' according to its press release." (Moscow Times) | For instance, did you know that Miami was on the brink of secession? (BuzzFeed) | "The editor-in-chief of business daily Kommersant has resigned, triggering speculation Monday that he was forced out over a recent article in the newspaper about oil giant Rosneft." (Moscow Times) | CNN will no longer be broadcast in Russia after the end of the year; it ended distribution deals "following the passage of new media laws in Russia." (Mashable)

  4. Washington Post says Zakaria stories are problematic

    Five of the Post articles ID'd as unoriginal by the mysterious media critics @blippoblappo and @crushingbort are "problematic," editorial page Editor Fred Hiatt said. (Poynter) | Slate corrected a 1998 article he wrote. "I have to distinguish my own view here from Slate’s editorial decision, which I respect but don’t agree with," Slate Group boss Jacob Weisberg tells Dylan Byers. (Politico) | The next thing? "Someone from NYC is editing Zakaria's Wikipedia page to remove notes about his plagiarism and fix his mom's name." (@blippoblappo)

  5. NPR's ombudsman search is taking a while

    Edward Schumacher-Matos' last day keeps getting postponed. (Media Moves)

  6. The New Yorker paywall returns

    "We are quite reliably told that" on Tuesday "the Web site of the New Yorker, the last magazine in the world, will no longer offer the entirety of its archives, going back to 2007, for free." (The Awl)

  7. Is it time to forgive Stephen Glass?

    Hanna Rosin visits her former New Republic colleague, who has reassembled his life as a paralegal in California. "When clients come in, Steve helps the firm get them ready for trial. The first thing he does is tell them who he is. He says he worked at a magazine and he lied and made up stories and covered them up. He says he got caught, that Hollywood made a movie about it and that there are many people 'who dislike me and rightly so.'" (The New Republic)

  8. Meanwhile, in Australia

    Reporter drinks camel's milk for a month. (The Advertiser)

  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare

    A chiseled salute to veterans on the Arizona Republic. (Courtesy the Newseum)

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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin

    Greg Jaffe will cover the White House for The Washington Post. Previously, he covered the Pentagon there. Steve Mufson will cover the White House for The Washington Post. He covers the energy industry there. (Washington Post) | Herman Wong has joined the Washington Post's social media team. Previously, he was on the social media team at Quartz. (Washington Post) | Peter Holley is now a reporter on the general assignment desk at The Washington Post. Previously, he was an associate editor at Houstonia magazine. (Washington Post) | Joyce MacDonald is now vice president of journalism at the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Previously, she was interim president and CEO at National Public Media. (Poynter) | Job of the day: The Center (Texas) Light and Champion is looking for a reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Corrections? Tips? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Would you like to get this roundup emailed to you every morning? Sign up here.

  • Andrew Beaujon

    Andrew Beaujon reported on the media for Poynter from 2012 to 2015. He was previously arts editor at TBD.com and managing editor of Washington City Paper. He's the author of the 2006 book "Body Piercing Saved My Life," about Christian rock and evangelical Christian culture.

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