Star Tribune runs ad bashing transgender kids

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. News Corp buys online real estate business: Move, Inc., owns Realtor.com, Move.com and ListHub. News Corp will "turbo-charge traffic growth" to Move's properties, and it will "benefit from the high-quality geographic data generated by real estate searches,” CEO Robert Thomson says. (BusinessWire) | Last year Move "reported $600,000 in profit atop $227 million in revenue." (NYT)
  2. Minneapolis Star Tribune ran an ad bashing transgender kids: The Minnesota Child Protection League ran a full-page ad Sunday in an attempt to influence the Minnesota State High School League, which may "approve a new policy that would allow transgender students to participate in athletics based on their gender identity." Strib VP Steve Yaeger tells Aaron Rupar: "The ad in question met all the requirements of our ad policy." (Minneapolis City Pages) | Earlier this year the Strib took some heat for how it reported on a transgender person. (Minneapolis City Pages)
  3. Esquire botches attack on ESPN: There was no all-male domestic violence panel planned, ESPN said Monday. (Deadspin) | Esquire apologized for that and for "saying that ESPN is not in the business of journalism," Hearst Digital editorial director Kate Lewis writes in a note on the piece. Esquire is owned by Hearst, which has a 20 percent stake in ESPN, Jeremy Barr reports. "A Hearst spokesperson did not respond directly to a Capital inquiry about whether the company's investment in ESPN played a role in the apology." (Capital) | Despite the apology, Esquire kept a sentence that said "ESPN is not a company in the business of journalism" in the story until later that evening. (WP) | Craig Silverman finds articles with the erroneous information were shared far more widely than articles that corrected it. (Emergent)
  4. Roxane Gay will edit cultural criticism site: The Toast has hired the bestselling author to head up a new site called The Butter. (Capital) | Not at all related but this was the only item I could wedge it into: Piers Morgan will write commentary for Daily Mail Online. (Politico)
  5. Newsweek places editor's note over Zakaria archives: "Fareed Zakaria worked for Newsweek when it was under previous ownership," the note, which also rides along on Zakaria's archived articles, says. "Readers are advised that some of his articles have been the subject of complaints claiming that they contain material that should have been attributed to others." (Poynter) | "New Fun Trawling Through Fareed Zakaria's @Newsweek Archives, Part 1" (@blippoblappo)
  6. Will Bill Simmons stay at ESPN? He "did not think that what he said or how he said it was worthy of one of the harshest suspensions in ESPN history," John Ourand reported Friday in a tick-tock of how ESPN decided to put its star on ice. Simmons' contract will be up next year, Ourand writes, and "it will be interesting to see whether this suspension derails those talks." (SportsBusiness Daily) | The clash reflects a generational conflict at ESPN, Jason McIntyre reported Friday. "The old guard has its fingers crossed they can pester and annoy Simmons to the point that he pulls the trigger on a plan they claim he’s been mulling after spending so much time in Hollywood: decamp from ESPN to a venture capital-backed solo operation with contributions from his West Coast buddies Jimmy Kimmel and Adam Carolla." (The Big Lead) | Erik Wemple: Suspensions "are effective primarily in forgetting and neglecting the root causes of the stupidity that materializes on air." (WP)
  7. Chartbeat can now measure readers' attention: The Media Ratings Council has approved Chartbeat's bid to measure attention rather than pageviews or unique visitors. (Gigaom) | "If you’re dealing with something where you can prove attention better, you can charge more," Chartbeat CEO Tony Haile tells Andrew Nusca. (Fortune) | Haile noted in February that there is "effectively no correlation between social shares and people actually reading." (The Verge) | Rick Edmonds in March: "Time to ditch uniques and page views for engagement in measuring digital audiences" (Poynter)
  8. RIP Joe Nawrozki: The investigative reporter worked for three Baltimore newspapers, dug up political corruption among pols, and "taught martial arts for more than 40 years." He died Saturday. He was 70. (The Baltimore Sun)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: Taiwan's Apple Daily fronts the Hong Kong protests. (Courtesy Newseum)

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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Ann Shoket will be a consultant for Hearst. Previously, she was editor-in-chief of Seventeen magazine. (Capital) | Kal Penn will be a special correspondent for Fusion. Previously, he was associate director of the White House's Office of Public Engagement. (Politico) | Richard Tomko is now publisher of amNewYork. Previously, he was a consultant at Boost Digital. (Email) | Tony Brancato is now executive director of Web products and audience development at The New York Times. Previously, he was head of product for the Web there. (The New York Times) | Sandy Johnson is now president and chief operating officer at The National Press Foundation. Previously, she was the excecutive editor at Stateline.org. (National Press Foundation) | Jeff Simon will be a video producer at CNN. He's a producer for The Washington Post. (@jjsimonWP) | Cynthia Littleton will be Variety's managing editor for television. Previously, she was editor-in-chief of television. Claudia Eller and Andrew Wallenstein are now co-editors-in-chief at Variety. Eller was editor-in-chief of film at Variety. Wallenstein was editor-in-chief of digital there. (Variety) | Sonya Thompson will be director of news projects for Tribune Media Group. She was news director for WJW in Cleveland. Mitch Jacob will be news director at WJLA. He was news director for WSYX in Columbus. Jamie Justice will be news director at WSYX in Columbus. Previously, she was assistant news director there. Rob Cartwright is now news director for KEYE in Austin. Previously, he was news director for WSYR in Syracuse. Jeff Houston is now news director for WBMA in Birmingham. Previously, he was an assistant news director there. (Rick Gevers) | James VanOsdol has been named newsroom program manager at Rivet News Radio. He is an anchor at HearHere Radio LLC. (Robert Feder) | Job of the day: Politico is looking for a tax reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org.

  • Andrew Beaujon

    Andrew Beaujon reported on the media for Poynter from 2012 to 2015. He was previously arts editor at TBD.com and managing editor of Washington City Paper. He's the author of the 2006 book "Body Piercing Saved My Life," about Christian rock and evangelical Christian culture.

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