Washington Post employees: Don't email or text while driving!

"Too often we hear from reporters and editors that they are communicating from the car," Washington Post senior editor Tracy Grant tells staffers in a memo. "Beyond the obvious concerns of endangering ourselves and others, there are also potentially significant legal ramifications for both individuals and The Washington Post Company in the event of an accident."



Full memo:

The demanding news cycle sometimes requires us to check email and phones at all times of day and night. Nonetheless, we would like to remind everyone that it is against the law to drive and text or email.

While we appreciate speedy replies to queries, they should not come at the expense of safety. Too often we hear from reporters and editors that they are communicating from the car. Beyond the obvious concerns of endangering ourselves and others, there are also potentially significant legal ramifications for both individuals and The Washington Post Company in the event of an accident. We expect all staff members to pull off the road to a safe place before emailing, texting or talking on the phone. No story is more important than people’s lives.

  • Andrew Beaujon

    Andrew Beaujon reported on the media for Poynter from 2012 to 2015. He was previously arts editor at TBD.com and managing editor of Washington City Paper. He's the author of the 2006 book "Body Piercing Saved My Life," about Christian rock and evangelical Christian culture.

Comments

Related News

Email IconGroup 3Facebook IconLinkedIn IconsearchGroupTwitter IconGroup 2YouTube Icon