Women journalists make 17% less than men

Pew


The median salary of women journalists is 83 percent of their male counterparts' pay, Monica Anderson reports for Pew. That's in line with the national pay gap: "the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics found that median hourly earnings for all women in 2012 amount to 84% of what a man makes," Anderson writes. Anderson's report draws on the most recent Indiana University survey of journalists.

Ken Auletta reported Thursday that ousted New York Times Executive Editor Jill Abramson made a $475,000 salary in her first year in the top job. That's 85 percent of what Auletta reports her predecessor, Bill Keller, was making that year.



Anderson gathers other stats from the annual ASNE census: At newspapers, the percentage of women has "barely budged," she writes, and the percentage of women in supervisory positions has gone up a whopping 1 percent since 1998. Minority representation isn't really taking off, either.



Thanks to @maryfduffy for bringing up the math on the Abramson/Keller salaries.

  • Andrew Beaujon

    Andrew Beaujon reported on the media for Poynter from 2012 to 2015. He was previously arts editor at TBD.com and managing editor of Washington City Paper. He's the author of the 2006 book "Body Piercing Saved My Life," about Christian rock and evangelical Christian culture.

Comments

Related News

Email IconGroup 3Facebook IconLinkedIn IconsearchGroupTwitter IconGroup 2YouTube Icon