Why NYT journalists are essentially stuck in China

November 13, 2014
Category: Uncategorized

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Why New York Times journalists can’t leave China

    The country’s visa backlog puts people currently stationed there “in an unenviable professional position: Should they leave their posts, they can be pretty sure at this point that their editor won’t be able to replace them.” (WP) | “At a news conference in Beijing alongside President Obama, China’s leader, Xi Jinping, appeared to draw a link between unfavorable coverage and access for reporters, saying that the visa problems of news organizations were of their own making.” (NYT) | NYT editorial: “A confident regime that considers itself a world leader should be able to handle truthful examination and criticism.” (NYT)

  2. Washington Post appends multiple editor’s notes to Zakaria columns

    David Folkenflik noticed they were up. (@davidfolkenflik). | Notes are on four of the six columns flagged by the mysterious media critics @blippoblappo and @crushingbort (1, 2, 3, 4). One didn’t take a note. One article is archived. | Washington Post editorial page Editor Fred Hiatt says Zakaria “will remain on his op-ed roster.” (The Daily Beast)

  3. Jeff Bezos, weaver of metaphors

    After he invested in Business Insider, the Amazon boss (and Washington Post owner) told Henry Blodget “you are just a little flame. And the flame has been kindled, and it’s in the palm of your hand, and all around you, these big winds are swirling. And if you’re not paying attention, they can snuff that flame out, immediately.” (Re/code)

  4. Chicago Tribune won’t rush to replace Jane Hirt

    Its managing editor announced yesterday she would step down. (Chicago Tribune) | “No deadline has been set to name a successor.” (Robert Feder)

  5. Morning shows are your home for political ads

    “The nation’s marquee network morning shows — ‘Good Morning America,’ ‘Today’ and ‘CBS This Morning’ — attracted more U.S. Senate race-focused ads during the 2014 midterm elections than any other television programs.” “GMA” showed “nearly 30,000 U.S. Senate-focused ads during the 2014 election cycle.” (The Center for Public Integrity)

  6. Your Twitter experience is going to change

    The company is “exploring ways to surface relevant Tweets so the content that is interesting to you is easy to discover – whether you stay on Twitter all day or visit for a few minutes,” VP of product Kevin Weil writes. (Twitter Blog) | “There’s a dilemma at the core of Twitter’s growth problem: The very features Twitter power users love about the platform — retweets, favorites and hashtags, its distinct vocabulary — are the ones that make the service so inscrutable to the newcomer.” (Digiday) | Related: “Twitter said it could generate long term margins of 40 to 45 per cent – higher than the forecast for margins of 35 to 40 per cent it made during its initial public offering last year – partly because of a greater use of targeted advertising than it had predicted.” (FT)

  7. Jian Ghomeshi showed the CBC a video of an injured woman

    The video, on the former CBC radio host’s phone, “shows bruising to the woman’s body (she is partially covered in the video) and information provided to CBC that weekend, including text messages Ghomeshi had on his phone, refer to a ‘cracked rib,'” Kevin Donovan reports. “A large bruise could be seen on the side of her body.” (Toronto Star)

  8. A new job description

    Journalism: a fancy word for the industry in which stock photos are resized.” (Gawker)

  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare

    The Washington Post’s Express illustrates the U.S.-China climate change deal. (Courtesy the Newseum)
    express-11132014 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin

    Alan English is now publisher of The (Shreveport, Louisiana) Times. Previously, he was general manager there. (Gannett) | James O’Byrne is now vice president of innovation for NOLA Media Group. Previously, he was director of state content there. Marcus Carmouche is now director of sports at NOLA Media Group. Previously, he was sports manager there. John Roach will be sports manager at NOLA Media Group. Previously, he was a sports managing producer there. Mark Lorando will direct state and metro content for NOLA.com. Previously, he was director of metro content there. (NOLA.com) | Meredith Artley is now editor-in-chief of CNN Digital. Previously, she was managing editor of CNN.com. Andrew Morse is now general manager of CNN Digital. He is senior vice president of CNN U.S. Alex Wellen is now chief product officer at CNN Digital. Previously, he was vice president of business, products, and strategy there. (Email) | Job of the day: Cox Media Group is looking for a digital content editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Corrections? Tips? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Would you like to get this roundup emailed to you every morning? Sign up here.