High School Journalism Program (July 2021)

$395.00

Apply Now
July 12, 2021– July 23, 2021

High School Journalism Program (July 2021)

By the end of this prestigious and intensive online program, you will have produced a multimedia story of your choosing and written a personal essay, under the instruction of world-renowned Poynter faculty.

Overview

  • Learn from globally renowned Poynter faculty and award-winning media professionals
  • Start building your portfolio! You will produce a multimedia story and a personal essay
  • Give yourself an edge as you apply for student media, internships or competitive collegiate programs
  • Develop relationships with people from all over the country who are passionate about the media
  • Form valuable connections with professional journalists in jobs you want
  • Tune in for 10 days of interactive learning, with both asynchronous and synchronous sessions
  • Apply by June 14, 2021

$395.00

Apply Now

Learning Outcomes

Accepted participants in the High School Journalism Program in July will:

  • Wrestle with journalism ethics
  • Discover secrets to good storytelling
  • Think critically about defining “the media”
  • Improve their understanding of disinformation, misinformation and reliability
  • Develop a more authentic voice in personal writing
  • Apply professional fact-checking skills across social media platforms

$395.00

Apply Now

Overview

  • Learn from globally renowned Poynter faculty and award-winning media professionals
  • Start building your portfolio! You will produce a multimedia story and a personal essay
  • Give yourself an edge as you apply for student media, internships or competitive collegiate programs
  • Develop relationships with people from all over the country who are passionate about the media
  • Form valuable connections with professional journalists in jobs you want
  • Tune in for 10 days of interactive learning, with both asynchronous and synchronous sessions
  • Apply by June 14, 2021

Training five or more people?
Check out our custom training.

Who fights to make public COVID-19 data, such as how many cases have been reported in your school district or the infection rate at your grandparent’s nursing home? Who holds politicians accountable for their policies and promises on issues like climate change or gun violence? Who can say what is happening on the ground when bystander and official reports conflict? Journalists!

If you want to affect change, shine a light on issues that affect your friends and family, and have a passion for finding facts, journalism might be the path for you. We invite you to apply for the Poynter Institute’s prestigious High School Journalism Program this summer.


This High School Journalism Program is in July. Won’t work? Check out our June program!


You can expect personalized instruction from globally renowned Poynter faculty and award-winning media professionals delivered in a high-production online learning environment. You’ll get a cutting-edge journalism 101 education that can launch you into a communications program in college, set you up for an internship, or help you apply to your student paper. And importantly, you will develop relationships with your class and form valuable connections with working journalists from across the country.

By the end of the intensive, 10-day online program, you will have produced a multimedia story of your choosing and written a personal essay.

Program History

The Poynter Institute for Media Studies is a global leader in journalism education and a strategy center that stands for uncompromising excellence in journalism, media and 21st-century public discourse. Tens of thousands of professional journalists train with Poynter each year, whether online or in person. The media organizations you rely on — including The Washington Post, NPR, USA Today, National Geographic, the Associated Press, Google, Facebook and hundreds of local newspapers and TV stations — work directly with Poynter to stay relevant, develop leaders, grapple with ethics issues and more. Poynter is also the home of the Pulitzer Prize-winning PolitiFact, the International Fact-Checking Network and MediaWise, a digital information literacy project for young people, first-time voters and senior citizens.

The High School Journalism Program is one of the longest-running programs at Poynter. Founded along with the Institute in 1975, its goal is to give young people the chance to learn about writing and develop a passion for the values and craft of journalism.

It was formerly open only to high school students near our St. Petersburg, Florida campus, but we completely redesigned the program in 2020 and made it available online to high school students across the U.S.

Questions?

If you need assistance, email us at info@newsu.org.

This program takes place July 12-23, 2021. Students will attend live video sessions for 90 minutes each weekday of the 10-day program (11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Eastern); sessions will be recorded and available for replay. Students should expect to work for an additional 90-120 minutes of activities and opportunities outside of the video lessons. In total, participants should be willing to dedicate 3-4 hours a day to participate.

This year’s schedule will be released as speakers and activities are finalized. Below is last year’s schedule, which demonstrates the types of sessions and activities you can expect.

Day 1: Welcome

An introduction to the program tools, schedule, process and participants

On your own: Writing process

Day 2: Defining “the media”

We hear people blame, praise and critique “the media” all the time. This live session will provide a clear and useful definition of “the media” and explain why it’s so vital to understand what that phrase really means.

On your own: Finding your voice

Day 3: Covering COVID-19, uncovering truth

Learn from a Tampa Bay Times reporter about the creative ways they’ve reported on the coronavirus crisis in Florida.

On your own: Narrowing focus/snapshot of a moment

Day 4: MediaWise fact-checking strategies

Learn from multimedia reporters leading Poynter’s MediaWise project about how they approach the fact-checking process and publish the truth in social-first video formats.

On your own: Writing for the ear

Day 5: Finding a fact(check)

During this fully interactive session, we will take a look at your sources of information, from news feeds to TikToks, and learn how to examine everything just a little more closely and carefully. Assignment: Choose an item from your feed to fact-check.

On your own: Hot spots/stick the landing

Day 6: Keeping politicians honest 

Senior editors at the Pulitzer Prize-winning PolitiFact will discuss how fact-checking and accountability journalism serves democracy.

On your own: Editing your writing (and start scheduling one-on-one coaching time)

Day 7: 21st century tools for storytelling

Move beyond writing and filming stories and learn new tools to tell stories and communicate vital information. You will leave this session with ready-to-use tools and tips.

On your own: Recording your voice

Day 8: Editing for clarity and correctness

As a vital process for holding the powerful accountable, fact-checking relies on honest, ethical reporting. Take a deep dive into what it really means to make sure you’ve got just the facts and see how editors ensure the quality of every fact check.

On your own: Adding images/bringing voice to life with b-roll

Day 9: New roles in new media roundtable discussion

Join professionals from a wide variety of media backgrounds as they answer your questions and discuss what it takes to seek and report truth in today’s world.

On your own: The final polish

Day 10: Graduation and sharing final products

Who should apply

Students who are in 8th through 12th grades who are interested in journalism, writing, photography or storytelling with video should apply. This workshop is great for students who work in student media or are considering majoring in journalism, mass communications or integrated marketing communications. Class size is limited to allow for more personalized instruction.

The deadline to apply is Monday, June 14, 2021.

Application process

The application asks you to write a short essay, 50 to 100 words, telling us about your interest in this program and why you’d like to participate. This is the most important component of your application, so please spend some time on it. Tell us about your involvement (if any) in student media, your interest in journalism and storytelling and how you hope this workshop will help you.

Cost

Tuition for the two-week training is $395 per student.

Scholarships are available, including a limited number that will make the program tuition-free for selected participants.

Students applying for financial aid may request it in the online application as part of their “essay of interest.” Tell us whether you qualify for free or reduced school lunch and any special circumstances you want us to consider.

In order to complete your application, we require authorization of payment. Your card will not be charged until you are accepted into the program. Upon acceptance to the program you will receive an email notification and your credit card payment will be processed.

Technology requirements

You will need access to a smartphone, tablet or digital camera so you can take journalistic photos to share with the group. You will also need high-speed Internet access for a desktop computer, laptop or tablet. Minimum software requirements are specified below:

Windows

  • 1.4 GHz Intel Pentium 4 or faster processor (or equivalent)
  • Windows 10, 8.1 (32-bit/64-bit), Windows 7 (32-bit/64-bit)
  • 512 MB of RAM (1 GB recommended)
  • Browser: Microsoft Internet Explorer 11 or later, Windows Edge browser, Mozilla Firefox or Google Chrome

Mac OS

  • 1.83 GHz Intel Core Duo or faster processor
  • 512 MB RAM (1 GB recommended)
  • Mac OS X 10.11, 10.12 and 10.13
  • Browser: Mozilla Firefox, Apple Safari or Google Chrome

 

Instructors

Lead Faculty

Past Instructors

  • Eric Deggans
    TV Critic, NPR
    Eric Deggans is NPR's first full-time TV critic. Deggans came to NPR in 2013 from the Tampa Bay Times, where he served a TV/Media Critic and...
    Read More
  • Angie Drobnic Holan
    Editor-in-Chief, PolitiFact
    Angie Drobnic Holan is the editor-in-chief of PolitiFact. She previously was an editor, deputy editor and reporter for PolitiFact, helping launch the site in 2007....
    Read More
  • Ren LaForme
    Managing Editor
    Ren LaForme is the managing editor of Poynter.org. He was previously Poynter's digital tools reporter, chronicling tools and technology for journalists, and a producer for...
    Read More
  • Heaven Taylor-Wynn
    Multimedia Reporter, MediaWise Project
    Heaven Taylor-Wynn is a digital journalist who joined MediaWise in 2019 shortly after graduating from the University of Florida’s College of Journalism and Communications. The...
    Read More
  • Alexa Volland
    Multimedia Reporter, MediaWise
    Alexa Volland is a multimedia reporter with the MediaWise project. Before joining Poynter, she was the web editor for the Tampa Bay Times' high school...
    Read More
  • Kathleen McGrory
    Tampa Bay Times deputy editor, investigations
    Kathleen McGrory is the deputy investigations editor and an investigative reporter at the Tampa Bay Times. Her series on a Johns Hopkins children’s hospital unearthed an...
    Read More

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