editing

Poynter Results

  • Storytelling

    Article

    3 guidelines for effective content on social platforms

    Posting on social doesn’t mean you should post the same thing on every platform. Each platform (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.,) has unique qualities, different strengths and purposes, and a specific best use case.

    Your goal is to share content in a way that is natural for users on that social platform. You want to offer relevant content that your audience can engage with. To craft effective, engaging content for any platform, answer these questions:

  • Tips/Training

    Article

    5 fact-checking tips for editors

    Facts matter in all types of writing, especially in news and informational texts. Errors of fact can damage a writer's credibility and cause embarrassment, and they can irritate readers. Many fact errors are preventable, and that's where editors come in. Your first step is to identify the potential fact errors in the writing. Here are next steps:

  • Tips/Training

    Article

    10 questions for your headline-writing checklist

    • Is it accurate? There’s no such thing as “kind of” accurate. When you check a headline, take note of each word and make sure it’s correct.
    • Does it undersell the story? The headline might be accurate, but it might not make the story’s point strongly enough. The headline should be as strong as the content allows.
    • Does it oversell the story? You want it to be strong, but you don’t want to cheat the reader.
  • Tips/Training

    Article

    10 questions for your headline-writing checklist

    Headlines are lifelines to our readers. They grab attention, build trust and help time-pressed consumers focus on the stories they care most about. How do you ensure that they are engaging as well as accurate? Here are 10 questions to ask when you are writing (or editing) headlines.

  • Tips/Training

    Article

    9 tips for writing stronger headlines

    Headlines are lifelines to our readers. They grab attention, build trust and help time-pressed consumers focus on the stories they care most about. Here are nine ways to write engaging, accurate headlines for any platform.

  • Leadership

    Article

    How to move from 'editor' to 'coach'

    Every editor must learn to fix stories, but fixing is not the same as coaching. Coaching is the human side of editing. In other words, the editor coaches the writer — but fixes the story.

    Before an editor can successfully coach a reporter, you need to know who he or she is. A simple "getting to know you" interview with a reporter can reveal a lot of information that you can use to be a more effective coach. Consider asking a writer these questions:

  • Tips/Training

    Article

    5 ways to proofread your writing

    Mistakes can lurk in your writing, whether it's a story, article, blurb, e-book, caption, tweet, menu, flier, Facebook status, blog post, script, advertisement, graphic novel, comic, brochure, editorial, email, manifesto, letter, birthday card, bumper sticker, wedding invitation, classified ad or graffiti.

    One cause of errors: You tend to read (or edit) with your memory rather than to actively read what's on the screen. Your brain fills in the gaps in the writing and doesn't notice typos, duplicated words or mistakes you've introduced while you were revising your work.

  • Tips/Training

    Article

    3 tips for editing your own writing

    Everybody needs an editor, but there are times when you are the only set of eyes to read what you've written. Whether you're writing a tweet, a breaking news story, an email or a book, here are some ways to read your work with fresh eyes, and find and fix mistakes before you hit send.

    Sweat the small stuff. Articles--"a," "an" and "the"--are often misused or mis-typed when you're writing quickly. And it's easy to overlook "or" when you mean "of" or "it" when you mean "if" or "is."

  • Storytelling

    Article

    10 ways to engage readers with alternative story forms

    Non-traditional news story forms go by many names: charticles, non-narratives, storytelling devices, alternative story forms, ASFs and alts, among others. Some stand alone as a story, and some are supplemental: forms that clarify, complement and explain information in a traditional news story.

    Here's a look at some supplemental forms, with tips on how to use them effectively.

  • Tips/Training

    Article

    3 ways to find and fix mistakes in your writing

    In the crush of deadline, it's easy for mistakes to creep into your writing. Even more, errors can happen at any point in the process. Whether you're writing a tweet, a breaking news story, an email or a book, here are some ways to find and fix those mistakes before you hit send.

Email IconGroup 3Facebook IconLinkedIn IconsearchGroupTwitter IconGroup 2YouTube Icon