interviewing

Poynter Results

  • Tips/Training

    Article

    2 tips when interviewing for audio stories

    The basics of good interviewing apply to an audio story. But there are additional factors for audio narratives, especially if you’re planning to tell the story without the benefit of a reporter or narrator. Here are some tips for producing non-narrated stories:

    Ask the person speaking to say their name and occupation in the form of a sentence. This serves several purposes.

  • Tips/Training

    Article

    5 tips for video interviews

    Seeing, for many viewers, is believing. But to really “understand” requires explanation and context. That is a key role journalists fill. When you're interviewing a person, you want to capture more than the interview. Here are some tips for b-roll and other ways to add context to your story.

  • Tips/Training

    Article

    Questions to ask public relations staff when you're covering scientific research

    Journalists talk to a variety of sources about scientific research. Different types of sources have different qualifications and can provide different types of information. Here are some considerations and questions when you are interviewing public relations staff in the industry you are covering.

    For subject matter expertise, ask:

    • Does this person have academic credentials related to this topic? A client history?

    In the interview, ask:

  • Commentary

    Article

    The Donald dilemma: How does one really interview Trump?

    ABC's George Stephanopoulos confronted a two-legged steamroller and inadvertently raised this question: How does one interview Donald Trump?

    During an 18-minute interview, ABC's "This Week" host employed a traditional journalism modus operandi last week. Well prepared, he firmly but diplomatically asked questions on disputed Trump statements, seeming hypocrisies and even apparent fabrications.

  • Tips/Training

    Article

    Questions to ask scientists about scientific research

    Journalists talk to a variety of sources about scientific research. Different types of sources have different qualifications and can provide different types of information. Here are some considerations and questions when you are interviewing scientists.

    To understand their academic background, check:

    • Educational background
    • Number of publications
    • Lack of retractions on RetractionWatch.com

    Questions to ask:

  • Tips/Training

    Article

    Are you asking "green-light" questions in your interviews?

    In an interview, questions can be keys that open a door to a person’s life or beliefs. Or, they can act as padlocks, barring you from discovering the information and stories you need to do your job. Good questions make the difference between an answer and a quotable answer. Reporters just starting out often blame taciturn sources -- stonewalling police, tight-lipped lawyers, paranoid neighbors --- when the questions you ask may be the problem. Be sure you’re asking green-light questions.

  • Tips/Training

    Article

    How to include solutions in your interviews on social issues

    Solutions journalism offers rigorous and compelling coverage about responses to social problems. As part of your reporting, consider these approaches to interviewing a wide range of stakeholders, including the people enacting the solution, those directly affected, detractors, funders, academics and more.

    Replace “Whodunnit?” with “Howdunnit?”

  • Tips/Training

    Article

    How to prepare for an interview with a source

    The effective interviewer knows what he or she wants from an interview. That’s what John Brady, author of “The Craft of Interviewing,” thinks. The interviewer is like a chess player, he says, never moving a piece or asking a question without a greater purpose.

    Here’s what to ask yourself at the outset of reporting:

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