Local Innovation

Local Innovation

The Local Innovation channel chronicles the efforts of media organizations to make the transition to sustainable digital publishing.

Here's where you'll read stories about the transformation of local and regional journalism, learn more about our teaching in the Poynter Local News Innovation Program, and join the conversation in our newsletter, Local Edition.

The Local News Innovation channel is supported in part by a grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation as part of the Knight-Lenfest Newsroom Initiative.

Poynter Results

  • Innovation

    Article

    Midterm coverage ideas worth borrowing for 2020

    It’s over. Now life gets back to normal. Just kidding, who has time to be normal? So here are some ideas from local and national newsrooms that you might need for 2020.

    Help people understand the issues: In Boston, public radio station WGBH’s digital team took the election trivia they collected and made it into a “Wheel of Fortune”-style quiz.

  • Innovation

    Article

    This street reporting project gives voice to Reno’s homeless

    The stories of people who are homeless are often hidden, a young journalist has learned, and they’re often familiar.

    Jordan Blevins, a journalism student at the Reynolds School of Journalism at the University of Nevada, Reno, finds a different one each time she and fellow reporter Prince Nesta go looking for subjects in Reno.  

  • Culture

    Article

    Advice for women in local news from women in local news

    A few times a year, a group of women who are leaders in newsrooms around the world comes to Poynter for a week. One of the things that strikes me with each class is how much better it is because of the women there who work in local news.

    Most of them work in newsrooms with very few resources. And most of them love covering local news despite that. They’re entrepreneurs, they’re talented journalists and they’re leading change in their newsrooms.

  • Innovation

    Article

    3 cool ideas to steal from local news

    One of the best things about going to journalism conferences, other than getting to socialize with other journalists, is all the ideas you can take home with you. At many conferences, you get them one session at a time. But at the annual conference for Local Independent Online News Publishers, they come at you one after another.

  • Innovation

    Article

    Local Independent Online News Publishers gets $100,000 grant from Facebook

    LION, Local Independent Online News Publishers, announced at the start of its annual conference in Chicago that it has received a $100,000 grant from Facebook. The grant supports that group's work helping journalists "make the transition to running their own online news business and others who have stepped up to fill gaps in local journalism across the country," according to a press release.

  • Innovation

    Article

    This series is traveling the country to show why local news matters

    The 10 newsrooms Ian Hoppe has visited this year — from Jackson, Mississippi, to Carbondale, Illinois, to Los Angeles, California— are all changing.

    Some still work from their original buildings. Some have moved. Almost all are smaller.

    “But the reporters are still grinding away,” said Hoppe. “They don’t really need some special spot or a flashy newsroom. They’re still grinding and doing their thing.”

  • Storytelling

    Article

    Notebooks are magic and other lessons from working with kid journalists

    On Monday, Rich Zahradnik stopped by the elementary school for a quick word with his editors. He found the fifth graders on the playground. Soon, he was surrounded by 10 fourth graders who really wanted to write for the Colonial Times, too.

    “I’ve told people I couldn’t go back and work with adults,” said Zahradnik, a former journalist who worked at places including CNN and Bloomberg and is now a novelist. “Kids are a lot more fun to work with. They revel in it. They celebrate it. They want to be doing it.”

  • Innovation

    Article

    When the paper they were writing for folded, the kids started their own

    Editor's note: This story has been updated with a comment from the publisher of The Pelhams-Plus and the editor of The Pelham Post, and the headline has been updated. 

    Francesca Di Cristofano stood up in front of her junior year chemistry class at Pelham Memorial High School and told everyone she had an announcement to make.

    The town’s newspaper had fallen apart. It needed a new one. She wanted her classmates to sign up and help make that happen.

 
Email IconGroup 3Facebook IconLinkedIn IconsearchGroupTwitter IconGroup 2YouTube Icon