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  • Commentary

    Article

    Getting LGBT news worldwide

    New LGBT news source, disbelieving the Saudis, fund launches to promote membership for news orgs

    Antonio Zappulla had worked for two years to build a platform to get LBGT news out to the 1 billion people worldwide who access Reuters news daily.

  • Commentary

    Article

    Why they kill journalists

    It's not just Khashoggi; a big move at NPR; PEN America sues Trump

    For 14 years, Kathleen Carroll ran The Associated Press with the clear, direct, grounded language for which the news service is known. As chair of the Committee to Protect Journalists, she still doesn't mince words.

    Asked about Jamal Khashoggi and the slayings of other journalists in recent years, Carroll answered simply: “Someone feels they have the right to kill someone because they disagree with them. ... If these murders go unanswered, the killers are further empowered."

  • Commentary

    Article

    Van Natta's expanded roles point to power of curation

    New ESPN, newsletter roles; phony Saudi 'fact-checking' site bounced by Twitter; more lobbyists, CEOs flee Saudi ties

    Catfishing. A fake girlfriend. A football player emerging amid this scandal as a Heisman finalist, and then onto a pro career with the Chargers and the Saints.

    What don't we know about Manti Te'o and his bizarre turn at Notre Dame? That's the challenge ahead of Don Van Natta Jr. and "Backstory," his upcoming docu-series at ESPN. The linebacker's story is the pilot for the five-part series. 

  • Commentary

    Article

    The Khashoggi case: Not ‘going away without answers’

    Saudi shudders; an LAT/NYT partnership?; the Rae Carruth podcast; secrets of a 12-year-old reporter

    The reported murder of Washington Post contributor Jamal Khashoggi, allegedly ordered by Saudi Arabia’s violent, volatile 33-year-old crown prince, has created a perfect storm of outrage.

    A PR firm and a think tank ditched contracts. High-profile business leaders quit working with the Saudis. Media partners deserted an upcoming Saudi business conference. A bipartisan U.S. Congress called for punishment of Saudi Arabia.

  • Commentary

    Article

    A reporter sought a public record, ended up in a two-year legal battle. She won.

    Keeping government honest; deserting Saudi Arabia; purged by Facebook

    The process server rode a bicycle to Beth Slovic's Portland home. He propped it against her white picket fence before ringing her bell at dinnertime. When the veteran journalist came to the door, he told her that she’d been sued.

    She'd had the temerity to ask the Oregon city's public schools for a list of employees on administrative leave, a public record that is normally a routine matter.

 
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