Articles about "Journalism education and training"


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Every American needs ‘the critical thinking skills of a journalist,’ university says

The Brookings Institution

Stony Brook University in New York teaches a course in “news literacy” to students based on the idea that “every student in America should acquire the critical thinking skills of a journalist.”

Why would anyone prize the skill set that comes with a job that just edged out lumberjack in a recent report on desirable careers?

“The reason is simple,” James Klurfeld and Howard Schneider write in a new paper published by the Brookings Institution Wednesday:

In the Digital Age, the ultimate check against the spread of rumor, pernicious falsehood, disinformation, and unverified reports masquerading as fact, will never be just more and better-trained journalists and professional gatekeepers. Instead, it will require a generation of astutely educated news consumers, as well as native producers and distributors, who will learn to be their own editors and identify for themselves fact-and- evidence-based news and information.

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Morning media roundup: Anonymous sources, FOIA ‘terrorism,’ Chelsea Clinton’s salary

Twice in the last two weeks, New York Times reporters got burned by anonymous sources, Jack Shafer writes. The Times and The Washington Post “tend to rely more heavily on” anonymous sources “than other print outlets” — “In the past four days, the Post cited unnamed sources in at least 18 pieces and the Times did the same in 17 stories ranging from the Iraq civil war to a smartphone app that predicts what a user will type next.”

• “I have nothing against anonymous sources who help guide reporters toward the verifiable — I just draw the line at routinely printing what they say,” Shafer writes.

10 MEDIA STORIES

  1. Jason Leopold was a sloppy journalist who realized that FOIA scoops meant “no one sharing it had to worry about whether they could trust the person who had unearthed the documents; they only had to trust the documents themselves.” Jason Fagone writes a fascinating profile of a self-described “FOIA terrorist.” (Matter)
  2. Former employees at the Salt Lake Tribune have filed suit to suspend changes to the newspaper’s joint operating agreement with the Deseret News.
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Letter from Poynter India’s Workshop Team

Kochi, India, Workshop Participants. March 25, 2014 — One of the nicest traditions at The Poynter Institute is the seminar photograph. This is a record of a special time with colleagues and faculty and of new friends made.

When I first thought about the idea of bringing a group of faculty members to India to conduct a series of workshops, I had that moment of self doubt that affects most of my new or innovative projects. That pesky inner voice of doubt whispered: What could we teach that would be relevant? What will the participants want from our teaching? Would we have an impact?

After three workshops and traveling more than 500 miles within India (not counting the 8,000 miles to get here), I found my answers (and doubt silencer) in a participant’s tweet:

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Shown are the main offices of the San Francisco Chronicle newspaper in San Francisco, Friday, March 13, 2009.(AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

S.F. Chronicle social ‘boot camp’ changing culture, practices

The 148-year-old San Francisco Chronicle has invested in an off-site incubator for its journalists to learn about and experiment with a variety of digital tools, including social media. PBS Media Shift explored goals of the “boot camp” in January.

Now that the effort is underway, I reached out to Marcus Gilmer, newsroom social media manager at the Chronicle and Sfgate.com. (He and I worked together at the Chicago Sun-Times last year.) Gilmer joined the Chronicle in December and has spent time at the incubator teaching social media skills and tools to reporters and editors. (This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.)… Read more

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What’s in a name? Not ‘journalism’ for some universities adapting to industry changes

Fulcrum

On Wednesday, Adam Feibel reported in the University of Ottawa’s Fulcrum that the Canadian school’s journalism program would remain in a freeze for another year.

Admission to the program was frozen for the current academic year after a 2012 report to the university senate called the program “deeply troubled” and suggested its elimination. In August, it was revealed the program would be suspended in order to undergo improvements and would be reopened for the 2014–15 school year.

But it’s not quite there yet.

The university won’t be accepting any new students to the program next year, either. In an email to the Fulcrum, program coordinator Evan Potter said the university needed more time to review the program, and that the faculty and department are in discussion about where to go from here.

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SXSW Interactive and Film Festival attendees crowd the Austin Convention Center, Saturday, March 9, 2013 in Austin, Texas.(AP Photo/Jack Plunkett)

Poynter at SXSW: Welcome back to the WED dance

Editor’s Note: Poynter will be at South by Southwest, the annual music, movie and interactive festival, March 7-16, in Austin, Texas. Look for our Poynter faculty members, Roy Peter Clark, Ellyn Angelotti and Kelly McBride, and digital media reporter Sam Kirkland. Here is the first in a series of posts on what we’ll be doing at SXSW.

One of the great libels against newspapers is that they’re averse to change. It’s true that newspapers could have changed more to forestall their decline. But they have changed — the newspaper of 2014 little resembles the newspaper of 1984.

I recall Orwell’s famous year – 1984 – as a tumultuous one in the history of the news business. Old gray papers were suddenly filled with color. Vertical columns gave way to modular boxes.… Read more

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WVU drops ‘journalism’ from j-school’s name

The Daily Athenaeum | The Charleston Gazette

West Virginia University’s Perley Isaac Reed School of Journalism will rename itself the Reed College of Media, Carlee Lammers reports in the school’s independent Daily Athenaeum.

“We thought our name wasn’t necessarily reflective of really where we are right now with our programs and where we want to go,” Dean Maryanne Reed (no relation) tells the paper.

“Journalism is, of course, important to the school. We will always teach journalism,” she said. “We don’t know what will be under our umbrella in years to come as the industry changes. So, everything we do intersects with media.”

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Journalism education site hopes to become hub for ‘solutions journalism’

EducationShift

PBS’ MediaShift launched a site focused on journalism education Wednesday. EducationShift hopes to become “the central hub for journalism educators, students and professionals to find resources, tools and support for transforming their work,” University of Wisconsin professor Katy Culver writes in an introductory post. Culver, who has taught and written for Poynter, is EducationShift’s curator.

EducationShift went live with a collection of articles that suggest its focus will indeed be on “solutions journalism,” as Culver puts it: Sue Robinson on “Creating a Social Media Class Out of Nothing“; Erica Salkin on how student journalists can avoid legal scuffles; Irving Washington on how to win a challenge grant for journalism education. The effort is funded by Knight and its “charter sponsor” is Scripps College of Communication at Ohio University.… Read more

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PoynterVision: For Journalism teaches journos to code

Dave Stanton introduces For Journalism, a platform aiming to equip journalists with technical skills to succeed in data journalism jobs.

Stanton, ringleader of the Kickstarter-backed project, and a stellar team of working journalists including those from NPR, ProPublica and the Associated Press have created courses with screencasts, code repositories and discussion forums targeted at mid-career journalists, students and professors. Participants work on real-world projects that can be implemented immediately in the newsroom.


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Related: Live chat on what students need to know about code and data viz | PoynterVision: Create a data résumé | Live chat on how journalists can learn to code — and why it’s importantRead more

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Texas A&M brings back journalism major

KBTX-TV

Texas A&M will bring its major in journalism back next fall, the school reported on its website Monday. The decision was announced after approval Monday from the faculty senate.

According to the school: “It will be a small, rigorous program limited to 25 entering freshmen per year.” Students will also have to pursue two minors.

 

Ten years ago, True Brown was a junior pursuing a journalism major and the editor of the student newspaper. He helped start a petition opposing ending the major and a web site dedicated to preserving the program.… Read more

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