How Any Journalist Can Earn Trust

DEADLINE: Nov. 29, 2019
TEACHING DATE: Feb. 10, 2020
LOCATION: The Poynter Institute
COST: $39

This workshop has a value of $500. Thanks to the generosity of the Knight Foundation, we are able to offer it for $39.


Stop thinking of distrust in journalism as an unsolvable, big-picture problem. Instead, find concrete ways everyone in your organization can work to demonstrate credibility and *earn* trust every day.

It starts with understanding what roadblocks stand in the way of having a better relationship with the people your organization aims to serve. Then you can work to effectively defend and explain your work, and be proactive about demonstrating your integrity and credibility.

In this one-day workshop with the leaders of Trusting News:

  • You’ll hear what we’ve learned about the most common causes of mistrust. (Some of them will feel all too familiar, and some may surprise you.)
  • You’ll see what newsrooms are already doing to address mistrust, and how we know it’s working. Our focus is on day-to-day solutions any journalist can employ — you’re guaranteed to be exposed to ideas you can put into practice right away.
  • You’ll bring your professional challenges with trust and credibility, and we’ll map out plans to address them directly.
  • You’ll leave the workshop feeling more optimistic about your relationship with your community.
  • You’ll be ready to empower your colleagues (in every department, at every level) to take ownership of the problem of trust.

Trusting News is a project of the Reynolds Journalism Institute and American Press Institute and launched in 2016. Since then, Trusting News staff has been working with news organizations to help them understand distrust, employ audience feedback strategies and demonstrate credibility.

Instructors

Joy Mayer

Joy Mayer
Director
Trusting News

Joy founded Trusting News in 2016 after a 20-year career in newsrooms and teaching. She spent 12 years at the Missouri School of Journalism, where she created an audience engagement curriculum and a community outreach team in the newsroom of the Columbia Missourian and also taught web design and print design. In addition to serving as the director of Trusting News, she is an adjunct faculty member at The Poynter Institute and the community manager for Gather, a platform to support engaged journalists.

Lynn Walsh

Lynn Walsh
Assistant Director
Trusting News

Lynn is an Emmy award-winning journalist who has worked in investigative journalism at the national level and locally in California, Ohio, Texas and Florida. She is the current Ethics Chair for the Society of Professional Journalists and a past national president for the organization. Based in San Diego, Lynn is also an adjunct professor and freelance journalist.

You will learn

  • How to understand your specific audience’s mistrust and how to address it
  • How to invite people to see your work as credible
  • How to get credit for the work you’re doing
  • How to build trust through transparency and help your audience better understand the news overall
  • How to deploy evidence-based strategies to actively demonstrate credibility and earn trust
  • Insight into fundamental questions related to the future of the industry

Who should take this course

Journalists who want to do something about the problem of mistrust in news should enroll in this workshop. The material is appropriate for newsroom journalists, editors and cross-functional team members on any level. Multiple people from the same news organization are encouraged to apply and attend as a group.

Cost

This workshop has a value of $500. Thanks to the generosity of the Knight Foundation, we are able to offer it for $39.

Travel scholarships are available to help diverse newsrooms and journalists offset costs.

Questions?

We’d love to hear from you. Email us at seminars@poynter.org.

Sponsor

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation is an American non-profit foundation dedicated to fostering “informed and engaged communities” which the foundation believes are “essential for a healthy democracy.”