A new home for the IFCN Code of Principles

The International Fact Checking Network's code of principles has been redesigned in form and substance.

16 months after the implementation of this transparency certification created by and for fact-checking organizations, we thought it was necessary to improve the application experience and better communicate to the public what the code is for.

Today, the IFCN presents a new mini-site, video and application system. These explain more clearly the scope of IFCN verification, the requirements to obtain it and the commitments organizations abide by when they become signatories. We also share with the public all the information sent by the organizations at the time of their application and the assessment and recommendations made by the external assessor.

Some of the principles of the code and the requirements to fully comply with them have also changed.

Per the request of 42 IFCN verified signatories attending the Global Fact V summit held in Rome last June, the following criteria were modified to increase the transparency and neutrality required from aspiring signatories.

 

12

 

34

54ok

910

1112

1314

154b

1718

 

196a

216b

"The code of principles verification process was rigorous from day 1, but spread over a half a dozen of Google Docs that made it laborious for aspiring signatories and confusing for the public." said IFCN Director Alexios Mantzarlis. "The new site should bring about the same type of heightened transparency that we require of signatories to the process itself."

The next step will be translating several elements of the code of principles in multiple languages to recognize its global remit.

The new code of principles application process was developed by the Bosnian company Futurlink SEE and the Mexican design firm Mayor Que. Financial support for these expenses came from the Google News Initiative.

  • Profile picture for user Dulce Ramos

    Dulce Ramos

    Dulce Ramos is a Mexican journalist and Program Manager for the International Fact-Checking Network, for The Poynter Institute. In 2014, when she was the Executive Editor of news site Animal Politico, she led the efforts for the first fact-checking project in Mexico called The Bloodhound.

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